Say It Plain: A Century of Great African American Speeches

Say It Plain: A Century of Great African American Speeches

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by Catherine Ellis
     
 

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Say It Plain is a vivid, moving portrait of how black Americans have sounded the charge against injustice, exhorting the country to live up to its democratic principles. In “full-throated public oratory, the kind that can stir the soul” (Minneapolis Star Tribune), this unique anthology collects the transcribed speeches of the twentieth century

Overview

Say It Plain is a vivid, moving portrait of how black Americans have sounded the charge against injustice, exhorting the country to live up to its democratic principles. In “full-throated public oratory, the kind that can stir the soul” (Minneapolis Star Tribune), this unique anthology collects the transcribed speeches of the twentieth century’s leading African American cultural, literary, and political figures, many of them never before available in printed form.

From an 1895 speech by Booker T. Washington to Julian Bond’s harp assessment of school segregation on the fiftieth anniversary of Brown v. Board in 2004, the collection captures a powerful tradition of oratory—by political activists, civil rights organizers, celebrities, and religious leaders—going back more than a century.

The paperback edition includes the text of each speech along with an introduction placing it in its historical context. Say It Plain is a remarkable historical record—from the back-to-Africa movement to the civil rights era and the rise of black nationalism and beyond—riveting in its power to convey the black freedom struggle.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781595587435
Publisher:
New Press, The
Publication date:
05/10/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
254
File size:
436 KB

Meet the Author


Catherine Ellis is the founder of Audio Memoir, an oral history service that captures her clients’ personal and professional stories using techniques honed by decades of interviewing and broadcast experience. A longtime producer for American Radio Works®, Ellis has covered twentieth-century American race relations and critical events such as Hurricane Katrina and the Great Recession. She is a co-editor (with Stephen Drury Smith) of Say It Plain: A Century of Great African American Speeches and Say It Loud: Great Speeches on Civil Rights and African American Identity and (with Peter Bearman, Stephen Drury Smith, and Mary Marshall Clark) of After the Fall: New Yorkers Remember September 2001 and the Years That Followed, all published by The New Press. Ellis holds a PhD in anthropology from Columbia University, where she studied the competing memories of Jim Crow segregation in the South. She lives in Belmont, Massachusetts.

Stephen Drury Smith is the executive editor and host of American RadioWorks®, the acclaimed national documentary series from American Public Media®. He has covered a wide range of international and domestic issues, including human rights, science and health, education, race relations, and American history. He is a co-editor (with Catherine Ellis) of Say It Plain: A Century of Great African American Speeches and Say It Loud: Great Speeches on Civil Rights and African American Identity and (with Mary Marshall Clark, Peter Bearman, and Catherine Ellis) of After the Fall: New Yorkers Remember September 2001 and the Years That Followed, all published by The New Press. He lives in St. Paul, Minnesota and Boston, Massachusetts.

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Say It Plain: A Century of Great African American Speeches 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Starting my own pride by
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