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Save as Draft [NOOK Book]

Overview

SAVE AS DRAFT @Readers A love triangle evolving over e-mails, ...
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Save as Draft

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Overview

SAVE AS DRAFT @Readers A love triangle evolving over e-mails, texts, and Facebook messages that makes you wonder if the things we leave unsaid—or rather unsent—could change the story of our lives.
6:59 PM Feb. 14th via twitterfeed

Sent: Monday, February 14, 2011

From: Izabell

To: Reader

Subject: Save as Draft

Are we Facebook friends yet? I’m the wactress (waitress/actress) turned lawyer who lives her life online. (Don’t we all these days?)

Anyway, I’ve got this problem. . . . There’s this guy. His name’s Peter. He’s my best friend and co-worker, and we just started dating, which is potentially a huge mistake. But, that’s not all. There’s this other guy, Marty. I met him on eHarm, and he ran with the bulls in Spain. I can’t get him off my mind. What a mess. I’d love your advice if you can take a second out of your crazy, high-tech life. Shoot me an e-mail. Or text me. Or BB messenger me.

And friend me if you haven’t already! You can find me on Facebook under Save as Draft.

Izabell
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Lee, a federal prosecutor by day, makes a foray into chick lit with this autobiographical novel told entirely through e-mail, text, and Web exchanges. Tedious early chapters, during which bubbly protagonist Izabell "Izzy" Chin connects with an eHarmony hopeful named Martin, give way to a winning mix of humor and pathos. After a successful first date, Izzy dumps Martin for her best friend Peter; the two fall hard and get engaged, but the whirlwind coincides with Peter getting a demanding new job. E-mail, Facebook, or text missives show the spark fading as Peter gives in to his workaholic boss's demands and Izzy drifts back to Martin. Lee's inherently intimate format succeeds most when a character's thoughts are revealed in unsent e-mails ("save as Draft"), revealing the outcomes that could have been had more fearless actions been taken and how matters are misinterpreted and misunderstood. Lee further complicates her formal stew with comic exchanges between friends addressing online dating and the true nature of marriage with decidedly mixed results. This is an honest and oddly relatable novel that unfolds in a sometimes clunky format. (Feb.)
From the Publisher
Save as Draft is a witty and page-turning look at dating mores in the internet age. It’s also filled with heart. After a bad e-harmony date, don’t despair! Come home, curl up with a glass of Cabernet, and read this book by Cavanaugh Lee. She’s great company and she’ll never de-friend you.”
—Amy Sohn, author of Prospect Park West

“Reading Save as Draft gives the vicarious thrill of peeking where one shouldn’t only to get drawn in by the warm and funny heartbeat with which Cavanaugh Lee has infused this up-to-the-second modern romance. I haven't wanted a guy to hit ‘send’ this badly since college—a truly good time!”
—Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus, authors of the New York Times bestselling The Nanny Diaries

"A quick, fun debut novel involving commitment avoidance, meet-cutes and falling in love in the electronic age."
Kirkus Reviews

Library Journal
Izabell Chin is a former struggling actress and newly minted lawyer just hired at a large Atlanta firm. As she begins life in her new city, she also makes her foray into online dating. Seemingly well matched with Marty, Izabell realizes she is interested romantically in her best friend and fellow lawyer, Peter. Presented entirely in emails, text messages, and tweets, this first novel shows the romantic dialog among Izabell, Marty, and Peter, both in what is written and sent and what is held back. Lee, also a former struggling actress-turned-lawyer, has penned a semiautobiographical novel that suffers from its very format—it feels like a gimmick that renders the story abrupt, intense, and shallow. Those who have ever viewed their own full inbox as a harrowing prospect will understand why the voyeuristic thrill wears off quickly here. VERDICT While the idea that the words we don't say—those we save to our draft folder—are the more important ones is interesting and sometimes heartbreaking, this remains a marginal story of a confused woman trying to figure out what she wants out of love.—Jennifer Beach, Rice, VA
Kirkus Reviews

Lee, a former actress turned lawyer who in real life found love in a Southern city, patternsher central character, Izabell Chin, and the story line on her own experiences.

This tale of Izabell's love life is chronicled through a series of e-mails and text messages, mostly exchanged between Izabell, Peter and her inner circle of friends, Elizabeth, Annette and Brooke. Izabell's story commences when she enrolls in a popular online-dating site and finds Martin, with whom she shares a love of movies and other mutual likes. But when Peter, her best friend from when they interned together at an Atlanta law firm, reappears, Izzy decides to take a chance and see if friendship and her attraction to Peter can lead to something deeper. They soon connect as Izzy hoped, but life and their relationship become complicated as her friends deal with their own divorces, marriages and, in buddy Annette's case, a slew of entirely inappropriate would-be suitors piling up from her personal foray into online dating. Also in the picture: Izzy's and Peter's parents, a demanding, hateful and downright unsympathetic slave driver of a boss, Rose, the ever-hopeful wannabe suitor, Marty, and one of Peter's old girlfriends. The heart of the story centers not on the e-mails sent, but those not sent. Those e-mails were written and then saved as drafts (hence the title), and that's where the characters reveal their true feelings. Lee has a genuine knack for crafting light fiction and the book is an ideal carry-along on any e-mail addict's plane ride. But for those not enamored of electronic communication, the e-mail and text approach may prove more annoying than riveting.

A quick, fun debut novel involving commitment avoidance, meet-cutes and falling in love in the electronic age.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439190722
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 1,107,908
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Cavanaugh Lee was raised in San Francisco, and received her undergraduate degree from UCLA’s School of Theatre.  After graduation, she worked steadily as a “wactress” for four years.  True love (or so she thought) led her to the deep south of Mississippi, and when the relationship imploded she stuck around south and received her law degree from UNC.  By day, she is a prosecutor in Savannah, Georgia and by night she is searching for true love and working on the sequel to SAVE AS DRAFT.
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Read an Excerpt


JANUARY 2008: DATELESS … BUT NOT DESPERATE

Sent:
Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 7:31 PM

From:
Izabell

To:
Elizabeth

Subject:
Tough Times All Around

E—

Did you know that the single guy to single girl ratio in this city is 1 to 8???!!!! Is this really true? This can’t be true. Ugh, maybe that explains my fourth consecutive month of NOT dating here in the ATL, or pseudo-dating (translation: hanging out with best guy friend who has no interest in me sexually or otherwise).

I tell ya, it’s tough times all around …

—Izzy


Sent:
Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 7:35 PM

From:
Elizabeth

To:
Izabell

Subject:
Re: Tough Times All Around

Online dating. Try it.

And, FYI: your “best guy friend” has been hot for your bod for two years now—don’t fish for compliments.


Sent:
Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 7:38 PM

From:
Izabell

To:
Elizabeth

Subject:
Re: Tough Times All Around

Online dating will NOT be happening. So unromantic. Not my style. And, no, on the contrary, my “best guy friend” really is just that—my “best guy friend.”

—“Idealistically Opposed to Online Dating Izzy”


Sent:
Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 8:05 PM

From:
Elizabeth

To:
Izabell

Subject:
Re: Tough Times All Around

Suit yourself. My friend, Jen, met a guy on eHarmony or Match or whatever the hell and now they’re getting married this summer.


Sent:
Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 8:10 PM

From:
Izabell

To:
Elizabeth

Subject:
Re: Tough Times All Around

Yeah, right, my luck, it’ll be e(DIS)Harmony or NON-Match. I would never, ever subject myself to being rejected ON-line. It’s bad enough being rejected IN-person. My computer is the only safe haven I have left.


Sent:
Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 8:12 PM

From:
Elizabeth

To:
Izabell

Subject:
Re: Tough Times All Around

Methinks the lady doth protest too much …


Draft:
Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 8:13 PM

From:
Izabell

To:
Elizabeth

Subject:
Re: Tough Times All Around

This e-mail was written but not sent and will save as Draft until further action.

Fine. I’ll consider it. But only to prove you wrong!


Sent:
Tuesday, January 1, 2008 at 11:38 PM

From:
Izabell

To:
Elizabeth

Subject:
Re: Tough Times All Around

Sorry, not gonna happen. I may be dateless, but NOT desperate.


Sent:
Wednesday, January 2, 2008 at 9:09 AM

From:
eHarmony

To:
Izabell

Subject:
eHarmony: ? At a Discount–Get 2 Months FREE!

Get a 3-month subscription for the price of 1! Yes, that means “3 for 1”! Let us make it easier for you to find ? by giving you an extra TWO MONTHS FREE.

Subscribe now to find ? ? ?!

(Because you asked to be notified of eHarmony Special Offers, we will send you e-mails such as this one on a periodic basis.)

(To unsubscribe from this type of e-mail, please click here within 15 days of receipt, or contact customer service.)

(Please note this offer expires at the end of the month.)

© 2011 Cavanaugh Lee

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 14 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Heartbreaking and realistic novel.

    Review by Stephanie: s a charming novel that's bound to leave you hanging and frustrated at end, the very first epistolary fiction piece I've read since Paula Danziger's Snail Mail, No More. Written entirely in emails, text messages, and Twitter updates, this book is sweepingly honest, as well as full of emotion. There lies a secret thrill in being able to peek inside someone's private life, especially in an era that is so dependent on internet communication.

    Cavanaugh Lee does not stop there. The essence of Save as Draft delves even deeper than the privacy of a password-protected email account, because the reader gets the inside scoop on what the characters don't. Emails that have been "saved as draft" or in less-techy terms, written but unsent, are revealed, opening up a whole nother road in knowing what the characters are actually thinking.

    Izzy and Peter, the engaged couple, seemingly have everything paved out ahead of them. But miscommunication and too many saved drafts take a toll on the passionate relationship. You'll love reading how their relationship builds, climaxes, and abruptly falls, making you both cringe(because of how closely this hits to home -- this might as well be YOUR love life in YOUR email account) and smile (from the wit and the glad-it-wasn't-me! incidents) all within the same page.
    I love how the plot is conveyed through Facebook notifications (Izabell Chin has added you as a friend on Facebook) and eHarmony profiles to develop characters. It's a fun, flirty way to get to know the protagonists and the main conflicts.

    The ending made me so mad, but I couldn't have made it any more perfect. I won't give any spoilers, but I will say that it was sort of a tragic ending. Meaning, things do not end happily-ever-after as predicted. The ending is happy yes, just not the way I had thought it would be. Save as Draft is a heartbreakingly realistic novel that demonstrates human error in the ways we never speak what we think...and never think what we say speak either.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2011

    Interesting

    This is a book written in forms of texts, twitter updates and (mainly) emails. "Save as Draftz" is s realistic and clever romance novel that I, personally stayed up all night to read. Unconventional at best, but worth reading, nonetheless. Spoiler: may not be the best book for you if you need spelled out endings. Otherwise, highly reccomended, enjoy!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 10, 2011

    LOVED IT!

    I read the book in 2 days and couldn't put it down. I can't wait for another book to come out by Lee.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2011

    Close to home for most

    This book hits very close to home for most people in our generation. Though I flew through the book, the ending leftbme unsatisfied. But I suppose that's real life for you? I was rooting for the eharm guy the whole time, so his sudden change in demenor upset me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 4, 2011

    Hard to put down, but wish I had!

    Save As Draft caught my attention because it's how we communicate today, so why not pick a book that half the world can relate too? I couldn't put the book down, I read it in a few hours. After I read it I was extremely dissapointed, I wanted more! I could not believe I wasted my money on this book! Maybe a sequel could change that, life after the storm....

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 25, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    8 out of 10 stars

    Save as Draft is a charming novel that's bound to leave you hanging and frustrated at end, the very first epistolary fiction piece I've read since Paula Danziger's Snail Mail No More.
    Written entirely in emails, text messages, and Twitter updates, this book is sweepingly honest, as well as full of emotion. There lies a secret thrill in being able to peek inside someone's private life, especially in an era that is so dependent on internet communication.
    Cavanaugh Lee does not stop there. The essence of Save as Draft delves even deeper than the privacy of a password-protected email account, because the reader gets the inside scoop on what the characters don't. Emails that have been "saved as draft" or in less-techy terms, written but unsent, are revealed, opening up a whole nother road in knowing what the characters are actually thinking.
    Izzy and Peter, the engaged couple seemingly have everything paved out ahead of them. But miscommunication and too many saved drafts take a toll on the passionate relationship. You'll love reading how their relationship builds, climaxes, and abruptly falls, making you both cringe (because of how closely this hits to home -- this might as well be YOUR love life in YOUR email account) and smile (from the wit and the glad-it-wasn't-me! incidents) all within the same page.
    I love how the plot is conveyed through Facebook notifications (Izabell Chin has added you as a friend on Facebook) and eHarmony profiles to develop characters. It's a fun, flirty way to get to know the protagonists and the main conflicts.
    The ending made me so mad, but I couldn't have made it any more perfect. I won't give any spoilers, but I will say that it was sort of a tragic ending. Meaning, things do not end happily-ever-after as predicted. The ending is happy yes, just not the way I had thought it would be. Save as Draft is a heartbreakingly realistic novel that demonstrates human error in the ways we never speak what we think...and never think what we say speak either.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 3, 2011

    A Modern Day "You've Got Mail"

    Save as Draft is an updated version of You've Got Mail with a healthy dose of humor and, so far, one of the best things I've read this year. First time author Cavanaugh Lee takes readers along on the adventures of the sparkling Izabell (Izzy) Chin as she balances her romantic and familial relationships, along with friendships.

    Told through a series of e-mails, FaceBook postings and tweets, Save as Draft is a "girl meets boy, girl dates other boys, girl dates original boy, boy loses girl, another boy finds girl, boy wants girl back" story. Confused? Well sure, it takes a minute to get everyone straight, but you'll have absolutely no trouble understanding what's going on.

    Mixed in with Izzy's tweets, postings and e-mails with various characters are the draft versions of emails. These are the most honest of everything the characters say because they portray their true feelings. We've all had moments when we typed an e-mail that really expressed how we felt, but hit "save as draft" instead of send. As a reader, I found myself wishing the characters had the nerve to hit send. In some instances they finally did, but in others true feelings were never expressed, which made me wonder if things would have turned out differently had those feelings been made known. Ms. Lee is at work on a sequel, so I guess we'll have to wait to find out.

    What did you like about this book?
    It's gives a very accurate portrayal of how people interact today. With texting, tweeting, Facebooking and e-mail, it really is possible to conduct a relationship and go for extended periods of time without talking to someone by phone. Is that a good or a bad thing? Unless you truly know someone, and sometimes even if you do, it can be difficult to read their tone through electronic communication.

    Another thing communicating electronically does it take away face to face time. Since the characters already know each other, for the most part, it's not until maybe midway through the book that the reader learns Izzy is Asian-American. And that only comes out as a result of a conversation that she has with someone she's met through an online service. Up until that point, I don't know that I had an image of her in my head. Not knowing what she looked like didn't take away from the story. And when I realized that she wasn't the typical "white chick" of chick lit, I gladly added her to my Colorful Chick Lit list.

    What didn't you like about the book?
    I don't like not knowing what's going to happen next. I was so sure that Izzy and another character would re-connect, but that didn't happen. It's almost like feeling happy for your friend when she gets what she wants, but, as a friend, you think you know what's better for her. So while I'm happy that she's happy, I'd really like her to see with the guy I think she should be with. Does that make sense?

    What could the author do to improve this book?
    Finish writing the sequel, because I'm dying to see what happens next!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 29, 2011

    Chick Lit for the Internet Generation

    I'm a huge Chick Lit reader and was lucky enough to read an advance copy of "Save as Draft." What a fun read! The book is totally written in the media we all use on a daily basis to tell our own stories: texts, emails, facebook status updates, tweets and internet dating profiles. As you read, it's almost as if you are one of Izzy's friends, following her travails by email and text as she juggles two love interests with a demanding job as an attorney. The reader can totally identify with her kooky group of friends as they chime in with their individual opinions regarding work, love and life.

    Each chapter ends with a teaser that forces you to keep reading, until you find yourself giggling your way to the end of the book. I highly recommend.

    Oh, and the cover is way cool!

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