Scarface [Original Soundtrack]

Scarface [Original Soundtrack]

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Giorgio Moroder did a lot of soundtrack work during the early '80s, and one of his most well-known soundtracks is that of Scarface, the iconic Al Pacino film from 1983. Of all the films Moroder scored, from American Gigolo (1980) and Flashdance (1983) to Electric Dreams (1984) and The Never Ending Story

Overview

Giorgio Moroder did a lot of soundtrack work during the early '80s, and one of his most well-known soundtracks is that of Scarface, the iconic Al Pacino film from 1983. Of all the films Moroder scored, from American Gigolo (1980) and Flashdance (1983) to Electric Dreams (1984) and The Never Ending Story (1984), Scarface is undoubtedly the one that withstood the test of time most impressively, growing in popularity as the years passed (culminating in a well-received DVD reissue in 2003 that probably did more business than the film itself did its first go round). The same cannot be said about the film's soundtrack, however. While each of Moroder's aforementioned soundtracks spun off huge hits -- "Call Me," "Flashdance," "Together in Electric Dreams," and "Never Ending Story" -- Scarface fell more in line with another not-exactly-successful Moroder soundtrack, Metropolis (1984), one that is better known for its dubious taste than its actual music. Regardless, the Scarface soundtrack is indeed well known, even if only because of the film's cult following. But yeah, the music is of dubious taste -- party hardy post-disco synth rock sung by Everywoman divas like Deborah Harry (most notably), Amy Holland (remember her?), and Elizabeth Daily (Valley Girl, anyone?) -- which is precisely what makes Scarface so much sheer fun. Like the film itself, it's just so over the top, so overstylish, so unmistakably 1983 that you can't help but savor the outright absurdity of it all. What an age it was! And few songs embody it as perfectly as Harry's "Rush Rush," a bubbly post-disco ode to yayo (aka llello) that just screams out "early '80s" in fine polyester leisure-suit fashion. Elsewhere, the pair of Daily songs, "Shake It Up" and "I'm Hot Tonight," could be taken seriously, in a Pat Benatar or Patty Smyth kind of way, but they're definitely more enjoyably taken as camp. There's also Moroder's moody side-closing instrumentals, which are actually quite moving -- but still beautifully kitschy. The overall effect is awfully amusing, even if it's one of those novelty CDs you pull out now and then strictly to humor friends (and yourself, somewhat guiltily). Then again, Moroder's craft, as always, is notably distinct for its stylishness, if not for its tastefulness.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/25/2003
Label:
Geffen Records
UPC:
0602498613634
catalogNumber:
000170602
Rank:
832

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Debbie Harry   Track Performer
Giorgio Moroder   Background Vocals,Track Performer,Musician
Beth Andersen   Background Vocals
Arthur Barrow   Track Performer,Musician
Pete Bellotte   Track Performer
Gary Falcone   Background Vocals
Silvester Levay   Musician
Joe Pizzulo   Background Vocals
James Waters   Background Vocals
Richie Zito   Musician
Thomas Schobel   Musician
Dan Walker   Musician
Marie Waters   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Debbie Harry   Composer
Giorgio Moroder   Arranger,Composer,Producer
Arthur Barrow   Arranger,Composer
Pete Bellotte   Composer
Dave Concors   Engineer
Hodges   Engineer
Silvester Levay   Arranger
David Rideau   Engineer
Steve Shepherd   Engineer
Richie Zito   Arranger
George Osaki   Art Direction
Tom Arnholt   Graphic Design
Tim Whitlock   Engineer
Ryan Null   Photo Coordination

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Scarface [Original Soundtrack] 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RAJ1987 More than 1 year ago
The original 1983 version of this soundtrack is excellent however I can't say the same for the 2003 remixed & remastered version. The newly added beats on this version of the soundtrack were done very poorly and do not match with the vocals but simply takes away from the original recordings. It sounds as though Giorgio Moroder was trying give a modern edge to old songs and undeniably failed. So, to anyone who already owns a copy of the original version of this soundtrack don't bother wasting your money trying to get it on CD unless you can find the 1990 CD edition which has not been remixed.