Schindler's List

Schindler's List

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When John Williams received his 29th Academy Award nomination for Schindler's List, he had already won Oscars for Fiddler on the Roof, Jaws, Star Wars, and E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial. He had long been an automatic nominee, but as Hollywood's most honored working composer it was generally believed that it would take an extraordinary…  See more details below

Overview

When John Williams received his 29th Academy Award nomination for Schindler's List, he had already won Oscars for Fiddler on the Roof, Jaws, Star Wars, and E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial. He had long been an automatic nominee, but as Hollywood's most honored working composer it was generally believed that it would take an extraordinary addition to his legacy for the Academy to award Williams a fifth trophy. Schindler's List would prove to be that extraordinary work -- and not just because of the enormous historical and social import of the film and it's subject, though those factors could only have strengthened Williams appeal to Academy voters. Schindler's List feels like his attempt at a magnum opus. Though even simpler in its melodies and themes than some of his famous sweeping popcorn movie scores, it carries the ambition of a major symphonic composition. This is especially true in the segments that are graced with exquisitely rich and evocative violin solos by world famous violinist Itzhak Perlman. Perlman's masterful performances give Williams' compositions an authenticity and grounding that offsets the composer's predilection for sentimentality and bombast. "Restraint" was the word that appeared most frequently in discussions of Steven Spielberg's Holocaust epic. The critical consensus was that the director had managed to depict the horrors of the greatest tragedy in world history without giving in to his customary urges to tug transparently at the heart strings of his audiences. In truth, Spielberg was only able to exercise restraint through the first two and a half hours of the film; he ended up throwing it out the window in the maudlin conclusion. Williams, too, is guilty of indulging in emotional excess. Which isn't surprising when you consider that his music has always been one of Spielberg's most effective heart-tugging tools. Like the film itself, his score is best at its simplest, deriving its emotional power from the events it depicts and bearing in mind that audiences do not need help from filmmakers and composers in order to be emotionally affected by the Holocaust.

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Product Details

Release Date:
12/07/1993
Label:
Mca
UPC:
0008811096922
catalogNumber:
10969
Rank:
497

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Schindler's List 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
GREAT
Guest More than 1 year ago
You thought the music to TITANIC was moving?? You ain't heard nothin' yet. This has got to be one of the most moving, gutt wrenching sound tracks I have ever heard. Every song takes you back to the movie and scenes of concetration camps. Perhaps not the best thing, but who said that we were supposed to forget what happened? Itzac Perlman is in top form, bringing tears to my eyes withing the first track.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What makes Schindler's list the most moving soundtrack ever recorded? Well I can tell you right now it wasn't all because of master John William's elaborate composition. It was the phenomenal violin solos by Itzhak Perlman that brought it to life. His beautiful freehand strokes on the violin are gut-wrenching every time you hear them. The main theme is unforgettable
Guest More than 1 year ago
I absolutely loved this CD- very touching. Not really something that makes you whistle, rather something that makes you *think*
Guest More than 1 year ago
The score for the film is alright I suppose, I thought that it could have been better. I don't like John Williams anyway because all of his stuff seems to sound the same, everytime I hear Star Wars, I think I'm hearing Indians Jones, or E.T. Schindler's List was a ver moving film, but the score seemed to only capture a very little section of the emotional side of the story. Don't get me wrong, the score had its moments of profound emotion that is very much awsome, but I thought that it seemed a little empty, and I feel a bad for saying that because the film is great!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This score not only captures the harsh times of the holocaust but puts you in a state of mind I have never been in before. This is truly John's Finest work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have been an owner of the soundtrack for some time, long before I got a chance to see the movie. The music written by John Williams is so compelling that I sometimes listen to the entire CD three or four times, crying every time. Nothing will move you like this CD, whether you've seen the movie or not. It's a must own!!!