Saving the Breakout: The Thirtieth Division's Heroic Stand at Mortain, August 7-12, 1944

Overview

From the very first page, the American infantryman is the hero of this magnificent account of men at war. For five days in August 1944, the fate of the Allied campaign in Normandy longed on the refusal of a relative handful of men to give up the tiny village of Mortain despite a massive German counterattack there. Yet the history books are mostly silent about this momentous battle. It contradicts the satisfying picture of an Allied juggernaut rolling effortlessly from victory to victory across France. Now at last...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (19) from $3.58   
  • New (1) from $65.00   
  • Used (18) from $3.58   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$65.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(113)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

From the very first page, the American infantryman is the hero of this magnificent account of men at war. For five days in August 1944, the fate of the Allied campaign in Normandy longed on the refusal of a relative handful of men to give up the tiny village of Mortain despite a massive German counterattack there. Yet the history books are mostly silent about this momentous battle. It contradicts the satisfying picture of an Allied juggernaut rolling effortlessly from victory to victory across France. Now at last Mortain receives its due. Hitler gambled the fate of France on his counterattack there. Had he been successful, the Allies might well have been rolled back to the Normandy beaches. But American National Guardsmen of the 30th Infantry Division held on for five days against overwhelming odds, and the Allied victory in France was assured. The story is told largely in the words of the men who fought the battle. The author sets his account firmly in the context of the Normandy landing and provides the big picture, so that we can understand the importance of Mortain. Along the way, he disposes of a couple of myths. Contrary to the assertions of Ultra historian F. W. Winterbotham, General Bradley did not have advance warning of the German attack at Mortain. He did not lay a trap for the Germans there but reacted as best he could to events as they unfolded. It was the common infantryman who blunted the thrust and bought Bradley the time he needed. Another myth holds that Allied air power won the day at Mortain. But captured Germans confirmed that it was the dogged tenacity of American infantrymen, ably supported by American artillery, that broke the back of the German push.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This dramatic military history recounts the little-known WW II defense of the French town of Mortain by the 30th Division, a National Guard outfit whose troops hailed mostly from Tennessee and the Carolinas. By stopping the German counteroffensive at Mortain, the ``Old Hickory'' Division saved the D-Day invasion forces from being pushed back to the Normandy beaches and gave the Allied high command enough time to bring pressure against both flanks of the German thrust. Featherston, a journalist with the Durham, N.C., Herald-Sun , reviews the controversy over Gen. Omar Bradley's failure to close the gap, a measure that would have encircled large German formations in France and shortened the war. Two German armies escaped through the so-called Falaise Gap but, as the author points out, the Allies took 50,000 prisoners and counted 10,000 enemy dead. It was a great Allied victory--made possible by the heroic stand of the 30th Division at Mortain. Featherston's superb narrative illuminates the overall strategic situation while concentrating on that division's lonely struggle. His account explains why S.L.A. Marshall, the Army's official historian, picked the 30th as the finest division in the European theater. Illustrations. (May)
Library Journal
American National Guard units have often been disparaged for their combat performance during World War II. This book, by a veteran journalist for the Durham, North Carolina, Herald Sun , sets the record straight in dramatic fashion for at least one such outfit, the 30th ``Old Hickory'' Infantry Division. For several days, one of its regiments heroically fought off a major German counterattack designed to roll back the Normandy invasion. Like all unit histories, this one is stuffed with names, personalities, and hometowns, but the action is fast-moving and will captivate the general reader. Featherston takes the 30th from its founding through its final battles and ends up with a useful study of a typical wartime citizen-soldier outfit. For most libraries.-- Raymond L. Puffer, U.S. Air Force History Prog., Los Angeles
Roland Green
A popular account, largely based on eyewitness reports, of the stand of the U.S. Army's 30th Infantry Division at Mortain in Normandy in early Aug_. 1944. The heroic defense of Mortain critically delayed the last and most dangerous German offensive in France, and may have saved Patton's Third Army or even the Normandy beachhead itself. This is definitely war from the infantryman's viewpoint. It is also a useful addition to the body of material on just how closely controlled the Normandy campaign was--revisionist in the best (nonpolitical) sense of the word. A likely purchase for medium or large military and World War II collections.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780891414902
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 6/1/1993
  • Pages: 304

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)