Savoring Southeast Asia

Savoring Southeast Asia

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by Joyce Jue, Marlene McLoughlin, Chuck Williams
     
 

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*Contains more than 135 authentic recipes
*Profusely illustrated with evocative scenic and food photography, charming watercolors, and a hand-drawn map
*Top international photographers capture unusual and unexpected subjects, from sweeping landscapes to architectural details
*Every recipe is photographed as a finished dish  See more details below

Overview

*Contains more than 135 authentic recipes
*Profusely illustrated with evocative scenic and food photography, charming watercolors, and a hand-drawn map
*Top international photographers capture unusual and unexpected subjects, from sweeping landscapes to architectural details
*Every recipe is photographed as a finished dish

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Savoring Southeast Asia showcases the dazzling cuisines of Southeast Asia through its collection of 130 authentic recipes gathered by Jue (Asian Flavors and Far East Caf : The Best of Casual Asian Cooking). It shares some similarities with another recent cookbook; Hot Sour Salty Sweet: A Culinary Journey Through Southeast Asia (LJ 11/15/00). Both titles are similarly priced, both have gorgeous color photographs that bring this part of the world to the reader's doorstep, both have a glossary of ingredients, and with their mix of recipes and essays on cuisines and cultures both appeal not only to cooks but also to armchair travelers. Hot Sour Salty Sweet does offer more recipes, but it limits its focus to the Mekong River region, while Savoring Southeast Asia includes dishes from Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Singapore. The individual recipes included in each of these cookbooks vary greatly, and even when the same dish is covered, such as Sticky Rice with Mangos, there are enough subtle differences that choosing just one would be difficult. Recommended for all public libraries. John Charles, Scottsdale P.L., AZ Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780737020434
Publisher:
Time-Life Custom Publishing
Publication date:
11/01/2000
Series:
Savoring Series
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
8.95(w) x 13.15(h) x 1.04(d)

Read an Excerpt

Tom Kha Gai (Chicken Coconut Soup)

This spectacular soup is one of Thailand's best-known dishes. It is easy to make and includes many of the ingredients that distinguish classic Thai cooking: lemongrass, galangal, fish sauce, kaffir lime, chiles, and coconut milk. I like the soup made with chunks of chicken on the bone, but you may use boneless if you prefer. Do not eat galangal, lemongrass, and lime leaves. They deliver a bouquet of flavors but are far too tough to consume.

1 whole chicken breast, chopped into 1-inch
(2.5-cm) pieces on the bone
2 cups (16fl oz/500 ml) chicken stock
3 cups (24 fl oz/750 ml) coconut milk
10 slices fresh galangal or 5 slices dried galangal
4 stalks lemongrass, tender midsection only and cut into 2-inch (5-cm) lengths
6 green Thai chiles or 8 green serrano chiles, cut in half crosswise
8 kaffir lime leaves, spines removed
1/2 cup (3 1/2 oz/105 g) drained canned straw mushrooms
1/2 cup (2 oz/60 g) sliced bamboo shoots
3 tablespoons fish sauce
1/4 cup (2fl oz/60 ml) fresh lime juice, or to taste
1/4 cup (1/4 oz/7 g) fresh coriander (cilantro) leaves

In a large saucepan, combine the chicken, chicken stock, coconut milk, galangal, lemongrass, chiles, and lime leaves. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to maintain a gentle boil and cook, uncovered for 20 minutes.

Add the mushrooms and bamboo shoots, stir well, raise the heat to high, and bring to a boil. Add the fish sauce and lime juice, then taste and adjust the seasonings. Ladle the soup into warmed bowls, garnish with coriander, and serve.

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Savoring Southeast Asia 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago