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Saving the Jews: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Holocaust
     

Saving the Jews: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Holocaust

by Robert N. Rosen, Alan M. Dershowitz (Afterword), Gerhard Weinberg (Foreword by)
 

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Since the 1960s, when a post-World War II generation of historians came of age, the answer has seemed increasingly that FDR was close to being an antisemite. After all, the Holocaust took place on FDR's watch. Why didn't the Allies simply bomb the camps? But now, in a rigorously researched narrative and interpretive history, the record of the Roosevelt administration

Overview

Since the 1960s, when a post-World War II generation of historians came of age, the answer has seemed increasingly that FDR was close to being an antisemite. After all, the Holocaust took place on FDR's watch. Why didn't the Allies simply bomb the camps? But now, in a rigorously researched narrative and interpretive history, the record of the Roosevelt administration is indisputably laid bare. A fearless example of historical detective work, Saving the Jews lays to rest once and for all the canard that Roosevelt abandoned the Jews of Europe and that America was a passive, callous bystander to the Holocaust.

About the Author:
Robert Rosen is a lawyer in Charleston, South Carolina

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Was FDR an indifferent or possibly anti-Semitic president who abandoned European Jews, or was he a pragmatic leader who understood that the key to saving the Jews was winning WWII as swiftly as possible? This bloated, repetitious volume reads like one long apology as it takes on the so-called "revisionist" historians who question FDR's good will; it concludes that he should be "honored for [his] actions during World War II, not defamed." According to Rosen (The Jewish Confederates), FDR may have told ethnic jokes about Jews, but he also surrounded himself with Jewish friends and advisers like Henry Morgenthau Jr. FDR didn't have the political clout to change American immigration laws, and two-thirds of the refugees on the SS St. Louis, who were refused entry to the U.S. in 1939, are believed to have survived the war. Roosevelt probably didn't know about requests by various Jewish leaders to bomb Auschwitz, an action that, Rosen says would have killed Anne Frank and other innocents. Although Rosen is able to debunk some of the more overheated claims put forth four decades ago by Arthur Morse in While Six Million Died, his often simplistic arguments don't undo landmark works like David Wyman's The Abandonment of the Jews. (May) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Independent scholar Rosen (The Jewish Confederates) seeks to correct what he regards as a major imbalance in the historiography of the United States and the Holocaust. Over the past generation, the American government and President Franklin D. Roosevelt have been subjected to withering criticism for having abandoned the Jews of Europe. Rosen rejects this interpretation and instead lauds FDR as a friend of the Jewish people but one who had to operate under a number of political and logistical constraints. Rosen makes several trenchant points. First, we should redirect our anger at the massacres away from ourselves and toward the Nazis and their active supporters. We should also remember that FDR inherited the restrictive immigration policies enacted in 1924 and that the President's job is to enforce the law, not break it. Although some will likely reject his interpretation, Rosen's research is impressive, and he takes into account the crucial domestic context, specifically the rising level of American anti-Semitism, along with the physical constraints that could prevent rescue operations. It is worth remembering that it was almost an entire year after D-day before the Allied armies actually reached the camps. Recommended for all libraries.-Frederic Krome, Jacob Rader Marcus Ctr. of the American Jewish Archives, Cincinnati Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781560257783
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
03/28/2006
Pages:
688
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.30(h) x 2.30(d)

Meet the Author

Robert N. Rosen is the author of A Short History of Charleston; Confederate Charleston: An Illustrated History of the City adn the People During the Civil War; The Jewish Confederates, and most recently Charleston: A Crossroads of History with Isabella Leland. He is a lawyer in Charleston, Sout Carolina, and holds an MA in history from Harvard University.

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