School Counseling and School Social Work Homework Planner

School Counseling and School Social Work Homework Planner

by Sarah Edison Knapp
     
 

Features assignments and exercises to meet the changing needs of school counselors and school social workers

The School Counseling and School Social Work Homework Planner, Second Edition provides you with an array of ready-to-use, between-session assignments designed to fit virtually every therapeutic mode. This easy-to-use sourcebook

Overview

Features assignments and exercises to meet the changing needs of school counselors and school social workers

The School Counseling and School Social Work Homework Planner, Second Edition provides you with an array of ready-to-use, between-session assignments designed to fit virtually every therapeutic mode. This easy-to-use sourcebook features:

  • 75 ready-to-copy exercises covering the most common issues encountered in school settings, such as study and organizational skill deficits and academic motivation/underachievement, as well as "outside" issues such as blended families, divorce, substance abuse, teen pregnancy, and parenting skill deficits
  • A quick-reference format—the interactive assignments are grouped by presenting problems including learning difficulties, disruptive classroom behavior, self-esteem building, bullying, and school violence
  • Expert guidance on how and when to make the most efficient use of the exercises
  • Assignments cross-referenced to The School Counseling and School Social Work Treatment Planner, Second Edition—so you can quickly identify the right exercise for a given situation or problem
  • A CD-ROM that contains all the exercises in a word-processing format—allowing you to customize them to suit you and your clients' unique styles and needs

Additional resources in the Practice Planners® series:

  • Treatment Planners cover all the necessary elements for developing formal treatment plans, including detailed problem definitions, long-term goals, short-term objectives, therapeutic interventions, and DSM™ diagnoses.
  • Documentation Sourcebooks provide the forms and records that mental health professionals need to efficiently run their practice.

For more information on our PracticePlanners® products, including our full line of Treatment Planners, visit us on the web at: www.wiley.com/practiceplanners

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781118410387
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
08/12/2013
Series:
PracticePlanners Series, #321
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
360
Sales rank:
1,137,748
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 10.80(h) x 1.20(d)

Read an Excerpt

School Counseling and School Social Work Homework Planner


John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-471-09114-6


Chapter One

Section I

ACADEMIC MOTIVATION

GOOD NEWS AND BAD NEWS OF MAKING IT IN SCHOOL

GOALS OF THE EXERCISE

1. Recognize that all behavior has consequences.

2. Identify the unconscious goals of underachievement.

3. Identify the hidden fears of achievement.

4. Establish strategies necessary to attain future goals.

ADDITIONAL HOMEWORK THAT MAY BE APPLICABLE TO ACADEMIC MOTIVATION

Career Planning Attributes for a Successful Career Page 118

Responsible Behavior Decision Making Page 275 Training

Oppositional Defiant Responses to Praise, Criticism, Page 223 Disorder (ODD) and Encouragement

School Refusal/Phobia School Days in a Perfect World Page 296

ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS FOR WHICH THIS EXERCISE MAY BE MOST USEFUL

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Attention-Seeking Behavior

Career Planning

Responsible Behavior Training

Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)

SUGGESTIONS FOR USING THIS EXERCISE WITH STUDENT(S)

Every action has consequences. Behaviors that are repeated have consequences that make students feel better or validate their internal view of the world. Many actions have both positive and negative consequences; for instance, skipping a day of school (a strategy for underachievement) may give the student time to relax and watch TV (positive consequences) but also create more work to be completedupon his/her return to school and additional frustration trying to keep up with class discussions (negative consequences). The student who uses a successful school strategy (e.g., working for high grades) may feel a sense of accomplishment, be recognized by teachers and parents, and viewed by peers as smart (positive consequences) but may have higher expectations imposed, be viewed as a nerd, and may have to do more work to maintain a high level of performance (negative consequences).

This activity will help the student recognize the reinforcing consequences of his/her behavior, the unconscious goals of underachievement, and the underlying fears of achievement. Once the reinforcing consequences are identified, the student will be free to determine if current self-defeating behaviors are likely to achieve long-term goals and future expectations. Positive strategies for achievement can then be substituted for strategies that currently contribute to underachievement.

GOOD NEWS AND BAD NEWS OF MAKING IT IN SCHOOL

All behaviors have consequences. Responsible behavior in school helps you successfully complete work assignments, achieve better grades, and progress toward your future goals. Irresponsible behavior in school results in lack of knowledge and failure to reach your long-term goals. However, each behavior has some positive and some negative effects; for instance, although paying attention and raising your hand to participate results in increased knowledge and positive relationships with your classmates and teacher, this self-control takes time and effort. When you weigh the positive and the negative effects of your current behavior, you will be able to determine whether your actions contribute to or detract from the results you want to achieve.

Review the following list of strategies for personal and school achievement and underachievement and add some of your own ideas or strategies. Brainstorm the positive (Good News) and negative (Bad News) consequences of each strategy and record your ideas. Analyze your behavior and compare the strategies you use now to the strategies you will need for meeting your short- and long-term goals.

Strategies for Personal Achievement Good News Bad News

Raising my hand in class: Teacher appreciates I have to wait my turn my self-control

Listening to instructions: I know what I'm I don't get to fool around supposed to do in class

Write the good news and bad news consequences for each strategy. Doing my homework: ________________________ __________________________ Attending school regularly: ________________________ __________________________ Studying for an exam: ________________________ __________________________ Participating in class discussions: ________________________ __________________________

Asking the teacher for help: ________________________ __________________________ Getting tutoring: ________________________ __________________________ Working with a mentor: ________________________ __________________________

Getting an A: ________________________ __________________________

Testing out in math: ________________________ __________________________

Taking execrated classes: ________________________ __________________________

Belonging to an academic club: ________________________ __________________________

College acceptance: ________________________ __________________________

Getting a good job: ________________________ __________________________

________________________ ________________________ __________________________

________________________ ________________________ _________________________

Strategies for Underachievement Good News Bad News

Skipping school: A day of leisure More work to complete at school

Write the good news and bad news consequences for each strategy.

Forgetting homework: ________________________ __________________________

Not participating in class: ________________________ __________________________

Daydreaming: ________________________ __________________________

Being a couch potato or video-game nerd: ________________________ __________________________

Being tardy for class: ________________________ __________________________

Refusing help from the teacher: ________________________ __________________________

________________________ __________________________ __________________________

_______________________ __________________________ __________________________

________________________ __________________________ __________________________

________________________ __________________________ __________________________

________________________ __________________________ __________________________

Strategies I am Currently Using How This Helps Me How This Hurts Me

________________________ _____________________ _____________________

________________________ _____________________ _____________________

________________________ _____________________ _____________________

________________________ _____________________ _____________________

________________________ _____________________ _____________________

________________________ _____________________ _____________________

________________________ _____________________ _____________________

________________________ _____________________ _____________________

________________________ _____________________ _____________________

Strategies I Will Need in the Future How This Will Help Me Achieve my Goals _______________________________________ __________________________________________ _______________________________________ __________________________________________ _______________________________________ __________________________________________ _______________________________________ __________________________________________ _______________________________________ __________________________________________ _______________________________________ __________________________________________

PERSONAL BEST

GOALS OF THE EXERCISE

1. Measure goal achievement in personal terms.

2. Break long-term goals into smaller achievable segments.

3. Affirm self for progress made toward long-term goals.

4. Recognize goal achievement as an ongoing process.

ADDITIONAL HOMEWORK THAT MAY BE APPLICABLE TO GOAL ACHIEVEMENT

Career Planning Attributes for a Successful Career Page 118

Oppositional Defiant Disorder Chore Report Card Page 218 (ODD)

Attention-Seeking Behavior Student Self-Report Page 91

ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS FOR WHICH THIS EXERCISE MAY BE MOST USEFUL

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Learning Difficulties

Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)

Responsible Behavior Training

SUGGESTIONS FOR USING THIS EXERCISE WITH STUDENT(S)

A personal best is an achievement signifying the student's best effort to date. Emphasizing personal best can help students with various talents and abilities experience a sense of accomplishment as they work toward both short- and long-term academic, social/emotional, athletic, or personal goals. Each short-term goal reached becomes a new personal best accomplishment.

This exercise reinforces the idea that goal achievement should be measured in terms of personal progress, not by competing or comparing oneself with family members or other students. Ask the student to select a skill he/she would like to improve (e.g., cursive writing, math, computer applications, spelling, or a foreign language). Assist the student in determining a baseline level of performance (current level of functioning), a specific long-term goal, and a general short-term goal that can be used to identify and track progress (e.g., incrementally increasing legibility, speed, or, fluency; improving test scores; or increasing length of workouts or practice sessions).

Review the "Personal Best" activity with the student during each counseling session to ensure the student's up-to-date completion of the chart and graph, affirm the student for the progress made, and encourage the student's continued effort toward the long-term goal. This activity can be used to track progress toward goal achievement in several skill areas if student motivation and circumstances warrant.

PERSONAL BEST

Choose an activity or academic subject that you would like to improve. Determine how you are going to measure your progress (e.g., grade, work sample, self-assessment, time on task, coach's rating). Before you begin to work, measure your performance on the subject or skill you have chosen to improve. This will be your baseline level of performance. If you are trying to improve your spelling scores, your baseline may be only two or three correct words on a quiz. If you are measuring your improvement in jumping rope, your baseline may be 5 or 10 jumps. As you study or practice, your skill will improve and you will achieve higher levels of performance. Each improved level that you measure is a personal best.

Record your improvement in scores, grades, or another method of assessment as you progress weekly or monthly throughout the year. Use the Personal Best Graph to record progress in one area of skill development. Shade in the graph and record the date of each personal best on the graph to measure both short- and long-term goal achievement.

Example

PERSONAL SKILL DEVELOPMENT

Date and Improved Grade Subject/Activity Unit of Measurement Baseline/Date or Score

Cursive writing Handwriting samples 9/1: Name only 10/1: Writing whole alphabet and 25 words

Letter to parents 12/1: 50 words Class assignments 3/1: 200 words 6/1: All assignments legible and in cursive

Short-Term Goal Long-Term Goal Percent of Progress Toward Goal

Increase speed and All assignments legible and 10/1: 10% legibility in cursive 12/1: 50% 3/1: 75% 6/1: 100%

PERSONAL BEST GRAPH

Tracking My Personal Progress

Shade or color in the graph and record the date as you progress toward your goal.

Continues...


Excerpted from School Counseling and School Social Work Homework Planner Excerpted by permission.
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Meet the Author

SARAH EDISON KNAPP, MSW, CSW, is an independent consultant, certified school social worker, parent, and educational trainer on issues of discipline and self-esteem.

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