×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Schizophrenia For Dummies
     

Schizophrenia For Dummies

1.5 2
by Jerome Levine, Irene S. Levine
 

See All Formats & Editions

Practical tools for leading a happy, productive life

Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe, and disabling mental disorder that afflicts one percent of the population, an estimated 2.5 million people in America alone. The firsthand advice in this reassuring guide will empower the families and caregivers of schizophrenia patients to take charge, offering expert

Overview

Practical tools for leading a happy, productive life

Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe, and disabling mental disorder that afflicts one percent of the population, an estimated 2.5 million people in America alone. The firsthand advice in this reassuring guide will empower the families and caregivers of schizophrenia patients to take charge, offering expert advice on identifying the warning signs, choosing the right health professional, understanding currently available drugs and those on the horizon (as well as their side effects), and evaluating traditional and alternative therapies.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470444870
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
11/24/2008
Series:
For Dummies Series
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
639,616
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Jerome Levine, MD, is a board-certified psychiatrist whose career has spanned almost 50 years. He is the Deputy Director of the Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research in Orangeburg, New York. Irene S. Levine, PhD, served as the first Deputy Director of the U.S. Center for Mental Health Services. She is a clinical psychologist and an award-winning freelance journalist and author.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Schizophrenia for Dummies 1.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Rossa_Forbes More than 1 year ago
The title, Schizophrenia for Dummies, is, indeed, correct. This book is for dummies, or at least will not further your ability to overcome schizophrenia if you buy what it is selling. To begin with, the cover invites the reader to "learn to help their loved one live a happier, more productive life." How patronizing. Note that there is no mention of the person with schizophrenia learning to help him/herself take charge of their own life. Using the term your loved one when it comes to schizophrenia may at times be necessary but it has the chill of a body on ice. The inside of the book subtly reinforces the idea that your relative is, and will continue to be, managed and dependent. The authors, Irene Levine, Ph.D. and Jerome Levine, M.D. are profoundly indebted, of course, to members of NAMI, an organization which, in my opinion, perpetuates stigma. The book trots out the usual stuff about myth busting such as the myth of split personality, the myth that people with schizophrenia are violent, the myth that bad parenting is the cause. All of these so-called myths have a basis that is conveniently forgotten these days. It is easier to call them myths than to actually figure out the understandable and surprising secrets that underly them. There are excellent and effective holistic therapies that can shine a light on these areas, but these therapies will not be found in this book. There is a cartoon towards the end of the book that sums up the bias of the NAMI-indebted authors towards instilling a take charge of your own life perspective. An aging father is talking to his son in the son's bedroom: "Why don't we talk to your doctor about adjusting your medication, and then see about building that underground railroad to all your friends' homes." Humor is needed, but the message is not encouraging. Dependent, aging child, aging parent. How long is that child/man going to be living at home in the same bedroom he grew up in? The cartoon inadvertently raises the question, if the medications are really all that effective, as the father seems to believe, how come the kid is still delusional?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago