Savannah Breeze

( 143 )

Overview

Southern belle BeBe Loudermilk has lost all her worldly possessions, thanks to a brief but disastrous relationship with the gorgeous Reddy, an "investment counselor" who turns out to be a con man. All that's left is a ramshackle 1950s motel on Tybee Island -- an eccentric beach town that calls itself a drinking village with a fishing problem.

Breeze Inn is a place where the very classy BeBe wouldn't normally be caught dead, but with no alternative, she moves into the manager's ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$12.40
BN.com price
(Save 17%)$14.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (141) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $8.07   
  • Used (136) from $0.00   
Savannah Breeze

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price

Overview

Southern belle BeBe Loudermilk has lost all her worldly possessions, thanks to a brief but disastrous relationship with the gorgeous Reddy, an "investment counselor" who turns out to be a con man. All that's left is a ramshackle 1950s motel on Tybee Island -- an eccentric beach town that calls itself a drinking village with a fishing problem.

Breeze Inn is a place where the very classy BeBe wouldn't normally be caught dead, but with no alternative, she moves into the manager's unit, vowing to make magic out of mud. The work is grueling, especially dealing with the bad-tempered caretaker, a fishing captain named Harry who's trying to earn enough dough to get his boat out of hock. With the help of Harry and her junking friend Weezie, BeBe soon has the motel spiffed up and attracting paying guests.

Then there's a sighting of Reddy in Fort Lauderdale, and BeBe decides to go after him. She puts together a posse, and with the irrepressible Granddaddy Loudermilk snoring in the backseat of the Buick, heads south. The plan is to carry out a sting that may be just a little bit outside the law but that, with any luck at all, will retrieve BeBe's fortune and put the dastardly Reddy in jail, where he belongs. And maybe Harry, who's looking more hunky every day, will finally get his boat back.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
In this sequel to Savannah Blues, BeBe Loudermilk has hit bottom. Cheated out of all her earthly possessions by a devilish hunk named Reddy, BeBe retreats to a rickety motor court patronized mainly, it seems, by alcoholics and giant mosquitoes. There the ever-feisty southern belle ekes out an existence in the midst of squalor, gradually reconstituting her life and improving the village. When somebody reports a chance sighting of Reddy in Fort Lauderdale, BeBe is ready to roll for total revenge. An engaging, entertaining read.
Publishers Weekly
Keating is simply delightful in the first-person role of BeBe Loudermilk, a thrice-divorced Southern belle and restaurant owner who falls for a gorgeous, smooth-talking con man who tricks her out of all her money and possessions. Putting on a lively Southern accent, Keating embodies BeBe perfectly, evoking her theatrical personality (wailing melodramatically over her loss), her self-deprecating humor and her never-give-up determination as she tries to pick up the pieces by getting a dilapidated motel up and running. Keating also creates distinct, believable voices for the other characters: a lazy drawl for BeBe's grandfather, whose absent-mindedness hides a shrewd mind; a gritty tone for Harry Sorrentino, the cantankerous hotel caretaker who alternately exasperates and attracts BeBe; and even voices of minor characters, including a Valley Girl-sounding young woman named Emma and a Spanish-accented bank teller. The audiobook is abridged, but you'd never know it: it flows seamlessly. It's a rollicking, entertaining story from beginning to end. This audiobook production makes an already enjoyable book even more fun, perfect for beach listening. Simultaneous release with the HarperCollins hardcover (Reviews, Jan. 30). (Apr.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
A great businesswoman but a ditz in the romance department, BeBe Loudermilk, whom we met in Andrews's Savannah Blues, returns having just signed over her real estate holdings, home, and successful restaurant to a con man who sweeps her off her feet. Poor BeBe is nearly broke and completely humiliated; she does have a wreck of a 1950s motel down by the beach though, inhabited by a wreck of a caretaker trying to get his fishing boat out of hock. BeBe and her friend Weezie, helped out by Harry the caretaker (who turns out to be a lot more appealing that BeBe first thought), get the motel back in shape for guests, and BeBe is starting to make money again when she hears that the con man has been sighted in Florida. The weasel doesn't stand a chance! Reader Isabel Keating does a great job with all the voices and accents, bringing the characters alive. Her pacing keeps the story moving right along. Recommended for public libraries where light summer fiction is popular. Barbara Valle, El Paso P.L., TX Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Andrews brings back characters from Savannah Blues (2002) for a new set of misadventures. BeBe Loudermilk is a member of Savannah's glitterati, a successful restaurateur and, thanks to some real-estate serendipity, a budding Donald Trump. While BeBe is a whiz at spotting a business opportunity, she is a washout when it comes to picking men. At 35, she has three divorces under her belt. Yet BeBe can't seem to help herself when a gorgeous man, Reddy Millbanks III, pours on the charm. Blinded by his physical prowess and distracted by other developments in her disorganized personal life, BeBe fails to catch wind of his schemes. She wakes up one morning to find that Reddy has stolen her small fortune; virtually penniless, BeBe learns the only thing left in her portfolio is a beat-up beach motel on Tybee Island. It's a painful fall from her lofty society-girl perch. BeBe is forced to scrub toilets and sweep floors in order to salvage her finances-if she can quickly rehab this property and turn it over for a profit, she might be back in business. While making cheap improvements at the motel, BeBe butts heads with taciturn manager Harry. Though Harry bristles at BeBe's bossiness and acquisitiveness, the two find common ground as they commiserate about the cards they've been dealt. Predictably, sparks fly when the uptown girl and salty dog get together. Meanwhile, BeBe and her best pal, Weezie, drum up a kooky scheme worthy of Lucy and Ethel to hunt down Reddy and out-swindle him-zany costumes and numerous cocktails are involved. A successful combination of romance and action make this sunny novel a beach-ready treat.
Rocky Mountain News
“Fun and fast-paced, yet emotional and warm.”
Boston Globe
“Lively...Andrews lays on lots of Savannah atmosphere and Southern charm.”
Star News (Wilmington)
"Andrews is a practiced comic who detonates a laugh on nearly every page. She has great fun affectionately sticking the skewers through a certain type of Southern lady, bless her heart, for whom the phrase ‘What would Momma say?’ carries even more weight than ‘What would Jesus do?’"
Star News (Wilmington
“Andrews is a practiced comic who detonates a laugh on nearly every page. She has great fun affectionately sticking the skewers through a certain type of Southern lady, bless her heart, for whom the phrase ‘What would Momma say?’ carries even more weight than ‘What would Jesus do?’”
Star News (Wilmington))
"Andrews is a practiced comic who detonates a laugh on nearly every page. She has great fun affectionately sticking the skewers through a certain type of Southern lady, bless her heart, for whom the phrase ‘What would Momma say?’ carries even more weight than ‘What would Jesus do?’"
Booklist
“Truly enjoyable . . . packed with Andrews’ trademark wit and humor.”
Romantic Times BOOKclub
“A fun book! The characters come alive and jump off the page.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060564674
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/30/2007
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 120,604
  • Product dimensions: 5.31 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 1.04 (d)

Meet the Author

Mary Kay Andrews

Mary Kay Andrews is the author of eleven bestselling novels and ten critically acclaimed mysteries. A former reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, she lives in Atlanta, Georgia.

Biography

In In 2003, a writer named Mary Kay Andrews burst on the book scene with an entertaining, lighthearted confection entitled Savannah Blues. Hailed as a promising debut, the book received positive reviews; but not everyone realized it was actually the work of journalist-turned-novelist Kathy Hogan Trocheck, author of a bestselling mystery series begun in 1990 and featuring ex-cop-turned P.I. Callahan Garrity.

Trocheck explained in an interview with Reading Group Guides.com the reason for adopting a pseudonym (derived, by the way, from combining the names of her two children): "Because Blues is so different from my Callahan books, I wanted a chance to try for a whole new group of readers, people who like women's fiction, Southern fiction, and still, mysteries. That Mary Kay is a pseudonym for Kathy Hogan Trocheck is not a secret from my fans."

Savannah Blues introduced readers to Eloise "Weezie" Foley, whose marriage to the wealthy Talmadge Evans III suffers a fatal blow when he announces he is in love with someone else. When Talmadge's mistress moves into his Savannah mansion, it's the backyard carriage house for Weezie, who soon begins to devise a plan to get revenge on her cheating hubby. Blues may have been a marked departure from Trocheck's grittier early work, but it was a rousing success on all fronts. Publishers Weekly hailed it as "delightfully breezy, richly atmospheric" and Kirkus reviews called it "pure fun."

Soon, Mary Kay Andrews had assumed a life of her own. A year later, she published Little Bitty Lies, followed in 2005 by the joyfully wacky New York Times bestseller Hissy Fit. Having revisited the world of her irresistible protagonist Weezie Foley twice more in Savannah Breeze and Blue Christmas, Andrews continues to craft her winning brand of witty, Southern-fried fiction -- much to the delight of her many fans.

Good To Know

When Andrews was a journalist at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, she covered the famous "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil" murder case.

As Kathy Hogan Trocheck, Andrews's mysteries have been nominated for the Edgar, Anthony, Agatha, and Macavity Awards.

When she isn't writing, Mary Kay Andrews lectures and teaches at writing workshops.

A few fun outtakes from our interview with Andrews:

"When I finish writing a book, I always celebrate with my favorite junk foods: Reese's Peanut Butter Cups and Wink grapefruit soda."

"I have no sense of direction and am incapable of reading a map."

"I'm a charter member of the Salty Dog chapter of the Andy Griffith Show Re-run Watchers club."

"I love afternoon naps, junking, reading, cooking with my husband, anything with avocados, English Setters, old movies, anything blue and white. I hate shopping for clothes, cigarette smoke, math, magic, mimes, scary movies, and Star Trek re-runs."

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Kathy Hogan Trocheck (real name)
    2. Hometown:
      Atlanta, Georgia
    1. Date of Birth:
      July 27, 1954
    2. Place of Birth:
      Tampa, Florida
    1. Education:
      B.A. in newspaper journalism, University of Georgia, 1976
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Savannah Breeze LP


By Mary Kay Andrews

HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright ©2006 Mary Kay Andrews
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0060853468

Chapter One

He was introduced to me as "Reddy" -- short for Ryan Edward Millbanks III. And I should have known better. He was younger. Too young. Sexy. Too sexy. Dead sexy. Exquisite manners. And as he leaned in, kissing me lightly on the cheek, I nearly fainted from the pheromones the man emitted. "I've heard so much about you from your ex-husband," he whispered, his mustache tickling my ear.

Alarms should have gone off. Sirens, blinking lights. Robotic voices should have warned me away. But the band was playing something Gershwinish, and I wouldn't have listened anyway. I only heard what I wanted to hear.

At the mention of my ex, I looked around the tightly packed ballroom with alarm. "Richard? What's Richard doing here? They were supposed to notify me when he was released."

Reddy looked confused and laughed to cover up his embarrassment. "Richard? But . . . Sandy Thayer told me, I mean, well, Sandy said you were his ex-wife. That is, he pointed in this direction and suggested I come talk to you. In fact, he suggested you might need rescuing from your date. You are BeBe Loudermilk, have I got that right?"

Now it was my turn to laugh. "Oh, Sandy. Yes, you've got that right. Sandy is my ex. Or I'm his. Twice, in fact. Sorry, I've been drinkingwine all night. As for my date, I'm not sure he remembers he brought me." I grimaced in the direction of Tater Love, my so-called date, who'd spent most of the evening drooling down the front of my ball gown, and who was now draped over the bar, consuming one beer after another.

Tater was a last-minute fix-up, and I should have known better, but it was the Telfair Ball, which was the social event of the year in Savannah, and I'd already paid for the tickets, and it wasn't as though my former fiancé, Emery Cooper, would be joining me.

Emery, one of the Cooper-Hale Mortuary Coopers, had called long distance, the previous week, to let me know that he and his ex-wife were on their way to Jamaica, to be remarried on the beach, which was the site of their first wedding. And their second honeymoon.

I thought I handled the news rather well. I took the salmon steaks I'd bought for our dinner that evening, drove over to his town house on Lafayette Square, and slid them through the mail slot in the door. That way, when Emery and his new bride returned home in a week, they'd have something to remember me by.

There was no way I was going to skip the Telfair Ball. For one thing, I was on the host committee. For another, by now, everybody in town knew that Emery had thrown me over for Cissy Drobish, the bucktoothed millionairess mother of his three children. It wouldn't do to have people talking about me behind my back. If they were going to talk, by God, they could just do it to my face.

"Hold your head up high, girl," I could hear my late father saying to me, nudging me as I slumped down in the pew in church. So I did as I was taught. I'd spent the whole day of the ball getting ready for battle: manicure, pedicure, facial, herbal massage, and new honey-blond highlights in my hair. I'd gotten all my big-girl jewelry out of the safe-deposit box, and had Roi, my hairdresser, pile my hair on top of my head so everybody could see that I hadn't returned Emery's diamond earrings.

However fabulous I looked, however, did not change the fact that I was stuck for the evening with Tater Love, friend of a friend of a friend, confirmed bachelor, who'd been too cheap to rent the evening shoes to go with his tux. Scuffed-black-loafer Tater Love. Cocktail-sauce-on-his-shirtfront Tater Love. It was going to be a very long evening. Which was why I'd decided to anesthetize myself with chardonnay as soon as we arrived at the dance.

Reddy took my elbow and guided me firmly from the dance floor to a remote corner of the ballroom occupied only by a grotesque marble statue of an unidentified Greek goddess and a large potted palm.

"About my exes -- " I started to explain.

"Shhh," Reddy said, putting a finger to my lips. "Be right back," he promised. And when he reappeared, he had a plate of lobster in one hand and a pair of crystal flutes in the other. He lifted the front of his dinner jacket -- it looked Armani, but I couldn't be sure -- and extracted an unopened bottle of Moët & Chandon from the waistband of his trousers.

Which should have signaled another set of alarms -- beware of men bearing gifts in their pants.

He popped the champagne cork with one smooth, expert motion -- I was soon to learn that he was an expert on many, many things -- and poured a glass for each of us. Reddy clinked his flute lightly against mine. "To new beginnings," he said, and he smiled that rogue smile.

And that was the end of all my good intentions.

Continues...


Excerpted from Savannah Breeze LP by Mary Kay Andrews Copyright ©2006 by Mary Kay Andrews. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

Introduction

Mary Kay Andrews's latest novel has everything: love, a little revenge, and even two great recipes. Her lively main character, BeBe Loudermilk, has great energy and drive, but even the resourceful BeBe takes a hit when a gorgeous con man seduces her and walks away with everything she owns. Well, almost everything. All that's left is a dilapidated 1950s motel on Tybee Island. The Breeze Inn is not this former Savannah deb's kind of haunt, to put it mildly. Soon, though, with her spirit of can-do and the help of a few good friends, BeBe picks herself up and pitches in. What happens along the way, including an attraction to the also dilapidated but fast-improving manager of the Breeze Inn and some innovative decorating ideas, will keep readers staying up late. This is a delectable romp, masterfully written, and it hits all the right notes: serious, fun, and truehearted.

Questions for Discussion

Question:Question: 1. Were you fooled by Reddy? Were there any clues that he was trouble?

Question: 2. Can you imagine losing everything you own in the world, even your clothes? What do you think that you would do?

Question: 3. Is this a particularly Southern novel? If so, what are the elements that make it that way?

Question: 4. BeBe is a woman who thinks she knows what she wants in life. How does this stand in her way?

Question: 5. What does Andrews's portrayal of BeBe's grandparents have to say about aging? Did you find these characters frustrating, charming, or both?

Question: 6. Do you believe that people can really change? How do BeBe and Harry change each other? Is this change believable?

Question: 7. On page 162 Bebe says, "Up until the day I realized that my second husband, Richard, had that unfortunate penchant for computer porn, I'd always thought of myself as somebody who was naturally lucky." Do you think there is such a thing as "natural luck"?

Question: 8. Each of the characters in this story has pride, and shows it in different ways. How do we see this, and what part does pride play in what happens?

Question: 9. Would you say that this is a feminist novel? Why or why not?

Question: 10. Savannah Breeze definitely has a happy ending. What is it about happy endings in general that has such a powerful effect on readers? Are there happy endings in real life?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 143 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(69)

4 Star

(56)

3 Star

(11)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 144 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Savannah Breeze

    Mary Kay Andrews is one of my favorite authors. I have not read anything I didn't like from her. Once again in this book, she captures just the right amount of everything to make this book one to leave you feeling good. Her books are funny, have a few twists, but end on a happy note. Nice easy read.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 29, 2012

    I didn't think this book would be entertaining and it proved me

    I didn't think this book would be entertaining and it proved me wrong. Another great by Andrews!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 22, 2012

    A must read if you have ever been or want to visit savannah

    Growing up in and around savannah, I knew these women. I knew all the little quirks that make us ( savannahians!) every bit as interesting as this story details. Visit my city, if not read this book and any others that ms. Andrews may pen. She nailed us down without putting us down.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2009

    A quickie for a sunny afternoon

    A fun book to read on a warm sunny day out on the beach... it is a quick read as well...

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Didn't want it to end!

    This book is so charming! I couldn't put it down. The characters are so lovable and personable; I wish there were of more of these with the same ensemble. I didn't want it to end.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2006

    A little disappointing

    Because I have absolutely loved all of Mary Kay Andrews' books, I waited with great anticipation for this one. The plot is a little outlandish and I couldn't identify with her main character's plight. Please read Andrews' other books before you read this one.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2006

    need more stars

    This book was hilarious. I just had surgery and I really need my sleep but I just could not put this book down. I had to stay up and finish it. Loved the characters....hope she writes more like this...or even more with these characters.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2013

    Love Mary Kay Andrews

    Have bought and read all ofnher books and have not been disappointed!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 13, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I was pleasantly surprised to find out this is the sequel to 'Sa

    I was pleasantly surprised to find out this is the sequel to 'Savannah Blues', I'm glad I read them in the order I did. This one is mostly from the point-of-view of BeBe, Weezie's best friend. Cute story, fun read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 29, 2011

    Dont waste your time...

    Story was dull and predictable. If i didnt know better i would have thought a child wrote it. I was very disappointed and it was painful to read such childish nonsense.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2009

    A great summer read on a rainy day.

    This book was a fast read as it provided a humors look at a stressful situation.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Funny and Exciting!

    Mary Andrews is a very talented author, bringing to life the story, the location, the characters AND the readers of her books!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2014

    Lion with feirce roar

    Pads in

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2014

    Great Quick Read

    Excellent beach read! It's a page turner!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2014

    Great read

    I loved this book. I had no idea when I started reading it, it would be so funny. I couldn't put it down.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 8, 2014

    A Great Summer Read!

    Mary Kay has done it again! Her stories are lighthearted, make me chuckle out loud and cheer me up. I'm a Georgia girl, and always enjoy reading southern authors.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    SUMMER FUN

    Thoroughly enjoyed this "summer read". Would recommend it (in fact, I have!).

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2014

    Loved it!

    I love everything by this author.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 1, 2014

    good book

    would reccomend this book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 1, 2014

    Great read!

    I enjoyed this book. Great story!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 144 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)