Schoolmaster To An Empire

Overview

Brunton's memoir opens a window on life and times in Meiji Japan from 1868 to 1876, a crucial period in that country's transformation from a medieval backwater into an efficient modern society. Schoolmaster to an Empire, the premier volume in Greenwood's newly initiated Asian Studies Series, provides a rare first-hand account of a nineteenth century English engineer and his key role in the epic-making technical developments of the time. Hired by the Japanese at the age of 27 as engineer in charge of a lighthouse ...

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Overview

Brunton's memoir opens a window on life and times in Meiji Japan from 1868 to 1876, a crucial period in that country's transformation from a medieval backwater into an efficient modern society. Schoolmaster to an Empire, the premier volume in Greenwood's newly initiated Asian Studies Series, provides a rare first-hand account of a nineteenth century English engineer and his key role in the epic-making technical developments of the time. Hired by the Japanese at the age of 27 as engineer in charge of a lighthouse project that would light the coast of Japan, Brunton embarked on a series of varied and adventurous experiences whose record is an enlightening case study of one yatoi, or hired foreign servant, in Japan. Because of the archaic technical level of old world Japan, Brunton the lighthouse builder was also compelled to design, build, and launch ships; build bridges and railways; drain swamps; and pave, drain, and light new settlements. His pages describing his inventive solutions to each new challenge make absorbing and sometimes amusing reading. Brunton's major contribution was probably the training of Japan's first modern mechanics and his insistence on the necessity of scientific training and preparation in a country where technical labor was despised and the skilled trades barely existed. Brunton emerges as a singular teacher not only of technological skills but also of the attitudes and mind set necessary to accomplish ambitious new tasks.

This manuscript has been in the making for the last ninety years, according to editor/annotator Edward R. Beauchamp. Brunton completed his memoir shortly before his death in 1901, and it subsequently received the editorial attentions of three separate editors who were unsuccessful in publishing it. Beauchamp's conscientious efforts have restored the important but over-edited work as nearly as possible to Brunton's original language. The editor has retained and updated previous editors' useful annotations and incorporated additional notes to reflect new information and recently published materials bearing on the topics covered by Brunton. This final version is faithful both to Brunton's intent and the stylistic vagaries of the nineteenth century, while also containing updated materials. The 36-chapter volume is packed with fascinating details of the period, and it touches on subjects ranging from Building Iron Bridges and Women's Education in Japan to The Jealous Japanese. Here is an astounding portrait of Japan, the manufacturing giant, in its infancy. Schoolmaster to an Empire will appeal to general and specialist readers. It can also be used as a supplementary text in courses dealing with nineteenth century Japan and cross-cultural topics. Libraries, especially those with Asian interests, will find this a necessary addition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780313277955
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/17/1991
  • Series: Contributions in Asian Studies Series
  • Pages: 200
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

EDWARD R. BEAUCHAMP is Professor of Historical and Comparative Education at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

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Table of Contents

Introduction

My Appointment to Japan

The First Telegraph in Japan

Laying Out a New Settlement

Water and Light

Building Iron Bridges

Osaka: An Interned City

Taming the Shinano River

The Gold Mines of Sado

The Pioneer Railway in the Far East

Maps, Surveys, and Engineering Education

The New Coinage

The Great Fire in Tokio

The Craze for Steamers

Location of the Lighthouses

In the Historic Port of Nagasaki

Buying a Lighthouse Tender

My Visit to Satsuma

The American Warship Oneida

The Purchase of the Thabor

The Jealous Japanese

The Dockyard at Yokosuka

The Expedition to Formosa

Vicissitudes

Necessity, the Mother of Invention

Building Lightships

Audience of the Emperor

The Great Embassy to the Treaty Powers

Home Again--With the Japanese in England

Japanese Petroleum

Women's Education in Japan

The Japanese in Bad Temper

The Yokohama Harbor Scheme

Maintaining Discipline

Keeping Up the Standards

The Riu Kiu [Ryukyu] Islands

Personal Judgements

Index

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