The Satyricon

The Satyricon

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by Petronius Arbiter
     
 

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"The Satyricon" is the most celebrated work of fiction to have survived from the ancient world. It can be described as the first realistic novel, the father of the picaresque genre. It recounts the sleazy progress of a pair of literate scholars as they wander through the cites of the southern Mediterranean, encountering en route type-figures whom the author wishes to…  See more details below

Overview

"The Satyricon" is the most celebrated work of fiction to have survived from the ancient world. It can be described as the first realistic novel, the father of the picaresque genre. It recounts the sleazy progress of a pair of literate scholars as they wander through the cites of the southern Mediterranean, encountering en route type-figures whom the author wishes to satirize—a teacher in higher education, a libidinous priest, a vulgar freedman turned millionaire, a manic poet, a superstitious sea-captain, a femme fatale. The novel has fascinated the literary world of Europe ever since, evoking praise for its elegant and hilarious description of the underside of Roman society, but also condemnation for some of its lubricous subjects; it also formed the subject of Fellini's controversial film. This new translation captures the gaiety of the original, whilst the introduction and detailed notes will provide serious students with a comprehensive and useful guide to the purposes of the novel.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A clever, yet scrupulous guide to the meaning of Petronius's Latin....When in paperback, an excellent teaching tool."—Religious Studies Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781458704030
Publisher:
ReadHowYouWant
Publication date:
02/24/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
465 KB

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Meet the Author

The manuscripts of the Satyricon ascribe the work to a "Petronius Arbiter", while a number of ancient authors (Macrobius, Sidonius Apollinaris, Marius Victorinus, Diomedes and Jerome) refer to the author as "Arbiter". Probably the name Arbiter is derived from Tacitus' reference to a courtier named Petronius as Nero's arbiter elegantiae or fashion adviser (Annals 16.18.2). That the author is the same as this courtier is disputed. Many modern scholars accept the identification, pointing to a perceived similarity of character between the two and to possible references in the Satyricon to affairs at the Neronian court. Others consider this conclusion "beyond conclusive proof"

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The Satyricon 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book crashed and they have not sent the new one.