Say Goodbye to America:The Sensational and Untold Story behind the Assassination of John F. Kennedy

Overview

In the last decade, there has been much research into the exact events surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy. According to new information gathered and assessed by Matthew Smith, JFK was murdered on orders emanating from the ?alternative? government?the Establishment?which catered to ?big business? and which Kennedy was in the process of divesting of power in favor of a government that put people first. The President?s new priorities won him few friends in the government, and Smith emphasizes the fact ...

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Overview

In the last decade, there has been much research into the exact events surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy. According to new information gathered and assessed by Matthew Smith, JFK was murdered on orders emanating from the “alternative” government—the Establishment—which catered to “big business” and which Kennedy was in the process of divesting of power in favor of a government that put people first. The President’s new priorities won him few friends in the government, and Smith emphasizes the fact that most of his policies were dismantled within 18 months of his death. Indeed, his decision to withdraw from the early stages of Vietnam was reversed within hours. In Say Goodbye to America, Matthew Smith carefully examines the role of domestic and international business concerns and how government policies swiftly changed after JFK’s assassination—including the engagement in Vietnam, a war that generated “business” to the tune of $200 billion.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781840187410
  • Publisher: Mainstream Publishing Company, Limited
  • Publication date: 9/1/2003
  • Pages: 255
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword 7
Introduction 11
Acknowledgements 13
Chapter 1 The Riddle of a Lifetime 15
Chapter 2 A Busy Day in Dallas 18
Chapter 3 Mayhem 22
Chapter 4 Inexpert Witness 28
Chapter 5 Ambush in Elm Street 32
Chapter 6 Oswald and Tippit 36
Chapter 7 Enter Jack Ruby 43
Chapter 8 The House that Jack Built 50
Chapter 9 Lee Harvey Oswald 53
Chapter 10 The Taming of the Medical Evidence 57
Chapter 11 New Light--Old Shadows 67
Chapter 12 The Trouble With Warren 90
Chapter 13 Curiouser and Curiouser 103
Chapter 14 They Do It with Mirrors 109
Chapter 15 Homecoming 120
Chapter 16 Towards the Root of the Problem 126
Chapter 17 Frame Up 128
Chapter 18 To Fall Among Thieves 131
Chapter 19 Now You See Him ... 138
Chapter 20 Now You Don't ... 144
Chapter 21 Final Touches 148
Chapter 22 Double Vision 157
Chapter 23 Shadows in Mexico 159
Chapter 24 The Cuban Pilot 162
Chapter 25 The Jolly Green Giant 170
Chapter 26 In Not So Many Words ... 179
Chapter 27 You Can Get More Out of Me 190
Chapter 28 The Evidence Before You ... 198
Chapter 29 Sounds That Drive Against the Wind 204
Chapter 30 Silent Witnesses 211
Chapter 31 Letters and Other Documents 220
Chapter 32 Say Goodbye to America 232
Bibliography 244
Name Index 246
Subject Index 253
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2008

    A reviewer

    This book is a literate road trip through the well known hills and peaks of the assassination, with a surprising number of 'gems' thrown in. Smith, with a tone of both sadness and tenacity, displays an impressive knowledge, both broad and deep, of the assassination and its background. Replete with interesting exhibits and documentation, the book excels in providing concise discourse, while showcasing the author's considerable intelligence and wit. Many of his forays and explorations are accentuated with old letters, news items, printed pages and photographs that he finds noteworthy. These act as simple, but clarifying, corroborations of many key points. Most have been seen before, but in conjunction with his analyses, they are most helpful and he is capable of linking them in a manner not before seen. There are numerous reviews of many previously explored things, brought forward, however, with new force and focus. The author's major offering is a talented eye for historical background given short shrift, strange contradictions, odd details that mystify, surprising political facts, asides related to long forgotten personages we perhaps should have investigated more carefully, and many things known, but under-emphasized, in the past. In the reading, no one can deny his eye for the meaningful detail and the nuance that alters old perceptions. In some ways, packed tight and lean, it is really several books in one. His work tends to avoid dry and boring research that maddeningly hammers home point after interminable point in favor of that which is crisp and impactive. To this end, he has an odd verve that comes through on almost every page. The field research related to the Red Bird airfield personnel and the strange goings-on there, overlooked by many investigators, denotes fertile new ground and is most commendable. His chapter on 'Silent Witnesses' is truly haunting. Too, there is a fascinating, if underdeveloped, computer model 'obtained in conjunction with Joachim Markus and others' of the buildings and landscape views, line-of-sight perspectives and relevant angles operative in the Dealey Plaza of 1964. This computer material should be expanded, colorized and the Lincoln limo re-drawn to show the jump seat Connally sat in 'and its counterpart, used by his wife' placed another 6' off the sidewall of the car for fullest accuracy. Overall, his contribution to the body of work is welcome and noteworthy. Sometimes, when viewing something from afar, greater is the insight when compared to the witness on the curb. While he cannot resist a somewhat plaintive denouement that lauds the memory of the slain President, one can forgive the emotion in favor of his charming and obviously sincere pity for America in its loss.

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