Save the Cat!: The Last Book on Screenwriting You'll Ever Need

Save the Cat!: The Last Book on Screenwriting You'll Ever Need

4.6 31
by Blake Snyder
     
 

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This ultimate insider's guide reveals the secrets that none dare admit, told by a show biz veteran who's proven that you can sell your script if you can save the cat!

Overview

This ultimate insider's guide reveals the secrets that none dare admit, told by a show biz veteran who's proven that you can sell your script if you can save the cat!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781615930005
Publisher:
Wiese, Michael Productions
Publication date:
05/25/2005
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
195
Sales rank:
70,854
File size:
3 MB

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Save the Cat! 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
lonelyryu More than 1 year ago
First of all, I must say that if you're a critic that knows everything, then don't buy this book. But if you're open minded to a new method and an easier way to break down a script, and actually WRITE something then you should own this book. After reading all the bad reviews and comments about Blake Snyder, I couldn't believe they were so wrong, even if they had a reasonable point; but Blake really makes it happen in this book, and I am glad I bought it because it helped me write what I wouldn't and couldn't. It stopped me from procrastinating and now I have so much more space in my head after I already laid out about 7 scripts from my head. His method is different, but it's fun. I love it. This is so much easier now, I don't have an excuse to NOT write!!! This book has been my greatest motivator and mentor. I wish I could've bought it 3 yrs ago! If you're a beginner... you should get it. If you're stuck in a script then you should also get it. Trust me. Be open minded and give it a shot. Instead of being critical. Your missing piece might be in this book.
gerrigee More than 1 year ago
I recently became an intern for a writer's agency in L.A. and found this book the be all, end all study guide highlighting the "rules" of screenwriting that are absolutely required to get a screenplay read in Hollywood. Synder presents priceless insider knowledge in an entertaining easily understood manner. A must for any aspiring screenwriter! The author passed away this year and will be missed. His work has proven a valuable resource for the writing community.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Being an aspiring script writer, I've read a lot of books on writing screenplays but this one captured the heart of most of them in a readable and concise way. In fact a couple points, like "Pope in the pool" finally got through to me. But to be honest, I didn't believe his page structure premise at first so I watched a few top selling movies like "The Devil Wears Prada" and saw for myself just how right he is. I have now adjusted my scripts to hit Blake's beats. We'll see how it goes.
NKNK More than 1 year ago
If you're even just thinking about writing a screenplay - you must get this book. The author writes to YOU and has a great approach and gives very great step by step advice on writing your script. Absolutely must have this book on hand.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Best screenwriting structure book EVER!
Bookmobile_Driver More than 1 year ago
I bought this book based on the recommendation of a member of one the book writing groups I belong to. It tells how to write movie scripts, but the friend who told me about it said the same principles could be used to help make novels better. Since I was about halfway through my latest book, I decided to hold off on writing until I studied the techniques described in this book. Snyder, a successful screenwriter who died in 2009, describes how every good movie script is organized. It is an easy-to-understand description of 15 beats along with a description of each beat and how many pages one should have for each beat. Examples are included to make the material even easier to understand. I could see right away how to apply the techniques to novel writing. However, there are two follow-up books, Save the Cat Goes to the Movies and Save the Cat Strikes Back, that I think I better read before finishing the novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great book! It does not tell you that you can do anything and do well. It is designed for those that want to write commerical movies. If you do not follow his rules and you do not try to do the activities you will not sell your script easily. Too bad we are not in the days where they used to be in a bidding war... It is a shame however that we lost the writer so young. I would have loved to email him a couple of times since he was encouraging many to send emails to him. It has really helped me in my process and it is a good follow up to Syd Fields (which I have a 1996 or so edition that I have been reading about using computers.. LOL!).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'd give this book 2 1/2 stars (but you can't seem to give half stars). If you've read a lot of screen writing books you aren't really going to learn anything new. This book is really for those that want to write a screenplay but have no idea on how to develop the story, characters or even how to write one (which begs the question - should you really be writing one?). I found it a little condescending and the author came across as rather conceited. He spends a lot of time talking about his writing and "successes"....and for someone that has only had two movies made (and one was labelled by Sylvester Stallone as the worst movie he's ever done), a lot of the time the book seems like he was just patting himself on the back. Don't get me wrong. There is some useful information in there (like his beat sheet) but it's no better or worse than a dozen other books on the market (I’d recommend Story by Robert Mckee if you want a learn how to develop your story and characters).
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