Saving Grace

Saving Grace

3.2 4
by Annie Jones
     
 

Every year on the night of New Bethany's annual Splendor Belle Gala, reclusive Sera Grayson appears on the porch of her aging antebellum home dressed in a tattered ball gown. Legend holds she is reliving the greatest disappointment of her life: waiting endlessly for the man who stood her up more than fifty years ago. Rosemary, Naomi, Gayle, and Lucy, first…  See more details below

Overview

Every year on the night of New Bethany's annual Splendor Belle Gala, reclusive Sera Grayson appears on the porch of her aging antebellum home dressed in a tattered ball gown. Legend holds she is reliving the greatest disappointment of her life: waiting endlessly for the man who stood her up more than fifty years ago. Rosemary, Naomi, Gayle, and Lucy, first introduced in Jones's Prayer Tree, together decide to help out the eccentric old woman-partly to strengthen their own special bond, threatened by time and the demands of everyday life. Will their joint project instead tear them apart forever?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781576733301
Publisher:
The Doubleday Religious Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/26/1998
Pages:
372
Product dimensions:
5.03(w) x 8.06(h) x 0.94(d)

Meet the Author

Annie Jones is the best-selling author of traditional (sweet) romances and the Palisades romances Irish Eyes and Irish Rogue. She lives in Lexington, Kentucky, with her husband and two children.

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Saving Grace 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Granny-NannyMH More than 1 year ago
This was one of the hardest reads I've ever had. I had a hard time trying to keep up with who was who and which husband was whose and which woman was how old?! Poor Grace was only a "side-line" character. It wasn't until I got to the end and got to the note from the author that I knew this was apparently part of a series. I've accidently picked up a book that was a follow up and never had a problem because the author was kind enough to clue you in or there was no need because it was written as if it was the first with a whole new story line. The only couple i knew for certain was Lucy and Ben. I still can't tell you how old Rose and whatever those other two's names are. It was so slow and the more I waited in anticipation for Grace's story the more frustrating it got. I almost deleted it from my Nook several times and now that it's finished..I will.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Saving Grace is actually the sequal to The Prayer Tree -- however, I have not read the first yet and I loved Saving Grace. It is compelling story of 4 women in different stages of life who are neighbors in a cul-de-sac. They are drawn together through a little boy's terrible illness. This novel really inspired me and made me think. I would highly recommend it.
DeborahHeal More than 1 year ago
I received this ebook from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group to read and honestly review. The following review of Saving Grace should remove any doubt that I am letting a free review copy get in the way of being honest, because to be honest, weak plot structure, confusing point of view switches, and overdone southernisms got in the way of some nice characterization, witty dialogue, and a good story. I was all set to enjoy a good story about the friendship of four women’s friendships but felt cheated. Maybe if I had read the first book (I found out Saving Grace is a sequel only afterward.) I would have been more interested in the plot. But come on! Whether or not to restart the prayer group seems a weak vehicle for the characters to ride. And helping Grace seems like the obvious thing for good Christian women to do, not something they should have to be talked into. And the story was confusing. Other reviewers blamed themselves for not having read the first book. This no doubt would have been helpful, and I suggest you do read it first. But the main reason for the confusion was the bewildering point of view switches. The (rather pointless) prologue sets up the book to be about Naomi and her husband, but then the point of view jumps around among the characters in no consistent, recognizable pattern, making it difficult for the reader to commit to the story. I’ll take the author’s word that the southernisms in the story are authentic. But whether they are or not, they don’t read authentic and are as overdone as red eye gravy on grits. This too gets in the way of the story. Whenever the four women get together, not much real, character- building conversation occurs—just a lot of odd expressions get tossed around in ways that don’t advance the plot. Now with all that negative critique out of the way (for which I am truly sorry), I loved the parts that focused on each individual woman and her man. In those passages, the point of view focuses in on one character long enough for the reader to get caught up in her thoughts and problems. There, the characters become real and the reader wants to know more. There, the excessive southern dialect gets out of the way, and the conversation is clear and true. I especially enjoyed seeing the interaction between Ben and the endearing Lucy. I laughed out loud at several exchanges. I could really sympathize with her embarrassing faux pas and yearning for a husband and children. It is because of such passages that I kept reading Saving Grace and why I plan to check out other titles by Annie Jones.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago