Schooled to Order: A Social History of Public Schooling in the United States / Edition 1

Schooled to Order: A Social History of Public Schooling in the United States / Edition 1

by David Nasaw
     
 

'This is history of education in its finest tradition, i.e., education s social history rather than as mere schooling... Carefully researched, well written, and even-handed, Nasaw's book is an important addition to the debate over the evolution of public education in the United States.'See more details below

Overview

'This is history of education in its finest tradition, i.e., education s social history rather than as mere schooling... Carefully researched, well written, and even-handed, Nasaw's book is an important addition to the debate over the evolution of public education in the United States.'

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195028928
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
04/19/1979
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 5.31(h) x 0.74(d)
Lexile:
1500L (what's this?)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Introduction3
IThe Common Schools 1835-1855
1The New World and the Old7
The children7
The spread of indiscipline16
Charity schools18
2The Ultimate Reform: The Common Schools29
The reformers30
The problem with the (unreformed) schools33
A "common" republicanism; a "common" Protestantism39
3The Campaign for the Common Schools: The Enthusiasts, the Indifferent, and the Opposition44
The manufacturers and the common schools44
The workers, their organizations, and the common schools48
The campaign for school taxes: the reformers vs. the districts50
Who shall teach the children?60
4The Irish and the Common Schools66
The Irish: making a living, building a community66
Schools for Irish children69
The reformers' response72
5The Legacy of Reform--the Ideology and the Institution80
IIThe High Schools 1895-1915
6The "Youth" Problem87
The invention of "adolescence": G. Stanley Hall87
The "bad boys": who were they?89
The adolescent and the law93
Child-saving96
The "youth" problem as a "class" problem98
7The War Against the Wards105
The call to battle106
Business leads the charge107
8Reforming the High Schools114
"Youth" problems, "class" problems, and some early attempts to solve them115
High schools and white collars117
The high schools: a new weapon in the battle for exports and against the unions120
Industrial schooling: for whom?124
9New Studies for New Students126
Industrial schooling for the "plain people"127
Differentiation: the new democracy in secondary schooling129
The new students: what they wanted, what they got134
Social efficiency in secondary schooling139
10Reaction, Resistance, and the Final Compromise146
The union response146
The "plain people's" response147
The educators' response150
Secondary schooling: for industrial efficiency or for democracy?154
The final compromise: the comprehensive high school156
IIIHigher Education 1945-1970
11Between the World Wars: To School or to Work?161
High School: for whom?161
College: for whom?164
12One Depression Cured, Another Prevented: Planning for War and Postwar170
Fighting the war the American way171
The G.1. Bill173
13In the "National Interest": The Private Universities in Postwar183
From World War to Cold War: the state and the corporation184
The R&D explosion186
Of research and education189
New funds and functions192
14A "Rising Tide" of Students: the Public Sector197
Fewer "good" jobs and more job hunters198
Postwar plans and planners: new goals for higher education203
The "tidal wave" approaches205
Of plans and planners210
15The "Tidal Wave" Contained--Open Admissions214
Open admissions: for whom?215
Open admissions: to where? and why?221
The higher education pyramid230
Conclusion239
Notes245
Bibliography275
Index295

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