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Saying Goodbye to Warsaw
     

Saying Goodbye to Warsaw

4.3 3
by Michael Cargill
 

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Like any girl who is loved by her family, Abigail Nussbaum loves to chase butterflies, enjoys lying on her back looking for shapes in the clouds, and happily teaches young children to make daisy chains.

In the eyes of certain people, however, Abigail has committed a heinous crime. The year is 1940; the place is Poland; Abigail happens to be Jewish.

Along with half

Overview

Like any girl who is loved by her family, Abigail Nussbaum loves to chase butterflies, enjoys lying on her back looking for shapes in the clouds, and happily teaches young children to make daisy chains.

In the eyes of certain people, however, Abigail has committed a heinous crime. The year is 1940; the place is Poland; Abigail happens to be Jewish.

Along with half a million other Jews, Abigail and her family are evicted from their home and forced to live in the bombed out ruins of Warsaw, the Polish capital.

Although a handful decide to fight back, is the uprising strong enough to save Abigail's spirit?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781492364962
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
09/08/2013
Pages:
170
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.39(d)

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Saying Goodbye to Warsaw 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
AndreaClunesVelasquez More than 1 year ago
It took me a long time to finally get to a point where I could read this book at ease. I try to read somewhat "thematically" and it wasn't until now that I finally reached the World Wars theme, so I hadn't had a chance to check this, my first Michael Cargill book, out. I started reading it right after finishing "The Book Thief", which left me absolutely speechless and amazed, so I was kind of worried that anything I read after it would be kind of overshadowed by the greatness of that novel. But picking "Saying Goodbye to Warsaw" was an excellent choice because it turned out to be one of the best books I've ever read regarding the World War II topic. At first, I felt the story would be kind of stereotypical: yet another story of Jews suffering under the Nazi regime. However, as I flipped through the pages, I began to get immersed in the story the author created, got to know his characters and discovered the little things that made this book unique and special. I particularly enjoyed the ending. It was so utterly unexpected and shocking! I wouldn't have guessed it would end like that even if they'd paid me to do it. It was incredible! And, in a few pages, my whole impression of the book changed and I was left utterly in awe. I won't give anymore details so I don't spoil the surprise and interest for anyone. I will only say that I'm grateful I got to read this book (and in Paperback edition too!), I'm happy I could finally read it and I'm very pleasantly surprised by the story Michael Cargill gave us, how he did it and how it ended. If you like World War II stories, give this book a shot. It's worth every single penny! :D
CherylM-M More than 1 year ago
For some reason I thought Abigail was a teenager of perhaps 14/15 yrs of age. I actually went back and checked. Then I realised that her 'voice' sounded older than her years. Jaded by experience and forced to be more mature than she should have to be at the age of nine. Ripped from her safe and comfortable existence and thrust into the bowels of hell. The way she speaks about her surroundings suggests a level of denial of her reality, which would explain why her story often sounds as if the unfolding events are insignificant and not worth worrying about. So instead of the grimy, desperate and gruesome truth of the Warsaw Ghetto the reader experiences Abigail's version of life as she sees it.  That sense of being there and not emotionally attached to the situation was an aspect that bothered me. It could be the intended scenario or aura that the author wanted to create, if not then the author wasn't able to create an empathic connection between the story, the character and the reader. I was both surprised and a little disappointed by the ending. There was suddenly a sense of frivolous adventure, which didn't gel well with the previous story-line or the setting. Balancing a story between the history of the holocaust and the fictional plot can be tricky. The fictional story should never be perceived as making light of the historical truth of that time.   I received a copy of this book courtesy of the author.
DiiMI More than 1 year ago
What started as an endearing tale of the capacity of a young Jewish girl to endure the brutality of the Nazis and keep her sense of wonder with the universe has left me shell-shocked. Saying Goodbye to Warsaw by gifted author Michael Cargill makes a dynamic statement to the horrors of war, persecution, genocide and the will to fight back against all odds, at any cost. The setting is bleak, Jews forced to live crowded into the hulking remains of old neighborhoods, like lambs being herded for slaughter. Michael Cargill doesn’t just pen a story of the plight of a young Jewish girl and her family, he stages each scene with such clarity and feeling that I was there, on those sad streets, watching people become a mere shadow of themselves, fighting for food and survival. Abigail has just turned ten. What could she have done to deserve the twisted wrath of the Nazis? How could she hold the joy of life and living so vibrantly living as she and her family must? Abigail’s brother, Leo is her protector, her guardian, who sees that she gets food to fuel her body and tries to be the buffer between her young world and reality, fueling her imagination and gentle demeanor. How much is too much for a young mind? At what point does reality come crashing in and vengeance take over? Is there a turning point or is it a culmination of events that put Leo and then Abigail on a path they cannot turn back from? I am astounded at the Mr. Cargill’s capacity to give us characters who spoke to my soul, gained my heart and respect, as I feared for what could happen to them. His dialogue flows between characters with a realism that will have you hanging on every single word. Saying Goodbye to Warsaw is one of those books that takes history and makes it personal, never once stopping to cover any festering sores. I won’t forget this book or its people, or the events they endured. I highly recommend this as a book you will NOT want to miss, but I will warn you, you will be mentally and emotionally haunted.