Scared in School by Roberta Simpson Brown, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Scared in School

Scared in School

by Roberta Simpson Brown
     
 

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13th Street School, actually an elementary school, middle school, and high school, is located at the corner of 13th Street and Waiting Place. You might call it a magnet school, but instead of attracting the gifted and talented, it draws the creepy and warped.

Overview

13th Street School, actually an elementary school, middle school, and high school, is located at the corner of 13th Street and Waiting Place. You might call it a magnet school, but instead of attracting the gifted and talented, it draws the creepy and warped.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Judy Sasges
An ominous fog shrouds the elementary, middle, and high schools located at 13th Street and Waiting Place. Some of the students experience a premonition of evil as they pass through the doors. Evil lurks within the schools' walls and outlying areas. Disappearing students and faculty are abducted by aliens, eaten by giant snails, or murdered during the school year-all in cartoonish, modern, urban legend style. The main characters in this collection of creepy vignettes are siblings Brian, Albert, and Aileen, newcomers to the schools. They do not last long as Albert and Aileen soon vanish into the computer lab, unwilling victims of an alien outreach program called "NoKids." The objective of "NoKids" is to transform human children into computers. Brian is last seen driving toward a light in the woods. Other students meet violent demises. One is crushed by a truck and another is murdered, her body dumped in a vacant lot. The ghost of the school librarian takes her revenge on murderous troublemakers by pushing them out of windows. Animals are tortured and killed yet return to avenge their deaths. This book is disjointed. Some of the stories stand alone, others do not. There are no characters to care about and several of the stories have loose ends. However, readers of scary stories probably will not care. The vignettes are short, evil, and twisted. Chapter titles are often amusing-"The Chill-dren," "Student Bodies," "Extinguished Educators," and others. Brown is the author of Queen of the Cold-Blooded Tales (August House, 1993/VOYA April 1994), which circulates well from my library. This book is aimed at a younger audience and has a mix of evil and humor that middle schoolers will enjoy. VOYA Codes: 2Q 3P M J (Better editing or work by the author might have warranted a 3Q, Will appeal with pushing, Middle School-defined as grades 6 to 8 and Junior High-defined as grades 7 to 9).
School Library Journal
Gr 4-5The best element here is the title. The book is billed as a collection of scary school stories but these tales about alien janitors, people-eating computers, hungry chalkboards, etc., seem thrown together rather than thoughtfully constructed. The format is also confusing. The beginning chapters seem to indicate that strange things will happen to a particular group of children but the focus broadens abruptly, leaving readers baffled. Characters who appeared in earlier chapters disappear without a trace. None of the figures, nor the stories for that matter, evokes much emotion. The tales are all flat and underdeveloped and that's a shame because the seeds for good stories are here. As an oral teller, Brown is superb and her other collections, The Walking Trees (1991) and Queen of the Cold Blooded Tales (1995, both August House), offer deeper, more developed stories. Choose one of them rather than this hodgepodge.Molly S. Kinney, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780874834963
Publisher:
August House Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
12/28/2005
Pages:
141
Product dimensions:
5.41(w) x 8.21(h) x 0.42(d)
Lexile:
780L (what's this?)
Age Range:
11 - 14 Years

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