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The Scarecrow of Oz (Oz Series #9) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Lyman Frank Baum (1856-1919) was an American writer of children's books, best known for creating the marvelous Land of Oz in "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz". This fanciful kingdom was catalogued in a series of children's books beginning with the publication of "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz". Baum's Oz series compasses the first fully developed fantasy world created by an American author. In 1900, Baum and Denslow, famous illustrator with whom he shared the copyright, published "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz", making it ...
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The Scarecrow of Oz (Oz Series #9)

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Overview

Lyman Frank Baum (1856-1919) was an American writer of children's books, best known for creating the marvelous Land of Oz in "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz". This fanciful kingdom was catalogued in a series of children's books beginning with the publication of "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz". Baum's Oz series compasses the first fully developed fantasy world created by an American author. In 1900, Baum and Denslow, famous illustrator with whom he shared the copyright, published "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz", making it one of the first commercially successful uses of color illustrations in American publishing. Dorothy and her friends soon began their journey toward becoming an integral part of the American consciousness. "The Scarecrow of Oz" is the ninth book to the Land of Oz series. This story tells of the Scarecrows efforts at helping characters Captain Bill and Trot on their journey to Oz to overthrow the evil King Krewl of Jinxland. "The Scarecrow of Oz" was a way for Baum to introduce readers to another one of his book series ("The Sea Fairies" and "Sky Island").

The adventures of Trot and Cap'n Bill take them to Oz where they help solve the problem of Pom, whose truelove's heart has been turned to ice by witches.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781596250444
  • Publisher: Neeland Media LLC
  • Publication date: 10/4/2011
  • Series: Oz Series , #9
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

L. Frank Baum (1856-1919) published The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900 and received enormous, immediate success. Baum went on to write seventeen additional novels in the Oz series. Today, he is considered the father of the American fairy tale. His stories inspired the 1939 classic film The Wizard of Oz, one of the most widely viewed movies of all time.

Michael Sieben is a professional designer and illustrator, primarily within the sub-culture of skateboarding, whose work has been exhibited and reviewed worldwide as well as featured in numerous illustration anthologies. He is a staff writer and illustrator for Thrasher magazine, and a weekly columnist for VICE.com. He is also a founding member of Okay Mountain Gallery and Collective in Austin, Texas, as well as the cofounder of Roger Skateboards. The author of There's Nothing Wrong with You (Hopefully), he lives and works in Austin.

John R. Neill was born in Philadelphia in 1877. In 1904, at the age of twenty-six, Neill received his first major book assignment, as illustrator for The Marvelous Land of Oz. From then until his death in 1943, Neill would illustrate over forty Oz books, including three he wrote himself. Today, his fabulous illustrations are synonymous with Oz.

Biography

Dorothy, Toto, the Scarecrow, Aunt Em -- where would our national psyche be without The Wonderful Wizard of Oz? L. Frank Baum, who created a story with an indelible, sometimes haunting impression on so many people, led a life that had a fairy-tale quality of its own.

Baum was born in 1856 to a family that had made a fortune in the oil business. Because he had a heart condition, his parents arranged for him to be tutored privately at the family’s Syracuse estate, “Roselawn.” As an adult, though, Baum flourished and failed at a dizzying variety of ventures, from writing plays to a stint with his family’s medicinal oil business (where he produced a potion called “Baum’s Castorine”), to managing a general store, to editing the Aberdeen Pioneer in Aberdeen, South Dakota. In 1897, following his mother-in-law’s advice, Baum wrote down the stories that he told his children. The firm of Way & Williams published the stories under the title Mother Goose in Prose, with illustrations by Maxfield Parrish, and Baum’s career as a writer was launched.

With the publication of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900, Baum gained instant success. The book, lavishly produced and featuring voluptuous illustrations by William Wallace Denslow, was the bestselling children’s book of the year. It also set a new standard for children’s literature. As a commentator for the September 8, 1900 New York Times described it, “The crudeness that was characteristic of the oldtime publications...would now be enough to cause the modern child to yell with rage and vigor...” The reviewer praised the book’s sheer entertainment value (its “bright and joyous atmosphere”) and likened it to The Story of the Three Bears for its enduring value. As the film industry emerged in the following years, few books were as manifestly destined for adaptation, and although it took almost four decades for a movie studio to translate Baum’s vision to film, the 1939 film did for the movies what Baum’s book had done for children’s literature: that is, raised the imaginative and technical bar higher than it had been before.

The loss of parents, the inevitable voyage toward independence, the yearning for home -- in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Baum touched upon a child’s primal experiences while providing a rousing story of adventure. As his health declined, Baum continued the series with 14 more Oz books (his publisher commissioned more by other authors after his death), but none had quite the effect on the reading public that the first one did. Baum died from complications of a stroke in 1919.

Good To Know

Baum founded the National Association of Window Trimmers and published a magazine for the window-trimming trade – he also raised exotic chickens.

Buam was married to Maud Gage, a daughter of the famous women’s rights advocate Matilda Joslyn Gage.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Floyd Akers, Laura Bancroft, George Brooks, Edith Van Dyne, Schuyler Staunton, John Estes Cooke, Suzanne Metcalf, Louis F. Baum, Lyman Frank Baum (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 15, 1856
    2. Place of Birth:
      Chittenango, New York
    1. Date of Death:
      May 6, 1919
    2. Place of Death:
      Hollywood, California

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

The Great Whirlpool

Seems to me, " said Cap'n Bill, as he sat beside Trot under the big acacia tree, looking out over the blue ocean, it seems to me, Trot, as how the more we know, the more we find we don't know."

" I can't quite make that out, Cap'n Bill," answered the little girl in a serious voice, after a moment's thought, during which her eyes followed those of the old sailor-man across the glassy surface of the sea. "Seems to me that all we learn is jus' so much gained."

" I know; it looks that way at first sight," said the sailor, nodding his head; " but those as knows the least have a habit of thinkin' they know all there is to know, while them as knows the most admits what a turr'ble big world this is. It's the knowing ones that realize one lifetime ain't long enough to git more'n a few dips o' the oars of knowledge."

Trot didn't answer. She was a very little girl, with big, solemn eyes and an earnest, simple manner. Cap'n Bill had been her faithful companion for years and had taught her almost everything she knew.

He was a wonderful man, this Cap'n Bill. Not so very old, although his hair was grizzled — what there was of it. Most of his head was bald as an egg and as shiny as oilcloth, and this made his big ears stick out in a funny way. His eyes had a gentle look and were pale blue in color, and his round face was rugged and bronzed. Cap'n Bill's left leg was missing, from the knee down, and that was why the sailor no longer sailed the seas. The wooden leg he wore was good enough to stump around with on land, or even to take Trot out for a row or a sail on the ocean, but when it came to " runnin'up aloft " or performing active duties on shipboard, the old sailor was not equal to the task. The loss of his leg had ruined his career and the old sailor found comfort in devoting himself to the education and companionship of the little girl.

The accident to Cap'n Bill's leg had happened at about the time Trot was born, and ever since that he had lived with Trot's mother as " a star boarder, " having enough money saved up to pay for his weekly

keep." He loved the baby and often held her on his lap; her first ride was on Cap'n Bill's shoulders, for she had no baby-carriage; and when she began to toddle around, the child and the sailor became close comrades and enjoyed many strange adventures together. It is said the fairies had been present at Trot's birth and had marked her forehead with their invisible mystic signs, so that she was able to see and do many wonderful things.

The acacia tree was on top of a high bluff, but a path ran down the bank in a zigzag way to the water's edge, where Cap'n Bill's boat was moored to a rock by means of a stout cable. It had been a hot, sultry afternoon, with scarcely a breath of air stirring, so Cap'n Bill and Trot had been quietly sitting beneath the shade of the tree, waiting for the sun to get low enough for them to take a row.

They had decided to visit one of the great eaves which the waves had washed out of the rocky coast during many years of steady effort. The eaves were a source of continual delight to both the girl and the sailor, who loved to explore their awesome depths. " I b'lieve, Cap'n," remarked Trot, at last, " that it's time for us to start."

The old man cast a shrewd glance at the sky, the sea and the motionless boat. Then he shook his head.

" Mebbe it's time, Trot," he answered, " but I don't jes' like the looks o' things this afternoon."

What's wrong? " she asked wonderingly.

Can't say as to that. Things is too quiet to suit me, that's all. No breeze, not a ripple a-top the water, nary a gull a-flyin' anywhere, an' the end o' the hottest day o' the year. I ain't no weather-prophet, Trot, but any sailor would know the signs is ominous."

" There's nothing wrong that I can see," said Trot.

If there was a cloud in the sky even as big as my thumb, we might worry about it; but-look, Cap'n! — the sky is as clear as can be."

He looked again and nodded.

" P'r'aps we can make the cave, all right," he agreed, not wishing to disappoint her. " It's only a little way out, an' we'll be on the watch; so come along, Trot."

Together they descended the winding path to the beach. It was no trouble for the girl to keep her footing on the steep way, but Cap'n Bill, because of

his wooden leg, had to hold on to rocks and roots now and then to save himself from tumbling. On a level path he was as spry as anyone, but to climb up hill or down required some care.

They reached the boat safely and while Trot was untying the rope Cap'n Bill reached into a crevice of the rock and drew out several tallow candles and a box of wax matches, which he thrust into the capacious pockets of his "sou'wester." This sou'wester was a short coat of oilskin which the old sailor wore on all occasions-when he wore a coat at all-and the pockets always contained a variety of objects, useful and ornamental, which made even Trot wonder where they all came from and why Cap'n Bill should treasure them.

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Customer Reviews

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( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 16 of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2001

    It's the Best Oz book!

    You have to read it! It's the bomb for any age!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 14, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    I just have to leave a review, after reading the earlier 1-star

    I just have to leave a review, after reading the earlier 1-star review, complaining about the book not having illustrations, and saying to wait for the Eltanin Publishing version. People might be confused, because Barnes & Noble is totally screwing up and putting ALL reviews of ALL The Scarecrow of Oz books together. So this review complaining about some OTHER version shows up for the Eltanin version (and vice versa). Anyway, that person was right - get the Eltanin version which is now available for The Scarecrow of Oz. Use my recommendation link, or just search for Eltanin. They include all the illustrations.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2012

    I love this book

    Everybody else that reads this book and thinks its good right a good comment if you thinks its bad right a bad comment.If yall like the Wizards Of Oz yall should like this book because it has the charecter off of the Wizards Of Oz

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2014

    Ok

    It is ok.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 5, 2013

    Loved it

    Another great book from this publisher. These are the best and beautifully done. The illustrations are wonderful. Before purchasing one of the Oz books, make sure it is from Eltanin Publishing. They are the very best versions.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2012

    I got this ebook expecting it would have the illustrations. No i

    I got this ebook expecting it would have the illustrations. No illustrations. Wait for the Eltanin Publications ebook version. They are superior to any other. One star for the missing illustrations.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2012

    Okok

    Okkook

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted April 6, 2012

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    Posted June 17, 2011

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    Posted May 14, 2011

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