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The School Story

( 182 )

Overview

Two middle school girls scheme to publish a book in this novel from Andrew Clements, the author of Frindle.

Natalie's best friend, Zoe, is sure that the novel Natalie's written is good enough to be published. But how can a twelve-year-old girl publish a book? Natalie's mother is an editor for a big children's publisher, but Natalie doesn't want to ask for any favors.

Then Zoe has a brilliant idea: Natalie can submit her manuscript under a pen ...

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The School Story

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Overview

Two middle school girls scheme to publish a book in this novel from Andrew Clements, the author of Frindle.

Natalie's best friend, Zoe, is sure that the novel Natalie's written is good enough to be published. But how can a twelve-year-old girl publish a book? Natalie's mother is an editor for a big children's publisher, but Natalie doesn't want to ask for any favors.

Then Zoe has a brilliant idea: Natalie can submit her manuscript under a pen name, with Zoe acting as her literary agent. But it's not easy for two sixth graders to put themselves over as grown-ups, even with some help from a couple of real grown-ups who are supportive but skeptical. The next bestselling school story may be in their hands—but can Natalie and Zoe pull off their masquerade?

After twelve-year-old Natalie writes a wonderful novel, her friend Zoe helps her devise a scheme to get it accepted at the publishing house where Natalie's mother works as an editor.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Tales of determination and perseverance strike a chord with young readers, and they will become instantly engaged with 12-year-old Natalie, an enthusiastic writer who has penned a novel. It's a school story entitled The Cheater, and if Natalie's best friend, Zoë, and her English teacher, Ms. Clayton, can be believed, it's an exceptional tale. So it's a good thing that Natalie's mother works as an editor at a major New York City publishing house. Except for one thing -- Natalie wants the book to succeed on its own merits and not just because she's the editor's daughter.

Together, Natalie and Zoë cook up a scheme that involves submitting Natalie's book under a pseudonym, while Zoë pretends to be an agent. It seems far-fetched at first, but with a little help from their teacher and some last-minute assistance from Zoë's father, they not only submit the book and get it accepted -- after its release, it becomes a bestseller. But all is not rosy. Some unanticipated events place Natalie's mother's job in jeopardy, putting Zoë and Natalie's talent for scheming to a true test.

Award-winning and bestselling children's author Andrew Clements not only provides a pretty thorough education about what goes on in the publishing industry; he also offers a tale-within-a-tale by providing snippets from Natalie's book. The story and its characters are further brought to life through the finely detailed drawings of Brian Selznick. The School Story emphasizes aspirations and possibilities, while also providing a great lesson on recognizing and celebrating the differences, strengths, and weaknesses in all of us. As such, this delightful tale should ignite a creative spark in young minds, making it an excellent platform for launching classroom discussions and projects. (Beth Amos)

From The Critics
Twelve-year-old Natalie Nelson has written a novel set at a school. Her best friend, Zoe, loves it and is convinced it should be published. Although Natalie's mother is a children's-book editor, Natalie hesitates to show her the manuscript. Zoe convinces Natalie to submit the novel to her mother under a pen name. When Mrs. Nelson shows an interest in publishing the work, Zoe, posing on the phone as an agent, drives a hard bargain—but Natalie starts to worry about the consequences of deceiving her mother. <%END%>
Publishers Weekly
In a starred review, PW called this book about a 12-year-old aspiring author a "standout. Indeed a `school story,' this is at heart a tale about the love between a father and a daughter." Ages 8-12. (Sept.)
Children's Literature
Natalie is writing a book—a good book. The problem is, how does a twelve-year-old girl get a book publisher to take her seriously? Her friend Zoe comes to the rescue by becoming her imaginative and surprisingly competent literary agent. Careful and credible plotting makes this unlikely adventure almost believable. Aspiring young writers will be particularly interested, but should understand that today's demanding market isn't likely to find a twelve-year-old to be professional enough to publish. Nevertheless, readers will be dying to find out if Natalie succeeds, and will gain a lot of accurate and interesting information about slush piles and the publishing industry. Minus the credibility problem, this is an engaging story, though the beginning chapters lack some of the immediate vitality of Clements' earlier works. Black-and-white drawings lend additional interest to the already strong characters. Reviewer: Betty Hicks
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6 Actress Spencer Kayden does a wonderful job reading Andrew Clements' upbeat story (S&S, 2001) about Natalie, a sixth grader who has written an amazing short novel with a school setting, The Cheater. Natalie's dynamic and enterprising friend, Zoe, thinks that the novel should be published. Natalie's dad died unexpectedly, and what moves Zoe about the story are the passages about the love between a father and child. She convinces Natalie to pursue publication. Taking on the pseudonym of Cassandra Day, enlisting the help of her English teacher, and passing Zoe off as her bold agent, Natalie sends the manuscript to the publishing company where her mother works as an editor. Clements includes facts about the children's book industry as the amusing yet surprisingly poignant story unfolds. Kayden handles the touching scenes between Natalie and her mother quite well, but really shines as the exuberant Zoe. This pushy and excitable character almost steamrolls the novel with her comic antics, but Clements knows instinctively when to pull back and let Natalie's story prevail. Although things work out a bit too easily for Natalie, Clements' empathy for the characters makes The School Story work. Kayden's reading is energetic and fun, especially when she tackles the story's comedy and brings to life various New Yorker types. -Brian E. Wilson, Evanston Public Library, IL Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A world-class charmer, Clements (The Janitor's Boy) woos aspiring young authors—as well as grown up publishers, editors, agents, parents, teachers, and even reviewers—with this tongue-in-cheek tale of a 12-year-old novelist's triumphant debut. Sparked by a chance comment of her mother's, a harried assistant editor for a (surely fictional) children's imprint, Natalie draws on deep reserves of feeling and writing talent to create a moving story about a troubled schoolgirl and her father. First, it moves her pushy friend Zoe, who decides that it has to be published; then it moves a timorous, second-year English teacher into helping Zoe set up a virtual literary agency; then, submitted pseudonymously, it moves Natalie's unsuspecting mother into peddling it to her waspish editor-in-chief. Depicting the world of children's publishing as a delicious mix of idealism and office politics, Clements squires the manuscript past slush pile and contract, the editing process, and initial buzz ("The Cheater grabs hold of your heart and never lets go," gushes Kirkus). Finally, in a tearful, joyous scene—carefully staged by Zoe, who turns out to be perfect agent material: cunning, loyal, devious, manipulative, utterly shameless—at the publication party, Natalie's identity is revealed as news cameras roll. Selznick's gnomic, realistic portraits at once reflect the tale's droll undertone and deftly capture each character's distinct personality. Terrific for flourishing school writing projects, this is practical as well as poignant. Indeed, it "grabs hold of yourheart and never lets go." (Fiction. 10-12)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689851865
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 8/1/2002
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 76,874
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 760L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.12 (w) x 7.62 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew Clements is the author of the enormously popular Frindle. More than 10 million copies of his books have been sold, and he has been nominated for a multitude of state awards, including two Christopher Awards and an Edgar Award. His popular works include About Average, Troublemaker, Extra Credit, Lost and Found, No Talking, Room One, Lunch Money, and more. He is also the author of the Benjamin Pratt & the Keepers of the School series. He lives with his wife in Maine and has four grown children. Visit him at AndrewClements.com.

Brian Selznick is the author and illustrator of the bestselling The Invention of Hugo Cabret, which was awarded the Caldecott Medal and was a National Book Award finalist. He is also the illustrator of many books for children, including Frindle and Lunch Money by Andrew Clements, as well as the Doll People trilogy by Ann M. Martin and Laura Godwin, and The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins by Barbara Kerley, which was a Caldecott Honor Book. Mr. Selznick divides his time between Brooklyn, New York, and San Diego, California.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Fan Number One

Natalie couldn't take it. She peeked in the doorway of the school library, then turned, took six steps down the hall, turned, paced back, and stopped to look in at Zoe again. The suspense was torture.

Zoe was still reading. The first two chapters only added up to twelve pages. Natalie leaned against the door frame and chewed on her thumbnail. She thought, What's taking her so long?

Zoe could see Natalie out of the corner of her eye. She could feel all that nervous energy nudging at her, but Zoe wasn't about to be rushed. She always read slowly, and she liked it that way, especially when it was a good story. And this one was good.

The Cheater by Natalie Nelson

page 12

I catch up with Sean between Eighty-second and Eighty-first Streets. His legs are longer than mine, so I'm panting. I grab his arm and he stops in front of a bodega.

He says, "Why are you following me?"

"I've got to talk to you."

"Yeah, well, too bad. You had your chance to talk during the Penalty Board hearing. And you didn't."

"But if I told the truth, then the whole school would know I cheated. I'd get expelled."

He just looks at me. "But you really did cheat, right?...And I really didn't steal that answer key, right?...And you know I didn't steal it because you did, right?"

I nod yes to all the questions.

Sean is almost shouting now, his eyes wild. "So first you steal, then you cheat, and now you've lied. And me? You've left me to take the punishment."

The shopkeeper is worried. He moves from the counter to the doorway of the bodega, looking at us.

Sean ignores him and gets right into my face, screaming. "Well, guess what, Angela. We're not friends now — and I don't know if we ever were!"

He storms away, hands jammed in his pockets, shoulders hunched, stabbing the sidewalk with every step.

Me, I cry.

Zoe let page twelve slip onto the table and then stared at it, deep in thought.

"So, what do you think?"

Natalie was right behind her, and Zoe jumped six inches. "Jeez, Natalie! Scare me to death! And you ruined a nice moment too."

"But what do you think? Is it any good?"

Zoe nodded. "I think it's very good."

"Really?" Natalie pulled out a chair and sat down, leaning forward. "I mean, you're not just saying that because we're best friends?"

Zoe shook her head. "No, I mean it. It's good. Like I can't wait to read the whole thing. Can you bring the rest tomorrow?"

Natalie smiled and reached into her backpack. She pulled out a blue folder with a rubber band around it. "Here. I've still got to write about five more chapters. I just needed to know if the beginning was any good, but you can read what I've got done if you want."

Zoe took the folder carefully and said, "This is great. But you are going to finish it, right? Do you know the whole story already — like all the way to the end?"

Natalie said, "Not all the way to the end...but almost. I know how the end feels, but not exactly what happens — at least, not yet."

Natalie's book had begun by accident on the bus with her mom late one afternoon back in September. Sixth grade was already three weeks old, and both she and her mom had settled into the routine of commuting together. It was a Friday afternoon, and they were going home on the 5:55 coach, thundering through the Lincoln Tunnel from New York City to Hoboken, New Jersey.

Her mom looked exhausted. Natalie studied the face tilted toward her on the headrest. It was a pretty face — Prettier than mine, she thought. But there were little lines at the corners of her mother's eyes and mouth. Care lines, worry lines.

Natalie said, "Hard day, Mom?"

Eyes still closed, her mom smiled and nodded. "The editorial department met all day with the marketing department — all day."

Natalie asked, "How come?" When her dad died, Natalie had decided she needed to talk to her mom more. Sometimes she pretended to be interested in her mom's work at the publishing company even when she wasn't. Like now.

Her mom said, "Well, the marketing people keep track of what kinds of books kids and parents and teachers are buying. Then they tell us, and we're supposed to make more books like the ones they think people will buy."

Natalie said, "Makes sense. So, what kinds of books do they want you to make?"

Hannah Nelson lifted her head off the seat back and turned toward Natalie. "Here's the summary of a six-hour meeting. Ready?"

Natalie nodded.

Her mom used a deep voice that sounded bossy. "People, we need to publish more adventure books, more series books, and more school stories." In her regular voice she said, "That was it. A six-hour meeting for something that could have gone into a one-page memo — or a three-line E-mail."

Then Natalie asked, "What's a school story?"

"A school story is just what it sounds like — it's a short novel about kids and stuff that happens mostly at school."

Natalie thought for a second and then said, "You mean like Dear Mr. Henshaw?"

And her mom said, "Exactly."

Then Natalie said to herself, Hey, who knows more about school than someone who's right there, five days a week, nine months a year? I bet I could write a school story.

And that was all it took. Natalie Nelson the novelist was born.

Or almost born. Her career as an author didn't officially spring to life until about four months later — on that afternoon in the school library after Zoe read the first two chapters.

Because it's the same for every new author, for every new book. Somebody has to be the first to read it. Somebody has to be the first to say she likes it. Somebody has to be that first fan.

And of course, that was Zoe.

Text copyright © 2001 by Andrew Clements

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First Chapter

Chapter 1: Fan Number One

Natalie couldn't take it. She peeked in the doorway of the school library, then turned, took six steps down the hall, turned, paced back, and stopped to look in at Zoe again. The suspense was torture.

Zoe was still reading. The first two chapters only added up to twelve pages. Natalie leaned against the door frame and chewed on her thumbnail. She thought, What's taking her so long?

Zoe could see Natalie out of the corner of her eye. She could feel all that nervous energy nudging at her, but Zoe wasn't about to be rushed. She always read slowly, and she liked it that way, especially when it was a good story. And this one was good.


The Cheater by Natalie Nelson

page 12

I catch up with Sean between Eighty-second and Eighty-first Streets. His legs are longer than mine, so I'm panting. I grab his arm and he stops in front of a bodega.

He says, "Why are you following me?"

"I've got to talk to you."

"Yeah, well, too bad. You had your chance to talk during the Penalty Board hearing. And you didn't."

"But if I told the truth, then the whole school would know I cheated. I'd get expelled."

He just looks at me. "But you really did cheat, right?...And I really didn't steal that answer key, right?...And you know I didn't steal it because you did, right?"

I nod yes to all the questions.

Sean is almost shouting now, his eyes wild. "So first you steal, then you cheat, and now you've lied. And me? You've left me to take the punishment."

The shopkeeper is worried. He moves from the counter to the doorway of the bodega, looking at us.

Sean ignores him and gets right into my face, screaming. "Well, guess what, Angela. We're not friends now — and I don't know if we ever were!"

He storms away, hands jammed in his pockets, shoulders hunched, stabbing the sidewalk with every step.

Me, I cry.


Zoe let page twelve slip onto the table and then stared at it, deep in thought.

"So, what do you think?"

Natalie was right behind her, and Zoe jumped six inches. "Jeez, Natalie! Scare me to death! And you ruined a nice moment too."

"But what do you think? Is it any good?"

Zoe nodded. "I think it's very good."

"Really?" Natalie pulled out a chair and sat down, leaning forward. "I mean, you're not just saying that because we're best friends?"

Zoe shook her head. "No, I mean it. It's good. Like I can't wait to read the whole thing. Can you bring the rest tomorrow?"

Natalie smiled and reached into her backpack. She pulled out a blue folder with a rubber band around it. "Here. I've still got to write about five more chapters. I just needed to know if the beginning was any good, but you can read what I've got done if you want."

Zoe took the folder carefully and said, "This is great. But you are going to finish it, right? Do you know the whole story already — like all the way to the end?"

Natalie said, "Not all the way to the end...but almost. I know how the end feels, but not exactly what happens — at least, not yet."


Natalie's book had begun by accident on the bus with her mom late one afternoon back in September. Sixth grade was already three weeks old, and both she and her mom had settled into the routine of commuting together. It was a Friday afternoon, and they were going home on the 5:55 coach, thundering through the Lincoln Tunnel from New York City to Hoboken, New Jersey.

Her mom looked exhausted. Natalie studied the face tilted toward her on the headrest. It was a pretty face — Prettier than mine, she thought. But there were little lines at the corners of her mother's eyes and mouth. Care lines, worry lines.

Natalie said, "Hard day, Mom?"

Eyes still closed, her mom smiled and nodded. "The editorial department met all day with the marketing department — all day."

Natalie asked, "How come?" When her dad died, Natalie had decided she needed to talk to her mom more. Sometimes she pretended to be interested in her mom's work at the publishing company even when she wasn't. Like now.

Her mom said, "Well, the marketing people keep track of what kinds of books kids and parents and teachers are buying. Then they tell us, and we're supposed to make more books like the ones they think people will buy."

Natalie said, "Makes sense. So, what kinds of books do they want you to make?"

Hannah Nelson lifted her head off the seat back and turned toward Natalie. "Here's the summary of a six-hour meeting. Ready?"

Natalie nodded.

Her mom used a deep voice that sounded bossy. "People, we need to publish more adventure books, more series books, and more school stories." In her regular voice she said, "That was it. A six-hour meeting for something that could have gone into a one-page memo — or a three-line E-mail."

Then Natalie asked, "What's a school story?"

"A school story is just what it sounds like — it's a short novel about kids and stuff that happens mostly at school."

Natalie thought for a second and then said, "You mean like Dear Mr. Henshaw?"

And her mom said, "Exactly."

Then Natalie said to herself, Hey, who knows more about school than someone who's right there, five days a week, nine months a year? I bet I could write a school story.

And that was all it took. Natalie Nelson the novelist was born.

Or almost born. Her career as an author didn't officially spring to life until about four months later — on that afternoon in the school library after Zoe read the first two chapters.

Because it's the same for every new author, for every new book. Somebody has to be the first to read it. Somebody has to be the first to say she likes it. Somebody has to be that first fan.

And of course, that was Zoe.

Text copyright © 2001 by Andrew Clements

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Introduction

Discussion Topics

The School Story is a novel about the power of friendships, specifically the one between best friends Natalie Nelson and Zoe Reisman. But other friendships (obvious and not so obvious) are also explored in this story. Identify the different friendships included in the story and discuss them. What is your definition of a "friend"? Is it possible to have friendships with your parents, your relatives, your coworkers, and your teachers?

Natalie and Zoe have a "push and pull friendship." What does this mean? Do you think Natalie and Zoe's friendship is stronger because they are so different from each other? Which girl would you most likely become friends with: Natalie or Zoe? Why?

The topics of cheating and fairness are explored throughout this book. Natalie is initially dubious about adopting a pseudonym to submit "The Cheater" to Shipley Junior Books; she feels like she's cheating by doing so. Do you agree? Do you think it's fair that Natalie is able to use her contacts to get immediate attention for her book while numerous other manuscripts linger on the "slush pile" for months? Would you do the same if you were in her position?

Ms. Clayton is initially wary about getting involved with Natalie and Zoe's plan, but she decides to forge ahead anyway. Do you ever doubt that this is a good decision on Ms. Clayton's part? How does helping the girls with their project help Ms. Clayton in the end?

Why do you think Zoe works so hard to get Natalie's book published? Do you think the book would have been published without Zoe's resourcefulness and determination?

Sometimes taking risks in life is necessary in order to grow as a human being.Other than Natalie and Zoe, identify the characters who take risks in The School Story. Why do they take these risks, and what is the outcome? How do these risks contribute to their self-discovery?

The father/daughter bond is a prevalent theme in The School Story. Natalie writes "The Cheater" to feel closer to her late father. But how does she in reality become closer to her mother by writing the novel? How does Natalie's relationship with her mother change over the course of the book? What other father/daughter bonds are explored?

Andrew Clements writes in The School Story that "some people are talkers, and some people are writers." Which are you, and why?

Activities and Research

Research the children's publishing industry. Read back issues of Publishers Weekly online (www.publishersweekly.com) or at the library. Log on to the Internet to do additional research about the various children's publishers. The Children's Book Council Web site (www.cbcbooks.org) is a good place to start. How many children's publishers exist? What are the editorial guidelines for each company? Discuss what you learn from your research.

Find out about authors who currently write under pseudonyms. Can you discover why they adopt pen names and do not use their real names? If you assumed a pseudonym, what would it be, and why?

Based on the information provided in The School Story, make a chart that shows the different jobs people do in a publishing house. Did you realize that there were so many people involved with the creation of a single book? Which job discussed in The School Story intrigues you most?

Invite a local children's book author or illustrator to come to your school to talk about his or her experiences writing books for children. Attend a book signing by an author or illustrator at a local bookstore.

Andrew Clements is the author of the enormously popular FRINDLE. He has been nominated for a multitude of state awards and has won the Christopher Award and an Edgar Award. His popular works include EXTRA CREDIT, LOST AND FOUND, NO TALKING, ROOM ONE, LUNCH MONEY, A WEEK IN THE WOODS, THE JACKET, THE SCHOOL STORY, THE JANITOR'S BOY, THE LANDRY NEWS, THE REPORT CARD AND THE LAST HOLIDAY CONCERT. Mr. Clements taught in the public schools near Chicago for seven years before moving East to begin a career in publishing and writing. He lives with his wife in central Massachusetts and has four grown children.  His website is andrewclements.com. 

Brian Selznick is the author and illustrator of the bestselling The Invention of Hugo Cabret, which was awarded the Caldecott Medal and was a National Book Award finalist. He is also the illustrator of many books for children, including Frindle and Lunch Money by Andrew Clements, as well as the Doll People trilogy by Ann M. Martin and Laura Godwin, and The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins by Barbara Kerley, which was a Caldecott Honor Book. Mr. Selznick divides his time between Brooklyn, New York, and San Diego, California.

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Reading Group Guide

Discussion Topics

The School Story is a novel about the power of friendships, specifically the one between best friends Natalie Nelson and Zoe Reisman. But other friendships (obvious and not so obvious) are also explored in this story. Identify the different friendships included in the story and discuss them. What is your definition of a "friend"? Is it possible to have friendships with your parents, your relatives, your coworkers, and your teachers?

Natalie and Zoe have a "push and pull friendship." What does this mean? Do you think Natalie and Zoe's friendship is stronger because they are so different from each other? Which girl would you most likely become friends with: Natalie or Zoe? Why?

The topics of cheating and fairness are explored throughout this book. Natalie is initially dubious about adopting a pseudonym to submit "The Cheater" to Shipley Junior Books; she feels like she's cheating by doing so. Do you agree? Do you think it's fair that Natalie is able to use her contacts to get immediate attention for her book while numerous other manuscripts linger on the "slush pile" for months? Would you do the same if you were in her position?

Ms. Clayton is initially wary about getting involved with Natalie and Zoe's plan, but she decides to forge ahead anyway. Do you ever doubt that this is a good decision on Ms. Clayton's part? How does helping the girls with their project help Ms. Clayton in the end?

Why do you think Zoe works so hard to get Natalie's book published? Do you think the book would have been published without Zoe's resourcefulness and determination?

Sometimes taking risks in life is necessary in order to grow as a human being. Other than Natalie and Zoe, identify the characters who take risks in The School Story. Why do they take these risks, and what is the outcome? How do these risks contribute to their self-discovery?

The father/daughter bond is a prevalent theme in The School Story. Natalie writes "The Cheater" to feel closer to her late father. But how does she in reality become closer to her mother by writing the novel? How does Natalie's relationship with her mother change over the course of the book? What other father/daughter bonds are explored?

Andrew Clements writes in The School Story that "some people are talkers, and some people are writers." Which are you, and why?

Activities and Research

Research the children's publishing industry. Read back issues of Publishers Weekly online (www.publishersweekly.com) or at the library. Log on to the Internet to do additional research about the various children's publishers. The Children's Book Council Web site (www.cbcbooks.org) is a good place to start. How many children's publishers exist? What are the editorial guidelines for each company? Discuss what you learn from your research.

Find out about authors who currently write under pseudonyms. Can you discover why they adopt pen names and do not use their real names? If you assumed a pseudonym, what would it be, and why?

Based on the information provided in The School Story, make a chart that shows the different jobs people do in a publishing house. Did you realize that there were so many people involved with the creation of a single book? Which job discussed in The School Story intrigues you most?

Invite a local children's book author or illustrator to come to your school to talk about his or her experiences writing books for children. Attend a book signing by an author or illustrator at a local bookstore.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 182 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(128)

4 Star

(26)

3 Star

(13)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(10)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 183 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2012

    Outstanding!

    This book is wonderful! Great for writers of all ages. It may not happen to everyone (obviously) but was still a great read. I am above the reading level but still think it is awesome. Hard to put down once you start!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2012

    Inspiring

    It inspired me to write my own book!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2011

    Highly Recommended- Great!

    This book is great for young authors. It really shows that No matter how young you are you can do anything!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2009

    Exciting!!! Excelent, page turning, School Story!

    After the story I wished it was longer because it was so good. I expected the book to be a little different, but it was still awesome. I thought it was going to be good and turned out to be really good.

    Natalie is only 12 years old and has just written a book called "The Cheater". The thing is how is she going to get it published? Natalie needed an agent so she got her friend involved named Zoe. It turned out Zoe became her agent. Natalie's mom publishes books, she wanted her mom to publish her book. To get her mom to even look at the book she had to make up an author name like Doctor Sues and so did her agent because they were so young. They go through all these obstacles to try to get the book published. The question is will Natalie get her book published?

    I love this book because I love books about school and it has great characters. I also think that all people in grades 4-7 should read this marvelous book.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2012

    School story is AMAZIMG

    The book is so heartwarming and a great childrens book.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2012

    THRILLING

    I must have reread this book at least a dozen times because I love it SO much!!! Andrew Clements really gives the reader a bond with the main character (Natalie) and with the other characters. We feel Natalie's pain about her dad's death, and we realize that she has written her book about a daughter and a dad. And we want Natalie's book published just as much as she does. READ THIS BOOK!!! IT'S AMAZING!!!!!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2011

    Also

    I HATE PEOPLE WHO JUST SAY HI ON THE REVIEWS
    SO PLEASE DONT
    and another good book by the same athor is frindle its so good
    :)

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2013

    BEST BOOK EVER!

    So good! Totally reccomend this book!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2013

    Avery

    This book is so good me and my friend mallory are doing a book club for this book it is amazing READ IT

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2013

    OUTSTANDING

    OUTSTANDING BOOK I LOVE IT THU ^,^

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    Love andrew clemets

    I read this at school and loved it thrn i got it on my nook and read iso manu times i dont remember.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    This book is awesome!!!!!

    I love this book!!!!!!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2013

    I love this

    I love this book its really great!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2012

    Book, The School Story by Andrew Clements

    I really like it i am 9 and it is a good book for people my age .
    It is a book about two girls wanting to make a book. This is my favorite book by andrew clements Read It!!!!!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2012

    Interesting Book!

    This is a great book, particularly for ages 7-10, but it's still a great read if you're older!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2012

    Amazing

    Mr clement rocked this book

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 24, 2011

    Luv this book!!!

    I loved this book because at the end of the book it made me want to write a book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2007

    Insperational!

    This book is inspiring! the details is pheonomenal! The work that natalie put into this was off the hook!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2013

    Real book.

    Read this book in the real book. I loved it!! Keep the hard work up! ~ Tristen ~ BTW Im a girl.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2013

    Question!

    I just started reading it, and want to know; is it good enough to keep going?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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