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Saveur Cooks Authentic American: Celibrating the Recipes and Diverse Traditions of Our Rich Heritage
     

Saveur Cooks Authentic American: Celibrating the Recipes and Diverse Traditions of Our Rich Heritage

by Colman Andrews, Christopher Hirsheimer (Photographer), Dorothy Kalins
 
Authentic recipes, excellent stories, and fantastic photographs have made Saveur magazine a sensation. In just three award-winning years, it has established itself among those with discriminating tastes, enjoying a circulation of over 330,000. Chronicle Books is proud to present Saveur's first cookbook, a glorious look at food traditions and innovations

Overview

Authentic recipes, excellent stories, and fantastic photographs have made Saveur magazine a sensation. In just three award-winning years, it has established itself among those with discriminating tastes, enjoying a circulation of over 330,000. Chronicle Books is proud to present Saveur's first cookbook, a glorious look at food traditions and innovations throughout America. In 175 recipes and more than 400 color photographs, we visit kitchens across the country in search of great food: Old World Italian cooking in San Francisco's North Beach, original fusion cuisine in Hawaii, fiery specialties from Louisiana's Acadians, succulent spit-roasted lamb at a Greek Orthodox Easter in New York. In-depth and wonderfully varied, this is American cuisine in all its diverse flavors. Featuring outstanding food writing and recipes as well as luscious on-site photography and food and technique shots, Saveur Cooks Authentic American is a fascinating gastronomic journey. This colorful celebration of eating well is a sumptuous addition to any cook's library.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Saveur Cooks Authentic American

Reviews From:

The New York Times

San Francisco Examiner

The Boston Globe

From: New York Times

No matter what the recipes here may produce, the results appear irresistible in this pictorial celebration of American regional cooking. Even the macaroni and cheese made with good old Wisconsin cheddar looks like a gourmet special.

From: San Francisco Examiner Magazine

In the summer of 1994 the first issue of Saveur arrived in the mailboxes of America's clued-in foodies. This was a new kind of food magazine, full of stunning photographs picturing authentic cuisine from around the world and the residents who cook them. A celebration of culinary anthropology, the publication fell somewhere between National Geographic and Gourmet magazines. It was an immediate hit. (Let me just say that I have every issue stacked in my office.)

Though international in scope, Saveur covers American cooking in-depth, concentrating on distinctive regional pockets (Tex-Mex border, New Bedford Portuguese) or beloved American ingredients (head lettuce; Vidalia onions). After four years of bi-monthy publication, Saveur's editors were able to collect enough American pieces to create a handsome collection, Saveur Cooks Authentic American

The work is a glossy volume of art-book quality color photography, as only Chronicle Books can produce, interspersed with sidebars and simple recipes laid out in Saveur's signature style vivacious images with a soupcon of eye-pleasing text. Once you pick up Saveur Cooks Authentic American, you can't put it down. This is food porn at its most riveting.

It is one of the most sensually exciting cookbooks I've seen--and one of the most fun to browse.

Like the magazine that inspired it, this is a gorgeous book, with color photographs on every page. There are close-ups of food, as well as depictions of the people who contributed or inspired recipes, and archival photos tracking American meals from decades ago. But looks aren't everything, especially when it comes to cookbooks. Fortunately, the recipes here are also appealing. They are accompanied by introductory notes and sidebars, information that documents the source of a particular dish, such as Chuck's three-day chowder, from a Plymouth resident, or Tutu-Man's chicken with teriyaki sauce, from a Hawaiian native. The book stresses the diversity of our nation of immigrants, and dishes with flavors from around the world make appearances, along with classics such as sweet potato casserole and barbecued ribs.

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt
Even the macaroni and cheese. . .looks like a gourmet special.
-- The New York Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780811821605
Publisher:
Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date:
09/01/1998
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
1.00(w) x 1.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Read an Excerpt




Chapter One


SOUPS

"Plymouth, Massachusetts, is a
community that takes chowder pretty
seriously. There are chowder societies,
chowder festivals, chowder-themed boat
races, and even (or so my grandmother Ruth
always believed) a chowder day: Wednesday.
In this part of New England, chowder
is more than a soup; it's a way of life."

—Miles Chapin on chowder (see recipe on page 33)


RECIPES

SUMMER VEGETABLE SOUP, page 25; LIMA BEAN SOUP, page 26; CRANBERRY BEAN SOUP,
page 29; PUMPKIN SOUP WITH SAGE, page 30; CHUCK'S THREE-DAY FISH CHOWDER, page 33; LOBSTER AND
CORN CHOWDER, page 34; AUNT GILLIE'S MATZO BALL SOUP, page 36; SAIMIN, page 39; BEEF BORSCHT, page 40


Summer
Vegetable Soup

Serves 6


Like Italy's minestrone and other classic vegetable soups, this dish depends for its success on the use of a variety of the freshest, most flavorful vegetables available.


6 cups vegetable stock (recipe follows)
1 large carrot, peeled and diced ¼ lb. green beans, trimmed and cut into 1" pieces 1 small bulb fennel, thinly sliced (tops reserved for garnish)
6 small red or white new potatoes, sliced
2 small yellow or green summer squash, diced
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
6 sprigs fresh parsley
6 sprigs fresh chervil

VEGETABLE STOCK:
3 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
2 mediumyellow onions, peeled and chopped
6 cloves garlic, crushed and peeled (see Note)
1 large leek, trimmed and chopped
1 large carrot, chopped
2 stalks celery, chopped
1 bulb fennel, chopped
3 plum tomatoes
1 cup dry white wine
5 sprigs parsley
6 black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
Salt

1. Bring stock to a simmer in a large pot over medium heat. Add carrots, beans, fennel, potatoes, and squash to stock, then cover and gently simmer until vegetables are soft, about 20 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Ladle into individual bowls and garnish with reserved fennel tops and parsley and chervil sprigs.

VEGETABLE STOCK: Heat oil in a large pot over medium-low heat, add onions, garlic, leeks, carrots, celery, fennel, and tomatoes and cook, stirring frequently, for 15 minutes. Add wine, 7 cups water, parsley, peppercorns, and bay leaf. Bring to a boil, skimming off any foam. Reduce heat to low, then cover and simmer for 45 minutes. Remove from heat then strain stock and discard solids. Season to taste with salt. If not using immediately, refrigerate or freeze. Makes about 6 cups.

NOTE: Peeling Garlic—Separate cloves from head, then lay them on a cutting board and crush with the flat side of a knife blade. The papery peel will easily pull away from the garlic clove.


Lima Bean Soup

Serves 8


We created this thick, rich, satisfying soup—which can be served as a kind of lima-bean vichyssoise—in the hopes that it would help convert limaphobes to the earthy flavors of this much maligned vegetable.


3 tbsp. butter
1 medium yellow onion, peeled and chopped
4 cups baby lima beans, fresh or frozen
2 large potatoes, peeled and diced
8 cups chicken stock (recipe follows)
Salt and freshly ground white pepper
¼ cup chopped fresh mint leaves
½ cup crème fraîche (optional)

CHICKEN STOCK:
1 3-lb. chicken
2 carrots, chopped
2 stalks celery, chopped
1 medium yellow onion, peeled and chopped
6 black peppercorns
Salt


1. Melt butter in a heavy saucepan over medium heat. Add onions and cook, stirring often, until soft, about 10 minutes.

2. Increase heat to high, add lima beans, potatoes, and chicken stock, then cover and bring to a boil. Reduce to medium heat and simmer until potatoes are soft, about 15 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, remove ½ cup of the vegetables and set aside for garnish. Continue to cook remaining vegetables until they are easily mashed against the side of the pot.

3. Purée vegetables with the stock in a food processor. Strain, then season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve hot or cold, garnished with reserved vegetables, mint leaves, and, if you like, crème fraîche. The soup will thicken when chilled; thin to desired consistency with cold chicken stock or water.

CHICKEN STOCK: Place the chicken, carrots, celery, onions, and peppercorns in a large stockpot with 3 quarts of water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, 2-3 hours, occasionally skimming foam. (After 1 hour, you may remove chicken, pick meat from the bones to reserve for another use, and return carcass to the pot.) Remove from heat, then strain stock and discard solids. Season to taste with salt. If not using immediately, refrigerate or freeze. Makes 8 cups (2 quarts).


Cranberry
Bean Soup

Serves 6


When writer Eugenia Bone accompanies her father, Ed Giobbi (facing page and right)—himself author of several classic books on Italian cooking—on shopping trips to Arthur Avenue, she reconnects with her family's roots, and sometimes picks up the fixings for this favorite bean soup.


4 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
2 small yellow onions, peeled and chopped
2 small carrots, peeled and chopped
2 stalks celery, chopped
5 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
3 tbsp. finely chopped fresh parsley
3 tbsp. finely chopped fresh basil
1 ½ lbs. plum tomatoes, peeled and seeded (see page 56, step 1) and chopped
2 cups dried cranberry beans
1 bay leaf
1 tbsp. chopped fresh sage leaves
Salt and freshly ground black pepper


1. Heat oil in a large pot over medium-low heat. Add onions, carrots, and celery and cook until soft, about 15 minutes. Add garlic and 1 tbsp. each of parsley and basil. Cook for another 10 minutes.

2. Add tomatoes and cook 10 minutes more, then add beans, 4 cups water, bay leaf, and sage. Simmer soup over medium heat (adding more water if necessary) until beans are very tender, about 1 ½ hours. Add remaining parsley and basil and season to taste with salt and pepper.


Pumpkin Soup
with Sage

Serves 6


Putting pumpkins in pie, however traditional (and satisfying) that may be, isn't the only good thing to do with them—as this autumnal soup deliciously demonstrates. Look for small, sweet pumpkins like the jack-be-little or delicata—or substitute butternut squash.


1 small pie pumpkin, about 5 lbs.
4 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
6 tbsp. unsalted butter
2 medium yellow onions, peeled and finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
4-6 cups chicken stock (see page 26)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Vegetable oil
18 fresh sage leaves
9 shallots, peeled and halved lengthwise


1. Preheat oven to 350°. Quarter and seed pumpkin, rub flesh with olive oil, and bake on a baking sheet until tender, about 30 minutes. Set aside and allow to cool.

2. Melt 4 tbsp. butter in a heavy stockpot over medium heat. Add onions and garlic and cook, stirring frequently, until onions are soft, about 15 minutes. Meanwhile, scrape flesh from pumpkin. Add to onions and garlic and cook for another 5 minutes.

3. Add 4 cups stock to pot and simmer for 30 minutes. Purée soup in a food processor until smooth, then return it to pot. If necessary, thin with additional stock. Season to taste with salt and pepper, then cover soup and keep warm over lowest heat.

4. Meanwhile, heat about 1 cup vegetable oil in a small pan over medium heat. When oil is hot, fry sage leaves until crisp. Drain leaves on paper towels. Discard oil or reserve for another use.

5. In the same pan, melt remaining 2 tbsp. butter over medium heat and cook shallots until soft and golden, about 15 minutes. To serve, ladle soup into individual bowls and garnish each serving with 3 shallot halves and 3 fried sage leaves.

Meet the Author

Colman Andrews is editor of Saveur and author of Everything on the Table and other cookbooks. He lives in Connecticut.

Dorothy Kalins is editor-in-chief of Saveur and Garden Design magazines. She lives in New York City. Colman Andrews is editor of Saveur and author of Everything on the Table and other cookbooks. He lives in Connecticut.

Christopher Hirsheimer is executive editor of Saveur. Her photos appear in several cookbooks, including Fried and True. She lives in Pennsylvania.

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