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Saturn's Children
     

Saturn's Children

3.6 41
by Charles Stross
 

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Freya Nakamichi-47 is a femmebot, one of the last of her kind still functioning. With no humans left to pay for the pleasures she provides, she agrees to transport a mysterious package from Mercury to Mars-only to become hunted by some very powerful humanoids who will stop at nothing to possess the contents of the package.

Overview

Freya Nakamichi-47 is a femmebot, one of the last of her kind still functioning. With no humans left to pay for the pleasures she provides, she agrees to transport a mysterious package from Mercury to Mars-only to become hunted by some very powerful humanoids who will stop at nothing to possess the contents of the package.

Editorial Reviews

New York Times
The act of creation seems to come easily to Charles Stross...He is peerless at dreaming up devices that could conceivably exist in 6, 60, or 600 years' time.
Gardner Dozois
Where Charles Stross goes today, the rest of science fiction will follow tomorrow. (Gardner Dozois, Editor, Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine)
Denver Post
Stross sizzles with ideas.
SF Revu
Charles Stross may be the science fiction field's most exciting writer.
Publishers Weekly

Sex oozes from every page of this erotic futuristic thriller. In a far-future class-driven android society, most of the populace are slave-chipped and owned by wealthy "aristos." When low-caste but unenslaved android Freya offends an aristo and needs to get off-world, she takes a courier position with the mysterious Jeeves Corporation, but the job turns out to have dangers of its own. Designed as a pleasure-module, Freya isn't quite as obsolete as she could be, as androids have sex with each other incessantly. Hugo-winner Stross (Halting State) has a deep message of how android slavery recapitulates humanity's past mistakes, but he struggles to make it heard over the moans and gunshots. Readers nostalgic for the SF of the '60s will find much that's familiar (including Freya's jumpsuit-clad form on the cover), but that doesn't quite compensate for the flaws. (July)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

After the extinction of the human race in the 23rd century, robots and androids continue to function, forming their own stratified society to carry out their creators' dreams of space colonization. Freya Nakamichi 47-a femmebot designed as a concubine for a race that no longer exists-occupies a place in society midway between the elite Aristos and the slave-chipped worker robots. Having to make her own way, she accepts a commission to deliver a small package from Mercury to Mars, unaware of the trouble that awaits her as humanoid factions vie for the contents of the package. The author of Singularity Sky and The Atrocity Archives always brings a fresh perspective to the genre, reinventing the future in bold new ways. Part space opera, part homage to late sf Grand Masters Robert Heinlein and Isaac Asimov, this tale of a very "human" android belongs in most sf collections.
—Jackie Cassada

From the Publisher
"Good fun... Heinlein himself would've liked this."
-SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE

"Sex oozes from every page of this erotic futuristic thriller."
-PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

"One of the most stylishly imaginative robot tales ever penned."
-BOOKLIST

"A smart and playful romp."
-TIMES (LONDON)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780441015948
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
07/01/2008
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.30(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"Good fun... Heinlein himself would've liked this."
-SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE

"Sex oozes from every page of this erotic futuristic thriller."
-PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

"One of the most stylishly imaginative robot tales ever penned."
-BOOKLIST

"A smart and playful romp."
-TIMES (LONDON)

Meet the Author

Charles Stross was born in Leeds, England in 1964. He holds degrees in pharmacy and computer science, and has worked in a variety of jobs including pharmacist, technical author, software engineer, and freelance journalist. He is now a full-time writer.

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Saturn's Children 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 41 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A smart, funny, and yes sometimes deep story with an entirely engaging main charachter. If Freya is an answer to Heinlein's Friday, all I have to say to Stross is 'Bravo, Sir!'. I'll save you the mini book report and just lest you know that the premise is a meaty one and handled very well by an accomplished writer with a firm grap of the Sci-Fi genre. Also a good interplanetary techno-thriller to boot. I'd not read this author before and sometimes felt that everthing good in Sci-Fi has already been written and that I had read it along with too much dreck. So pleased to have found a " new" author. Oh, yea. Freya Friday.... I get it now! Sometimes I can be so dense!
harstan More than 1 year ago
By the twenty-third century humanity was extinct leaving behind androids that were built to feel and think and even dream like mankind once did. The androids created a caste system. The Aristos are nobles who own slaves expected to obey them or else. There are also some free independent droids who are mostly impoverished manual laborers. --- Freya Nakamichi was made to be a sexbot, but thanks to her sibs is free. The mysterious Jeeves offers Freya a well paying job as a courier she accepts. Her first assignment is to go to Mercury to pick up a biological sample that she is to place in her uterus and bring it to a lab on Mars. The task seems simple and straightforward although she has no idea what the sample is and why suddenly people seem to be hunting her for her ¿package¿. She eludes killers, thieves and an assortment of other predators as she races to Mars. --- Imagine a world in which androids are the dominant species and act like humans in all respects except they cannot reproduce. Thus SATURN¿S CHILDREN is about a culture the androids have forged centered on a caste system although the slaves and the free strive for a better life. Freya is a bot Lara Craft, a strong willed skilled beauty who uses brain and some brawn to think her way out of danger. Charles Stross answers the Philip K. Dick philosophical question Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep? with this original look at a mirror humanoid culture. --- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good job
Marie Kolenski More than 1 year ago
It was a good book, but it would hav been better if she was human, or cared about real love. Other than that it was a bloody good read.
Traction_Bob More than 1 year ago
A beautiful world of interesting characters and science fiction in the old, hard-science manner. It hearkens back to Heinlein.
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