Savage Cinema: Sam Peckinpah and the Rise of Ultraviolent Movies

Savage Cinema: Sam Peckinpah and the Rise of Ultraviolent Movies

by Stephen Prince
     
 

More than any other filmmaker, Sam Peckinpah opened the door for graphic violence in movies. In this book, Stephen Prince explains the rise of explicit violence in the American cinema, its social effects, and the relation of contemporary ultraviolence to the radical, humanistic filmmaking that Peckinpah practiced. Prince's account establishes, for the first time,… See more details below

Overview

More than any other filmmaker, Sam Peckinpah opened the door for graphic violence in movies. In this book, Stephen Prince explains the rise of explicit violence in the American cinema, its social effects, and the relation of contemporary ultraviolence to the radical, humanistic filmmaking that Peckinpah practiced. Prince's account establishes, for the first time, Peckinpah's place as a major filmmaker. This book is essential reading for those interested in Peckinpah, the problem of movie violence, and contemporary American cinema.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Prince (communications, Virginia Tech) looks at the theme of violence in Peckinpah's films and his influence on the ultraviolent filmmakers of today. Peckinpah made films in the 1960s, not coincidentally a time when the Vietnam War, urban riots, political assassinations, antiwar violence, and rising street crime were appearing on home television screens. In The Wild Bunch, Peckinpah thought extreme movie violence would have a cathartic effect, leaching away the audience's aggressive drives. But in most of Peckinpah's mature films, violence has negative consequences, and the pain of the survivors is obvious. This is completely different from today's ultraviolent movies, with their cartoonish depictions of death and mayhem. Much of the book discusses the cinematic techniques Peckinpah used to make the audience aware of the moral implications of the character's actions. Highly recommended for academic collections.--Marianne Cawley, Charleston Cty. P.L., SC
Robert Sklar
Prince's impressive study ...makes a convincing case for Peckinpah not as a wild man revelling in gore but as a serious film artist exploring screen violence as a way to assist spectators in gaining control over actual violence. In his conclusion, the author seeks to distance Peckinpah from what he considers the mindless and exploitative contemporary cycle of ultraviolent films.
—From The Times Literary Supplement.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780485300871
Publisher:
Continuum International Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/28/2000
Pages:
302
Product dimensions:
5.91(w) x 9.06(h) x (d)

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