The Savannah Cookbook
  • The Savannah Cookbook
  • The Savannah Cookbook

The Savannah Cookbook

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by Damon Lee Fowler
     
 

For hundreds of years, Savannah has charmed residents and visitors alike with its fine old architecture, wide, cobbled streets and romantic moss-draped trees. Though less widely known than its haunting beauty and fabled eccentricities, part of the enchantment of Savannah is its cuisine. Blending European, Asian, and West African customs Damon Lee Fowler introduces

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Overview

For hundreds of years, Savannah has charmed residents and visitors alike with its fine old architecture, wide, cobbled streets and romantic moss-draped trees. Though less widely known than its haunting beauty and fabled eccentricities, part of the enchantment of Savannah is its cuisine. Blending European, Asian, and West African customs Damon Lee Fowler introduces The Savannah Cookbook, offering recipes for Southern classics such as rice and grits, soups and stews, poultry, fish and meat dishes, as well as a helpful chapter on pantry basics.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

Fowler, a food writer, cookbook author (New Southern Kitchen and others), and culinary historian, fell in love with Savannah the first time he visited it nearly three decades ago, and he has lived there ever since. His new book is a celebration of the city's cuisine, and the recipes include both traditional Savannah favorites, such as Crab and Tomato Soup, and dishes that reflect the waves of later immigrants, such as Greek Roast Lamb with Lemon and Potatoes. Many of them are updated versions of recipes from old cookbooks, and Fowler includes the history and provenance of each dish. Savannah hosts are legendary for their hospitality, and Fowler includes a separate chapter on "Parties & Receptions." Numerous color photographs show off both the recipes and the city's charm. For most collections.


—Judith Sutton

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423602248
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
05/10/2008
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
8.78(w) x 10.10(h) x 1.18(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

About the Recipes

Savannah remains, at heart, a Southern city, and its cuisine sharesmuch with the rest of the South. Much of it differs from that of nearby Charleston, or of far away Houston, Texas, or Charlottesville, Virginia, only in detail. Recipes for buttermilk biscuits, cornbread, boiled peanuts, deviled eggs, fried chicken,macaroni pie, barbecue, pecan pie, and peach cobbler are common in other Southern cookbooks; unless the details of Savannah’s version varied in a significant way, or the dish had a deep association with our city, I did not include it here, since those things can easily be found elsewhere.

Despite what you may have heard about “The Sovereign Free–State of Chatham” (a nickname not always meant as a compliment), Savannah is not a separate country, existing in a vacuum cut off from the world. As we’ve already seen, its population is far fromhomogenous.Moreover, Savannahians of all walks and ethnic backgrounds subscribe to national and international foodmagazines and watched the Food Network long before our favorite adopted daughter was its star. Savannahians have always loved to travel and bring home culinary ideas fromdistant lands.When America discovered pesto, basil appeared in our courtyards; when Southwestern cooking took the country, we bought chipotle chili peppers and added cumin to our black bean soup; when Thai cooking took center stage, fermented fish sauce appeared (or, more accurately, reappeared) in our pantries. In this respect, this city is no different from any other. Needless to say, a recital of recipes from such sources would be superfluous.

Meet the Author

Damon Lee Fowler is a nationally respected authority on the history of Southern foodways. He has authored six critically acclaimed cookbooks including The Savannah Cookbook and New Southern Baking, has edited and annotated three facsimile reprints of important American cookbooks, and was editor and recipe developer for the Jefferson Foundation's first Monticello Cookbook, Dining at Monticello. His work has appeared in Food & Wine, Relish, and Charleston Magazine. He lives in Savannah, Georgia, where he teaches cooking and is the feature food writer for the Savannah Morning News.

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The Savannah Cookbook 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago