Schoolgirl

Schoolgirl

4.0 1
by Osamu Dazai
     
 

The novella that first propelled Dazai into the literary elite of post-war Japan. Essentially the start of Dazai's career, Schoolgirl gained notoriety for its ironic and inventive use of language. Now it illuminates the prevalent social structures of a lost time, as well as the struggle of the individual against them--a theme that occupied Dazai's life both personally…  See more details below

Overview

The novella that first propelled Dazai into the literary elite of post-war Japan. Essentially the start of Dazai's career, Schoolgirl gained notoriety for its ironic and inventive use of language. Now it illuminates the prevalent social structures of a lost time, as well as the struggle of the individual against them--a theme that occupied Dazai's life both personally and professionally. This new translation preserves the playful language of the original and offers the reader a new window into the mind of one of the greatest Japanese authors of the 20th century.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781937563622
Publisher:
SCB Distributors
Publication date:
03/01/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,052,042
File size:
270 KB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Osamu Dazai (1909-1948) is widely regarded as not only one of the most important figures in post-war Japanese literature, but as one of the most highly regarded Japanese author's of modern Japan. He was widely known by contemporaries for his eclectic lifestyle, inventive use of language, and his multiple suicide attempts, which led to his final, successful attempt in 1948. His two major novels, No Longer Human and The Setting Sun, continue to enjoy great sales in Japan, where they are often required reading for high school students.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Schoolgirl 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com More than 1 year ago
School­girl (Joseito) by Osamu Dazai is a short fic­tional story which started the authors career. The 1933 book is being reis­sued in a new translation. A day in the life of a teenage girl, on the verge of becom­ing a woman. She is deal­ing with a depressed mom, cop­ing with the recent death of her dad, school and the other prob­lems girls like her deal on a daily base. While her inner tur­moil is boil­ing, she keeps a cool façade when it comes to por­tray­ing what she feels. Some­times hyp­o­crit­i­cal, some­times sad but interesting. School­girl by Osamu Dazai, a Japan­ese nov­el­ist and a mas­ter sto­ry­teller, is a play­ful book which is seem­ingly sim­ple but is more than it seems on the sur­face. At first start­ing to read the book I thought "what the hell is this?" but as I read fur­ther along I real­ized that the book is much deeper than the banal mus­ings of a teenage girl. The nar­ra­tor con­tra­dicts her­self left and right and by doing so turns her­self inside out for the ben­e­fit of the reader. The reader is privy to the inter­nal tur­moil which boils under­neath her skin and the demeanor which she dis­plays to the out­side world. Stream-of-consciousness books can go either way for me. Some of them are annoy­ing or seem more like a long tirade, how­ever done right, as it is in this instance they can be brilliant. This girl, stuck at an age where she is no longer a girl, but not yet a woman is an inter­est­ing age for authors, and hell­ish for young adults and their par­ents. There are many books, espe­cially since the mid-twentieth cen­tury (Catcher in the Rye, Clock­work Orange, etc.) which touch this sub­ject. This book is not in the scope of oth­ers, as the story is more con­cep­tual but some­how it works. While I did enjoy this book, I wish I would have read some of Mr. Dazai's other works before­hand. It is a good story, an excel­lent exer­cise in writ­ing, but I don't know if I would have fin­ished it if it would have been longer.