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Saving Our Sons
     

Saving Our Sons

by Marita Golden
 

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When Marita Golden decided to write her personal account of the challenges of raising a black son in today's world, she didn't intend to write more than her own family's story. But through the story of raising her son against the backdrop of a racially divided society, Golden discovered she was also confronting the causes of the violence that surrounds

Overview

When Marita Golden decided to write her personal account of the challenges of raising a black son in today's world, she didn't intend to write more than her own family's story. But through the story of raising her son against the backdrop of a racially divided society, Golden discovered she was also confronting the causes of the violence that surrounds African-American men.

In the fierecely lyrical and revealing narrative of Saving Our Sons, she has created a work of profound and lasting importance−one that sensitively and uniquely addresses the problems of boyhood and emerging manhood. It is a book that issues a clarion call: The survival of our cities, if not our society, depends on our finding a way to save our sons.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
``As the mother of a black son, I have raised my child with a trembling hand that clutches and leads,'' declares novelist Golden (And Do Remember Me). Though her book title is overbroad and her narrative a bit jagged, she crafts a moving story, mainly of raising her son, Michael, whose middle-class status is no badge of protection from cops or peers. With family ties frayed by mobility, Golden has built a community with friends, but is estranged from her Nigerian ex-husband and wonders if Michael suffers without a father figure. In the course of her tale, Golden marries a man Michael likes, and eventually takes her son to a happy reunion with his father in Lagos, Nigeria. She mixes accounts of Michael's struggles in school and his shoplifting episode with meditations on D.C.'s mean streets and meeting the mothers of sons killed by drugs or convicted of murder. Racism must be dismantled, she knows, but she also argues that the ``first line of defense against racism'' is self-discipline. And, she adds, just as forgiving Michael's father was a vital act of motherhood for her, black men and women must practice forgiveness of each other in order to help save their community. (Jan.)
Library Journal
In a sensitive and beautifully written autobiographical testimony, novelist Golden (Long Distance Life, LJ 9/1/89) interweaves diary entries with her exploration of what it means to parent a black male adolescent in the turmoil of today's society. Her understanding is heightened by the fact that for the first decade of his life she raised her son in Nigeria, a country largely free of racism and violence that reveres young males. Golden's fears and hopes make the problems of crime and violence, racism, and parenting very real. A book whose readership should not be limited to African Americans, this is strongly recommended for every library. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 9/1/94.]-Kay Brodie, Chesapeake College, Wye Mills, Md.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385473033
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/28/1995
Pages:
212
Sales rank:
1,376,569
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.50(d)

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