Save Twilight: Selected Poems

Overview

The power of Eros, the enduring beauty of art, a love-hate nostalgia for his Argentine homeland, the bonds of friendship and the tragic folly of politics are some of the themes of Save Twilight. Informed by his immersion in world literature, music, art, and history, and most of his own emotional geography, Cortázar’s poetry traces his paradoxical evolution from provincial Argentinean sophisticate to cosmopolitan Parisian Romantic, always maintaining the sense of astonishment of an artist surprised by life.

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Overview

The power of Eros, the enduring beauty of art, a love-hate nostalgia for his Argentine homeland, the bonds of friendship and the tragic folly of politics are some of the themes of Save Twilight. Informed by his immersion in world literature, music, art, and history, and most of his own emotional geography, Cortázar’s poetry traces his paradoxical evolution from provincial Argentinean sophisticate to cosmopolitan Parisian Romantic, always maintaining the sense of astonishment of an artist surprised by life.

"Selections from Cortâazar's 1984 collection Salvo el crepâusculo (see HLAS 50:3601), including prose commentaries from that volume. En face. Highly accomplished, colloquial translations. Short translator's preface; biographical note. Selection 'attempts to represent the range of Cortâazar's poetic accomplishment' without traditional organization, following original volume's method. Excellent contribution to bibliography"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780872863330
  • Publisher: City Lights Books
  • Publication date: 1/1/2001
  • Language: Spanish
  • Series: City Lights Pocket Poets Series , #53
  • Pages: 172
  • Sales rank: 1,094,013
  • Product dimensions: 4.80 (w) x 6.30 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Julio Cortázar was born in Brussels, Belgium, of Argentine parents abroad on business. When he was four years old, his family returned to Buenos Aires, where he grew up in a suburb. Cortázar attended the Escuela Normal de Profesores Mariano Acosta, a teachers' training college. In 1935 he received a degree as a secondary-level teacher. He studied then two years at the University of Buenos Aires and taught in secondary schools in Bolívar, Chivilcoy, and Mendoza. In 1944-45 he was a professor of French literature at the University of Cuyo, Mendoza. Cortázar joined there a protest against Peron and was briefly imprisoned. After being released Cortázar left his post at the university. From 1946 to 1948 he was a director of a publishing company in Buenos Aires. He passed examinations in law and languages and worked then as a translator. In 1951, in opposition to Peron's regime, Cortázar travelled to Paris, where he lived until his death. In 1953 he married Aurora Bernárdez. They separated and Cortázar lived with Carol Dunlop in later years. From 1952 he worked for UNESCO as a freelance translator. He translated among others Robinson Crusoe and stories of Edgar Allan Poe into Spanish - Poe's influence is also evident in his work.

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Table of Contents

Translator's Preface
To Be Read in the Interrogative 3
The Good Boy 5
A Love Letter 7
After the Party 9
The Future 11
Nocturne 13
Chronicle for Caesar 15
The Gods 21
Air of the South 23
A friend tells me... 25
Time's Distribution 31
Polychrony 33
Get a Move on 37
The Hero 53
To a God Unknown 57
Profit and Loss 63
Pocket Poems... 65
The Knitters 67
Blue Funk 73
Sidewalks of Buenos Aires 75
Maybe the Most Beloved 77
Milonga 79
The Brief Love 81
After Such Pleasures 83
Happy New Year 85
One tradition that lasts... 87
Friends 89
The Other 91
Law of the Poem 93
A Sonnet in a Pensive Mood 95
The Ceremony 97
A Song for Nina 99
The Happy Child 103
Infinite Voyage 105
Speak, You Have Three Minutes 107
Clearance Sale 111
Moths 113
"Le Dome" 115
Clearcut 117
If I'm to Live 119
To a Woman 121
Autumn Summary 125
Poem 127
Stele at a Crossroads 129
Most of what follows... 133
The Visit 137
Dream on Fearlessly, Friend 139
Inflation Lies 143
The Getaway Polka 147
Return Trip 149
In an old Buenos Aires... 151
Background 153
The Pretender 165
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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 1999

    Cortazar was a great poet too

    I was very astonished at Julio Cortazar's power to write poetry; not because I never expected him to write poetry, but because he was known mainly for his fiction. That he wrote poetry makes a lot of sense to me now, especially since 'Hopscotch''s first chapter (76?) is undoubtedly the most beautiful prose poem ever written. The poem I liked the most of this collection was 'Clearcut.' It is perhaps the best love poem ever written--cunning, deadly, grotesque even, but splendid, and oh so beautiful.

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