School Discipline and Safety

Overview

Education of America’s school children always has been and always will be a hot-button issue. From what should be taught to how to pay for education to how to keep kids safe in schools, impassioned debates emerge and mushroom, both within the scholarly community and among the general public. This volume in the point/counterpoint Debating Issues in American Education reference series tackles the topic of school discipline and safety. Fifteen to twenty chapters explore such varied issues as child abuse reporting, ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (8) from $39.12   
  • New (6) from $84.27   
  • Used (2) from $35.30   
Sending request ...

Overview

Education of America’s school children always has been and always will be a hot-button issue. From what should be taught to how to pay for education to how to keep kids safe in schools, impassioned debates emerge and mushroom, both within the scholarly community and among the general public. This volume in the point/counterpoint Debating Issues in American Education reference series tackles the topic of school discipline and safety. Fifteen to twenty chapters explore such varied issues as child abuse reporting, corporal punishment, student uniforms, zero tolerance policies, and more. Each chapter opens with an introductory essay by the volume editor, followed by point/counterpoint articles written and signed by invited experts, and concludes with Further Readings and Resources, thus providing readers with views on multiple sides of school discipline and safety issues and pointing them toward more in-depth resources for further exploration.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Suzanne E. Eckes is an associate professor in the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Department at Indiana University. She has published more than 70 articles and book chapters on school law, is an editor of the Principal’s Legal Handbook, and is a member of the board of directors for the Education Law Association. She is the recipient of the Jack A. Culbertson Award for outstanding achievements in education from the University Council of Educational Administration. Prior to joining the faculty at Indiana University, Eckes was a high school French teacher and an attorney. She earned her master’s degree in education from Harvard University and her law degree and Ph D from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Charles J. Russo, JD, Ed D, is the Joseph Panzer Chair in Education in the School of Education and Allied Professions and adjunct professor in the School of Law at the University of Dayton. He was the 1998–1999 president of the Education Law Association and 2002 recipient of its Mc Ghehey (Achievement) Award. He has authored or coauthored more than 200 articles in peer-reviewed journals; has authored, coauthored, edited, or coedited 40 books; and has in excess of 800 publications. Russo also speaks extensively on issues in education law in the United States and abroad.

Along with having spoken in 33 states and 25 nations on 6 continents, Russo has taught summer courses in England, Spain, and Thailand; he also has served as a visiting professor at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane and the University of Newcastle, Australia; the University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina; South East European University, Macedonia; the Potchefstroom Campus of North-West University in Potchefstroom, South Africa; the University of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; and the University of São Paulo, Brazil. He regularly serves as a visiting professor at the Potchefstroom Campus of North-West University.

Before joining the faculty at the University of Dayton as professor and chair of the Department of Educational Administration in July 1996, Russo taught at the University of Kentucky in Lexington from August 1992 to July 1996 and at Fordham University in his native New York City from September 1989 to July 1992. He taught high school for 8½ years before and after graduation from law school. He received a BA (classical civilization) in 1972, a JD in 1983, and an Ed D (educational administration and supervision) in 1989 from St. John’s University in New York City. He also received a master of divinity degree from the Seminary of the Immaculate Conception in Huntington, New York, in 1978, as well as a Ph D Honoris Causa from the Potchefstroom Campus of North-West University, South Africa, in May 2004 for his contributions to the field of education law.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

About the Editors-in-Chief ix

About the Volume Editors xi

About the Contributors xii

Introduction xvii

1 Should All Public Schools Adopt Dress Code Policies That Focus on Student Safety? 1

Overview Suzanne E. Eckes 1

Point Richard Fossey 4

Counterpoint Todd A. DeMitchell 10

2 Are Zero Tolerance Policies Acceptable With Respect to Drugs, Alcohol, Weapons, Where Student Safety Is Concerned? 19

Overview Charles J. Russo 19

Point Aimee Vergon Gibbs 22

Counterpoint Charles B. Vergon 27

3 Should Zero Tolerance Policies Be Abolished Because Students of Color Are Overrepresented When Schools Adopt Such Policies? 36

Overview Charles J. Russo 36

Point Spencer C. Weiler 39

Counterpoint Luke M. Cornelius 46

4 Should Educators Be Liable for Failing to Stop Bullying in Classrooms? 55

Overview Suzanne E. Eckes 55

Point Mary C. Bradley 58

Counterpoint Jesulon S. R. Gibbs 64

5 Should Educators Have Legal Obligations With Respect to the Prevention of Student Suicide? 71

Overview Suzanne E. Eckes Sarah B. Burke 71

Point Nathan Burroughs 74

Counterpoint Richard Fossey 80

6 Must Teachers Report All Suspicions of Child Abuse and Neglect? 89

Overview Charles J. Russo 89

Point Susan C. Bon 92

Counterpoint Stephanie D. McCall 98

7 Should Corporal Punishment in Public Schools Be Abolished? 106

Overview Charles J. Russo 106

Point Aimee Vergon Gibbs 109

Counterpoint Emily Richardson 115

8 Should There Be a Distinction Between Academic Dishonesty and Student Conduct Violations? 123

Overview Ralph D. Mawdsley 123

Point Phillip Blackman 126

Counterpoint Peter L. Moran 132

9 Should Teachers Incorporate Extrinsic Motivators in Classroom Management Plans? 141

Overview Suzanne E. Eckes Stephen M. Harper 141

Point Robin L. Fankhauser 144

Counterpoint Erin B. Snell Charles R. Drew 149

10 Should School Resource Officers Function Strictly as Law Enforcement Officers? 157

Overview Suzanne E. Eckes Sarah B. Burke 157

Point M. David Alexander 160

Counterpoint Jennifer Sughrue 166

11 Are State and Federal Teacher Protection Acts Needed to Protect Teachers From Litigation Concerning Student Discipline? 177

Overview Suzanne E. Eckes 177

Point Amy Steketee 180

Counterpoint Janet R. Decker 185

12 In Loco Parentis: Should Teachers Take the Place of Parents in All School Disciplinary Matters? 194

Overview Charles J. Russo 194

Point Dana N. Thompson Dorsey 197

Counterpoint Allison A. Howland 202

13 Are Existing Controls Sufficient to Prevent the Overuse and Abuse of Seclusion and Physical Restraint in the Discipline of Students With Disabilities? 210

Overview Allan G. Osborne, Jr. 210

Point Allison S. Fetter-Harrott 214

Counterpoint Michelle Gough McKeown 221

14 Are Positive Behavioral Interventions Effective at Reducing Misbehavior in Students With Behavioral Disorders? 231

Overview Suzanne E. Eckes Sarah B. Burke 231

Point Theresa A. Ochoa 234

Counterpoint Diana Rogers-Adkinson 240

15 Should Teachers Have More Training in the Identification and Treatment of Maladaptive Internalizing Behaviors? 248

Overview Suzanne E. Eckes 248

Point Theresa A. Ochoa 251

Counterpoint Potheini Vaiouli 256

Index 265

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)