Science and Human Origins by Ann Gauger | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Science and Human Origins

Science and Human Origins

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by Ann Gauger
     
 

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Is the evidence for a purely Darwinian account of human origins overwhelming? In this provocative book, three scientists challenge the claim that undirected natural selection is capable of building a human being, critically assess fossil and genetic evidence that human beings share a common ancestor with apes, and debunk claims that the human race could not have

Overview

Is the evidence for a purely Darwinian account of human origins overwhelming? In this provocative book, three scientists challenge the claim that undirected natural selection is capable of building a human being, critically assess fossil and genetic evidence that human beings share a common ancestor with apes, and debunk claims that the human race could not have started from an original couple.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940045571890
Publisher:
Discovery Institute
Publication date:
12/17/2013
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
631,222
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Ann Gauger is a senior research scientist at Biologic Institute. Her work uses molecular genetics and genomic engineering to study the origin, organization and operation of metabolic pathways. She received a BS in biology from MIT, and a PhD in developmental biology from the University of Washington, where she studied cell adhesion molecules involved in Drosophila embryogenesis. As a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard she cloned and characterized the Drosophila kinesin light chain. Her research has been published in Nature, Development, and the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

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Science and Human Origins 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This very short book by three scientists critically examines whether neo-Darwinian evolution is sufficient to account for the development of human beings. Whatever your view of evolution, this is a helpful book. If you are convinced by modern Darwinian theory, this book will stimulate and challenge your thinking. If you are skeptical of Darwinian theory, this book will provide a lot of food for thought. The five brief chapters look at experimental research on proteins and what they mean for human origins, the fossil record, genetic similarities between humans and chimps, and population genetics as applied to humans. The many footnotes to primary sources encourages further exploration of the topics discussed. A great introduction to the debates over human origins.