Scarecrow

Scarecrow

4.3 81
by Matthew Reilly, Sean Mangan
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

It is the greatest bounty hunt in history. The targets are the finest warriors in the world—commandos, spies, terrorists. And they must all be dead by 12 noon, today. The price on their heads: almost $20 million each.

Among the names, one stands out. The enigmatic Marine, Shane Schofield, who goes by the call-sign "Scarecrow." Schofield is plunged into a

Overview

It is the greatest bounty hunt in history. The targets are the finest warriors in the world—commandos, spies, terrorists. And they must all be dead by 12 noon, today. The price on their heads: almost $20 million each.

Among the names, one stands out. The enigmatic Marine, Shane Schofield, who goes by the call-sign "Scarecrow." Schofield is plunged into a race around the world, pursued by a fearsome collection of international bounty hunters. The race is on and the pace is frantic as he fights for survival, in the process unveiling a vast international conspiracy and the terrible reason why he cannot, under any circumstances, be allowed to live!

He led his men into hell in Ice Station. He protected the President against all odds in Area 7. But this time it's different, because he is the target. With all of his trademark action, Matthew Reilly continues to establish himself as one of the top thriller writers of today.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The seemingly indestructible Marine captain Shane "Scarecrow" Schofield returns in this high-octane adventure from Reilly (Area 7, etc.). This time out, Schofield finds himself, along with 14 other members of the world's most elite military units, being hunted by a seemingly endless army of bounty hunters. The prize for the hunters is $18.6 million per head, and all 15 heads must be taken within six days. The search for the person behind this bounty hunt takes Schofield and his loyal band of marines around the world and in and out of one life-threatening situation after another. Reilly knows exactly what kind of book he's writing. His heroes are brave and self-sacrificing, his villains are bloodthirsty and ruthless, and the fate of the world hangs in the balance. Narrator Sowers is in perfect synch with Reilly's storytelling. Obviously enjoying himself, he knows just what words to punch in order to get the most out of each action-packed sentence, and he supports his Clint Eastwood-like delivery of Schofield's dialogue by giving each of the numerous secondary characters their own distinct voices and accents. Those who like their adventures fast and furious will not be disappointed by this energetic production. Simultaneous release with the St. Martin's/Dunne hardcover (Forecasts, Jan. 26). (Mar.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Reilly's latest slam-bang actioner delivers more thrills than most other adventure novels. Shane Schofield, a.k.a. Scarecrow and the hero of Ice Station and Area 7, finds himself on a hit list of 12 men, all members of elite military units from around the globe. A bounty of $18.6 million a head spurs the hopes of professional assassins. There's only one catch-the men on the list must be dead by noon on October 26th, Eastern Standard Time. The novel starts three hours before the deadline and is essentially one long action scene-a bold experiment. Plot points and exposition occur even as Scarecrow fights for his life, creating a tale that never lets the hero, or the reader, take a breath. Overall, this is an over-the-top roller-coaster ride that would make a pulse-pounding movie if you had a budget of $6 billion. For all fiction collections.-Jeff Ayers, Seattle P.L. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Third installment in the way, way over-the-top action adventures of US Marine Shane "Scarecrow" Schofield, and the best yet from this Australian author (Contest, 2003, etc.). Called Scarecrow because of his disfigured eyes, Schofield and a crack crew of Delta Force soldiers rush to a Siberian sub repair base that's been overrun by Islamic terrorists who have seized a cache of nuclear missiles. But instead of terrorists, Schofield finds a trap set by competing teams of international bounty hunters who've already killed two Delta Force soldiers on an $18.6 million-per-head kill list that also has Schofield's name on it. The list of 15 super-soldiers, spies, scientists and one terrorist was complied by Majestic 12, a secret council of supremely rich multinational military industrial complex tycoons who not only buy and sell governments but have been responsible for every late-20th-century conspiracy from the assassination of JFK to Clinton's impeachment trial-except for 9/11. Thus begins a serious of breathless, thoroughly contrived, but immensely entertaining action scenes in which Schofield, fellow soldiers Libby Gant, Book II, and Mother join with bounty hunter Aloysius Knight (being paid by an anonymous client to protect Schofield) and Knight's trusty pilot Rufus as they take on killer sharks, fancy sports cars, helicopters, jet aircraft, a supertanker, an entire aircraft carrier, X-15 rocket planes, and the combined air forces of five African nations to stop a plot to pit rival countries against each other and plunge the world into anarchy. The action is so accomplished that we don't care about cheesy Star Wars dialogue, as when Jay Killian, the Ralph Lauren-wearing head of amultinational arms-manufacturing company, mercilessly guillotines one of Schofield's buddies and Schofield vows to "kill them all." An endless stream of interchangeable bad guys wind up "deader than disco," and everyone agrees when the US President intones of Schofield that "the fate of the free world could be resting on that man's shoulders." Superb print version of a video game shoot-'em-up. Agent: Eugenie Furniss/William Morris UK
From the Publisher

“Matt Reilly, the pedal-to-the-metal action novelist...can inspire awe. Speed demons, take note.” —Publishers Weekly on Area 7

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781486230518
Publisher:
Bolinda Audio
Publication date:
12/30/2014
Series:
Shane Schofield Series, #3
Edition description:
Unabridged
Sales rank:
1,040,405
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 5.50(h) x 1.12(d)

Read an Excerpt

Scarecrow


By Matthew Reilly

St. Martin's Press

Copyright © 2003 Matthew Reilly
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4299-0819-1



CHAPTER 1

First Attack


Siberia
26 October 0900 Hours (Local Time)
E.S.T. (New York, USA) 2100 Hours (25 Oct)


Modern international bounty hunters bear many similarities to their forbears in the Old American West.

There are the lone wolf bounty hunters — usually ex-military types, freelance assassins or fugitives from justice themselves, they are lone operators known for their idiosyncratic weapons, vehicles or methods.

There are the organizations — companies that make the hunting of fugitive human beings a business. With their quasi-military infrastructures, mercenary organizations are often drawn to participate in international human hunts.

And, of course, there are the opportunists — special forces units that go AWOL and undertake bounty hunting activities; or law enforcement officials who find the lure of a private bounty more enticing than their legal obligations.

But the complexities of modern bounty hunting are not to be discounted. It is not unknown for a bounty hunter to act in concert with a national government that wants to distance itself from certain acts. Nor is it unknown for bounty hunters to have tacit agreements with member states for sanctuary as payment for a previous "job."

For, in the end, one thing about them is clear; international borders mean little to the international bounty hunter.

United Nations White Paper: Non-Government
Forces in UN Peacekeeping Zones,

OCTOBER 2001 (UN PRESS, NEW YORK)


Airspace above Siberia
26 October, 0900 hours local time
(2100 hours E.S.T. USA, 25 October)


The airplane rocketed through the sky at the speed of sound.

Despite the fact that it was a large plane, it didn't show up on any radar screens. And even though it was breaking the sound barrier, it didn't create any sonic booms — a recent development in wave-negativing sensors took care of that.

With its angry-browed cockpit windows, its black radar-absorbent paint and its unique flying-wing design, the B-2 Stealth Bomber didn't normally fly missions like this.

It was designed to carry 40,000 pounds of ordnance, from laser-guided bombs to air-launched thermonuclear cruise missiles.

Today, however, it carried no bombs.

Today its bomb bay had been modified to convey a light but unusual payload: one fast-attack vehicle and eight United States Marines.


As he stood in the cockpit of the speeding Stealth Bomber, Captain Shane M. Schofield was unaware of the fact that, as of six days previously, he had become a target in the greatest bounty hunt in history.

The gray Siberian sky was reflected in the silver lenses of his wraparound anti-flash glasses. The glasses concealed a pair of vertical scars that cut down across Schofield's eyes, wounds from a previous mission and the source of his operational nickname: Scarecrow.

At five-feet-ten-inches tall, Schofield was lean and muscular. Under his white-gray Kevlar helmet, he had spiky black hair and a creased handsome face. He was known for his sharp mind, his cool head under pressure, and the high regard in which he was held by lower-ranking Marines — he was a leader who looked out for his men. Rumor had it he was also the grandson of the great Michael Schofield, a Marine whose exploits in the Second World War were the stuff of Marine Corps legend.

The B-2 zoomed through the sky, heading for a distant corner of northern Russia, to an abandoned Soviet installation on the barren coast of Siberia.

Its official Soviet name had been "Krask-8: Penal and Maintenance Installation," the outermost of eight compounds surrounding the Arctic town of Krask. In the imaginative Soviet tradition, the compounds had been named Krask-1, Krask-2, Krask-3 and so on.

Until four days ago, Krask-8 had been known simply as a long-forgotten ex-Soviet outstation — a half-gulag, half–maintenance facility at which political prisoners had been forced to work. There were hundreds of such facilities dotted around the former Soviet Union — giant, ugly, oil-stained monoliths which before 1991 had formed the industrial heart of the USSR, but which now lay dormant, left to rot in the snow, the ghost towns of the Cold War.

But two days ago, on October 24, all that had changed.

Because on that day, a team of thirty well-armed and well-trained Islamic Chechen terrorists had taken over Krask-8 and announced to the Russian government that they intended to fire four SS-18 nuclear missiles — missiles that had simply been left in their silos at the site with the fall of the Soviets in 1991 — on Moscow unless Russia withdrew its troops from Chechnya and declared the breakaway republic an independent state.

A deadline was set for 10 a.m. today, October 26.

The date had meaning. October 26 was a year to the day since a force of crack Russian troops had stormed a Moscow theater held by Chechen terrorists, ending a three-day siege, killing all the terrorists and over a hundred hostages.

That today also happened to be the first day of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, a traditional day of peace, didn't seem to bother these Islamist terrorists.

The fact that Krask-8 was something more than just a relic of the Cold War was also news to the Russian government.

After some investigation of long-sealed Soviet records, the terrorists' claims had proved to be correct. It turned out that Krask-8 was a secret that the old Communist regime had failed to inform the new government about during the transition to democracy.

It did indeed house nuclear missiles — sixteen to be exact; sixteen SS-18 nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missiles; all contained in concealed underground silos that had been designed to evade US satellite detection. Apparently, "clones" of Krask-8 — identical missile-launch sites disguised as industrial facilities — could also be found in old Soviet client states like the Sudan, Syria, Cuba and Yemen.

And so, in the new world order — post–Cold War, post–September 11 — the Russians had called on the Americans to help.

As a rapid response, the American government had sent to Krask-8 a fast-and-light counter-terrorist unit from Delta Detachment — led by Specialists Greg Farrell and Dean McCabe.

Reinforcements would arrive later, the first of which was this team, a point unit of United States Marines led by Captain Shane M. Schofield.


Schofield strode into the bomb bay of the plane, breathing through a high-altitude face-mask.

He was met by the sight of a medium-sized cargo container, inside of which sat a Fast Attack "Commando Scout" vehicle. Arguably the lightest and fastest armored vehicle in service, it looked like a cross between a sports car and a Humvee.

And inside the sleek vehicle, strapped tightly into their seats, sat seven Recon Marines, the other members of Schofield's team. All were dressed in white-gray body armor, white-gray helmets, white-gray battle dress uniforms. And they all stared intently forward, game faces on.

As Schofield watched their serious expressions, he was once again taken aback by their youth. It was strange, but at 33 he felt decidedly old in their presence.

He nodded to the nearest man. "Hey, Whip. How's the hand?"

"Why, er, it's great, sir," Corporal Whip Whiting said, surprised. He'd been shot in the hand during a fierce gun battle in the Tora Bora mountains in early 2002, but since that day Whip and Schofield hadn't worked together. "The docs said you saved my index finger. If you hadn't told them to splint it, it would have grown in a hook shape. To be honest, I didn't think you'd remember, sir."

Schofield's eyes gleamed. "I always remember."

Apart from one member of the unit, this wasn't his regular team.

His usual team of Marines — Libby "Fox" Gant and Gena "Mother" Newman — were currently operating in the mountains of northern Afghanistan, hunting for the terrorist leader and longtime No. 2 to Osama bin Laden, Hassan Mohammad Zawahiri.

Gant, fresh from Officer Candidate School and now a First Lieutenant, was leading a Recon Unit in Afghanistan. Mother, an experienced Gunnery Sergeant who had helped Schofield himself when he was a young officer, was acting as her Team Chief.

Schofield was supposed to be joining them, but at the last minute he'd been diverted from Afghanistan to lead this unexpected mission.

The only one of his regulars that Schofield had been able to bring with him was a young sergeant named Buck Riley, Jr., call-sign "Book II." Silent and brooding and possessed of an intensity that belied his 25 years, Book II was a seriously tough-as-nails warrior. And as far as Schofield was concerned, with his heavy-browed face and battered pug nose, he was looking more and more like his father — the original "Book" Riley — every day.

Schofield keyed his satellite radio, spoke into the VibraMike strapped around his throat. Rather than pick up actual spoken words, the vibration-sensing microphone picked up the reverberations of his voice box. The satellite uplink system driving it was the brand-new GSX-9 — the most advanced communications system in use in the US military. In theory, a portable GSX-9 unit like Schofield's could broadcast a clear signal halfway around the world with crystal clarity.

"Base, this is Mustang 3," he said. "Sitrep?"

A voice came over his earpiece. It was the voice of an Air Force radio operator stationed at McColl Air Force Base in Alaska, the communications center for this mission.

"Mustang 3, this is Base. Mustang 1 and Mustang 2 have engaged the enemy. Report that they have seized the missile silos and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy. Mustang 1 is holding the silos and awaiting reinforcements. Mustang 2 reports that there are still at least twelve enemy agents putting up a fight in the main maintenance building."

"All right," Schofield said, "what about our follow-up?"

"An entire company of Army Rangers from Fort Lewis is en route, Scarecrow. One hundred men, approximately one hour behind you."

"Good."

Book II spoke from inside the armored Scout vehicle. "What's the story, Scarecrow?"

Schofield turned. "We're go for drop."


Five minutes later, the box-shaped cargo-container dropped out of the belly of the Stealth Bomber and plummeted like a stone toward the Earth.

Inside the container — in the car resting inside it — sat Schofield and his seven Marines, shuddering and jolting with the vibrations of the terminal-velocity fall.

Schofield watched the numbers on a digital wall-mounted altimeter whizzing downward:

50,000 feet ...

45,000 feet ...

40,000 ... 30,000 ... 20,000 ... 10,000 ...

"Preparing to engage chutes at five thousand feet ..." Corporal Max "Clark" Kent, the loadmaster, said in a neutral voice. "GPS guidance system has us right on target for landing. External cameras verify that the LZ is clear."

Schofield eyed the fast-ticking altimeter.

8,000 feet ...

7,000 feet ...

6,000 feet ...

If everything went to plan, they would land about fifteen miles due east of Krask-8, just over the horizon from the installation, out of sight of the facility.

"Engaging primary chutes ... now," Clark announced.

The jolt that the falling container received was shocking in its force. The whole falling box lurched sharply and Schofield and his Marines all shuddered in their seats, held in by their six-point seat belts and rollbars.

And suddenly they were floating, care of the container's three directional parachutes.

"How're we doing, Clark?" Schofield asked.

Clark was guiding them with the aid of a joystick and the container's external cameras.

"Ten seconds. I'm aiming for a dirt track in the middle of the valley. Brace yourselves for landing in three ... two ... one ..."

Whump!

The container hit solid ground, and suddenly its entire front wall just fell open and daylight flooded in through the wide aperture and the four-wheel-drive Commando Scout Light Attack Vehicle skidded off the mark and raced out of the container's belly into the gray Siberian day.

The Scout whipped along a muddy earthen track, bounded on both sides by snow-covered hills. Deathly gray tree skeletons lined the slopes. Black rocks stabbed upward through the carpet of snow.

Stark. Brutal. And cold as hell.

Welcome to Siberia.

As he sat in the back of the Light Attack Vehicle, Schofield spoke into his throat-mike: "Mustang 1, this is Mustang 3. Do you copy?"

No reply.

"I say again: Mustang 1, this is Mustang 3. Do you copy?"

Nothing.

He did the same for the second Delta team, Mustang 2. Again, no reply.

Schofield keyed the satellite frequency, spoke to Alaska: "Base, this is 3. I can't raise either Mustang 1 or Mustang 2. Do you have contact?"

"Ah, affirmative on that, Scarecrow," the voice from Alaska said. "I was just talking to them a moment ago —"

The signal exploded to hash.

"Clark?" Schofield said.

"Sorry, Boss, signal's gone," Clark said from the Scout's wall console. "We lost 'em. Damn, I thought these new satellite receivers were supposed to be incorruptible."

Schofield frowned, concerned. "Jamming signals?"

"No. Not a one. We're in clear radio airspace. Nothing should be affecting that signal. Must be something at the other end."

"Something at the other end ..." Schofield bit his lip. "Famous last words."

"Sir," the Scout's driver, a grizzled old sergeant named "Bull" Simcox, said, "we should be coming into visual range in about thirty seconds."

Schofield looked forward, out over Simcox's shoulder.

He saw the black muddy track rushing by beneath the Scout's armored hood, saw that they were approaching the crest of a hill.

Beyond that hill, lay Krask-8.


At that same moment, inside a high-tech radio receiving room at McColl Air Force Base in Alaska, the young radio officer who had been in contact with Schofield looked about himself in confusion. His name was Bradsen, James Bradsen.

A few seconds before, completely without warning, the power to the communications facility had been abruptly cut.

The base commander at McColl strode into the room.

"Sir," Bradsen said. "We just —"

"I know, son," the CO said. "I know."

It was then that Bradsen saw another man standing behind his base commander.

Bradsen had never seen this other man before. Tall and solid, he had carrot-red hair and an ugly rat-like face. He wore a plain suit and his black eyes never blinked. They just took in the entire room with a cool unblinking stare. Everything about him screamed ISS.

The base commander said, "Sorry, Bradsen. Intelligence issue. This mission has been taken out of our hands."


The Scout attack vehicle crested the hill.

Inside it, Schofield drew a breath.

Before him, in all its glory, lay Krask-8.

It stood in the center of a wide flat plain, a cluster of snow-covered buildings — hangars, storage sheds, a gigantic maintenance warehouse, even one 15-story glass-and-concrete office tower. A miniature cityscape.

The whole compound was surrounded by a 20-foot-high razor wire fence, and in the distance beyond it, perhaps two miles away, Schofield could see the northern coastline of Russia and the waves of the Arctic Ocean.

Needless to say, the post–Cold War world hadn't been kind to Krask-8.

The entire mini-city was deserted.

Snow covered the complex's half-dozen streets. Off to Schofield's right, giant mounds of the stuff slouched against the walls of the main maintenance warehouse — a structure the size of four football fields.

To the left of the massive shed, connected to it by an enclosed bridge, stood the office tower. Enormous downward-creeping claws of ice hung off its flat roof, frozen in place, defying gravity.

The cold itself had taken its toll, too. Without an anti-freeze crew on site, nearly every window pane at Krask-8 had contracted and cracked. Now, every glass surface lay shattered or spider-webbed, the stinging Siberian wind whistling through it all with impunity.

It was a ghost town.

And somewhere underneath it all lay sixteen nuclear missiles.

The Scout roared through the already blasted-open gates of Krask-8 at a cool 80 kilometers an hour.

It shot down a sloping road toward the complex, one of Schofield's Marines now perched in the 7.62mm machine-gun turret mounted on the rear of the sleek armored car.

Inside the Scout, Schofield hovered behind Clark, peering at the young corporal's computer screen.

"Check for their locators," he said. "We have to find out where those D-boys are."

Clark tapped away at his keyboard, bringing up some computer maps of Krask-8.

One map showed the complex from a side-view:

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Two clusters of blinking red dots could be seen: one set on the ground floor of the office tower and a second set inside the massive maintenance shed.

The two Delta teams.

But something was wrong with this image.

None of the blinking dots was moving.

All of them were ominously still.

Schofield felt a chill on the back of his neck.

"Bull," he said softly, "take Whip, Tommy and Hastings. Check out the office tower. I'll take Book II, Clark and Rooster and secure the maintenance building."

"Roger that, Scarecrow."

The Scout rushed down a narrow deserted street, passing underneath concrete walkways, blasting through the mounds of snow that lay everywhere.

It skidded to a halt outside the gargantuan maintenance warehouse, right in front of a small personnel door.

The rear hatch of the Scout was flung open and immediately Schofield and three snow-camouflaged Marines leaped out of it and bolted for the door.

No sooner were they out than the Scout peeled away, heading for the glass office tower next door.

* * *

Schofield entered the maintenance building gun-first.

He carried a Heckler & Koch MP-7, the successor to the old MP-5. The MP-7 was a short-barrelled machine pistol, compact but powerful. In addition to the MP-7, Schofield carried a Desert Eagle semi-automatic pistol, a K-Bar knife and, in a holster on his back, an Armalite MH-12 Maghook — a magnetic grappling hook that was fired from a double-gripped gun-like launcher.

In addition to his standard kit, for this mission Schofield carried some extra firepower — six high-powered Thermite-Amatol demolition charges. Each handheld charge had the explosive ability to level an entire building.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Scarecrow by Matthew Reilly. Copyright © 2003 Matthew Reilly. Excerpted by permission of St. Martin's Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Matthew Reilly was born in Sydney in 1974 and studied Law at the University of New South Wales. After being rejected by every major publisher in Australia, Matthew self-published his first novel Contest and went on to secure a contract with Pan Macmillan. His first novel, Ice Station, was a runaway success. His achievements in Australia have now been repeated internationally with his novels becoming bestsellers in fourteen countries and nine languages. Film rights to Ice Station were optioned to Paramount Pictures in 2002. He has written both screenplays and magazine articles and has also directed three short films.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Scarecrow 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 81 reviews.
Ladytas More than 1 year ago
If you want reality and a plausible plot stick to non-fiction. I personally pick up a Reilly book when I want to "watch" explosions. I don't care if things are realistic, I don't know any better. I do know that no Matthew Reilly novel ever fails to make my heart race, and this one actually made me cry and throw my book across the room. The character development isn't great, but for me the characters are only there to fill the spaces between explosions, gun shots and crashes. Any book by Reilly is a fun read, just don't analyze it and go with the flow.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really enjoy this author, but the publisher should recall this version and fix the page turn errors in the formatting. I am 100 pages in and have had to use the "go to page #" function at least 15 times. TOTALLY UNACCEPTABLE. Nook books and ebooks have been around long enough that this sort of thing should not happen. It ruins the reader's enjoyment of the book. And for those who think that's not what a review should address, think again. Poor sales drive decisions and readers should not pay for substandard work. Would anyone buy a hard copy that has pages out of order or stuck together? Heck no. So don't buy this messed up electronic version.
adleno More than 1 year ago
This was an entertaining book that has almost too much action.
ThrillerDude More than 1 year ago
Shane Scofield is a marked man in this lighting-fast adventure. Reilly actually takes it up a notch, if you can believe it, and there's not a single 'catch my breath' moment in the story. The downside is, there's too many "...and just at that exact moment..." lines and escapes that stretch believability too far, even for this kind of book. I still loved the book, but I hate occasionally feeling like I'm reading a comic book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I couldn't put this book down!!! It was THAT good and THAT exciting! There was action on every page!!! I love how Scarecrow's marines are completely loyal to him and would give up their lives without hesitation to protect him. The scene where Mother and the Scarecrow fight was amazing! I specifically loved the dialogue afterwards. I had to reread that part several times because it was so touching! Great book! I am now rereading Ice Station and have just purchased the prequel Area 7. Waiting for the next Scarecrow book!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Reilly has let all his readers down with a plot so impossible that only comic book characters could accomplish the tasks. The actions are so implausible that the story becomes ridiculous. Don't waste time on this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having read every book by this author, I will never read another one after suffering through this 'Dick and Jane' primer. This story has no reality and makes no sense what so ever. This book is simply a comic book in paperback form. Don't waste your time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This tale should properly be called 'graphic fiction.' All that's missing are the illustrations and the 'Crash! Zap! Boom!' Far too contrived to merit the price of admission.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is so focused on action that it is missing the narrative portion that creates a world that envelops the reader and draws him/her in. I never felt that the characters were facing a particular crisis like Temple or Ice Station, just loosely strung together action sequences that include lots of exclamation points. If you skip this one you won't miss anything.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love Reilly's books, and this was a fun read, but he goes too far with driving the pace of the action. The plot is paper thin, and the characters are cardboard cutouts, with the exception of Scarecrow and Mother. There's always a certain suspension of belief required when reading in this genre, but Reilly carries some of the escapes to Roadrunner/Coyote level. He also overdoes it with the italicized '...and at that VERY moment..' Buy it in hardcover if you're a Reilly fanatic, otherwise wait for paperback.
Anonymous 8 months ago
I have enjoyed all of this series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great action. Fun story. Can't wait for more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One star is as low as I can vote. Action packed for sure, but not even comic book lovers could buy into this "plot". The enemy can shoot half a million rounds and never hit him, he just throws his gun up and kills two with every shot. Totally unbelievable. Ex: (Mag hooks can't stick to aluminum airplane skins)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
But Reilly is a bigot.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Action supreme, thrilling and exciting!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Matt is really good. All of his books are really entertaining and gripping. I would highly recommend 7 deadly wonders, 6 sacred stones and 5 greatest warriors. I love the character of jack west jr... excuse me, huntsman. Anyways i havent completly read this book but i have heard a lot about it and i know it would be well worth your time to read any matthew reilly books. The one and only thing i would change about his books is the language. To much swearing... but that is the only... wait nope. I changed my mind. Too much detail of the end of people's lives... eyeballs comimg out, peices of flesh on the end of a sword, blood covering everything... i have a very imaginative mond so as i read i picture these things in my head... and i have a photograpic memory so those images dont go away... its kinda nasty... but hey i cant change what he writes... im not hatin but no me gusta... swaggie. 1D
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jay_Green_ABQ More than 1 year ago
Matthew Reilly is one of my all time favorite authors. All of his Scarecrow series books are great.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago