Science and the Open Society: In Defense of Reason and the Freedom of Thought

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"It is the best introduction to Popper's work that I have ever read... given the recent deaths of Popper, Gellner and Feyerabend, the time is ripe for a text that shows the future relevance of the Popperian legacy. It's hard to imagine a better book than Notturno's in that respect." Professor Steve Fuller, University of Warwick

Science and the Open Society is a clearly argued and easy to read defense of Karl Popper's philosophy by Dr. Mark Notturno, the man whom Popper chose to research and edit his archives. ...
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New York, N. y 2000 First Edition. Wraps. Very good indeed. 8vo. Colour illustrated wraps/paperback. ISBN: 963911670X Pages: 314. *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from ... an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

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Overview

"It is the best introduction to Popper's work that I have ever read... given the recent deaths of Popper, Gellner and Feyerabend, the time is ripe for a text that shows the future relevance of the Popperian legacy. It's hard to imagine a better book than Notturno's in that respect." Professor Steve Fuller, University of Warwick

Science and the Open Society is a clearly argued and easy to read defense of Karl Popper's philosophy by Dr. Mark Notturno, the man whom Popper chose to research and edit his archives. The author argues that Popper's ideas about science and open society are still largely misunderstood in the west, but are now more important than ever in providing inspiration for the people in Central and Eastern Europe and Middle Asia who are struggling to open up their closed societies.

This groundbreaking volume draws together themes from Popper's epistemology and social philosophy - showing, for example, the connections between his distrust of communism and inductivism, his resistance to institutionalized science and logical positivism, and his opposition to intellectual authority and bureaucracy. Notturno discusses Popper's disagreements with Wittgenstein, Freud, Carnap, Gruenbaum and Kuhn, while developing the implications of his view for a wide range of contemporary issues, including politics, education, logic, critical thinking and the history of 20th century philosophy.

Science and the Open Society is written for the general reader in a style that will appeal to philosophers and non-philosophers alike.

Contents
Part 1: The open society and its enemies Part 2: Tolerance, freedom and truth Part 3: Education for an open societyPart 4: Science and the institution Part 5: Induction and demarcation Part 6: Inference and deference Part 7: The meaning of World 3, or why Wittgenstein walked out Part 8: Popper's critique of scientific socialism, or Carnap and his co-workers Part 9: Is Freudian psychoanalytic theory really falsifiable? Part 10: The choice between Popper and Kuhn Epilogue: Index

2000
287 pages
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What People Are Saying

Steve Fuller
It is the best introduction to Popper's work that I have ever read... given the recent deaths of Popper, Gellner and Feyerabend, the time is ripe for a text that shows the future relevance of the Popperian legacy. It's hard to imagine a better book than Notturno's in that respect.
—Professor Steve Fuller, University of Warwick
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9789639116702
  • Publisher: Central European University Press
  • Publication date: 2/1/1900
  • Pages: 482
  • Product dimensions: 6.11 (w) x 9.01 (h) x 1.07 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction
1 The Open Society and Its Enemies: Authority, Community, and Bureaucracy 1
2 Tolerance, Freedom, and Truth: Fallibilism and the Opening of Closed Societies 25
3 Education for an Open Society 47
4 Science and 'The Institution' 73
5 Induction and Demarcation 97
6 Inference and Deference: Authority and the Goals of Critical Thinking 123
7 The Meaning of World 3, or Why Wittgenstein Walked Out 139
8 Popper's Critique of Scientific Socialism, or Carnap and His Co-workers 163
9 Is Freudian Psychoanalytic Theory Really Falsifiable? (and other political questions) 195
10 The Choice between Popper and Kuhn: Truth, Criticism, and The Legacy of Logical Positivism 225
Epilogue: What Is To Be Done? or Social(ist) Science, and the Emergence of Post-Communist Communism 255
Subject Index 269
Name Index 285
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2001

    Blows Your Mind

    Wow! Easily one of the best reads I've had in years. Not only is it an insightful source of understanding for those interested in Karl Popper's philosophy, but Notturno, himself, emerges as a powerful player in the field of critical reasoning and the politics of knowledge. A devastatingly effective thinker and writer in his own right. It will change your view of the world and the role of reasoning and politics in the conduct of human affairs. Awesome!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2001

    The Enduring Legacy of Karl Popper: A Review of 'Science and the Open Society'

    Karl Popper had one of the broadest ranges of any 20th Century philosopher. He wrote in Epistemology, Philosophy and History of Science, Logic, and Democratic Theory. In each area he wrote trenchantly and with great excellence and imagination. He was the greatest of 20th century philosophers. Why I feel this way can begin to be understood by reading Mark A. Notturno's 'Science and the Open Society.' Notturno's work is the most valuable gateway to Popper's yet. It is one of those very few books that serve as the core of one's library, that one returns to again and again. All of the Chapters in 'Science and the Open Society' are striking and contain worthwhile insights. As a whole they allow one to think about the corpus of Popper's work and the major themes he developed over the course of 60 years. In fact, Popper himself wrote no single work that would allow us to do that. Notturno, in providing that perspective here, gives us a bird's eye view that we must work much harder to get from Popper's work. If you seek an understanding of Popper, start with Notturno and then read Popper for yourself, with the context you need to actively grasp what Popper presents. All of the book is valuable, but there are a few Chapters that stand out from my own perspective as a Knowledge Management practitioner. These are Chapter 10 on the choice between Popper and Kuhn, Chapter 7 on the meaning of world 3, Chapter 5, a brilliant account of the breakdown of foundationalism and justificationism and of how Popper's critical rationalism escapes from the problems inherent in these views and provides a basis for solving the problems of induction and demarcation, and Chapter 3 on the significance of critical rationalism for education in open societies. Here is a more detailed review of Chapters 10 and 7. Chapter 10, 'The Choice Between Popper and Kuhn: Truth, Criticism, and the Legacy of Logical Positivism,' takes up again the task of proper reconstruction of the nature of science following the breakdown of logical positivism. Notturno shows that Popper and Kuhn took two contrasting roads in journeying from this crossroads of 20th century philosophy. He traces how Kuhn and the many who followed him took the road to relativism, institutionalism, and 'political' science, while denying the possibility of external rational critques of governing paradigms. Popper, on the other hand, took the road to thoroughgoing fallibilistic truth-seeking, a path which rejected foundationalism and justificationism, and offered a view of scientific objectivity attained through shared criticism of alternative knowledge claims conjectured as solutions to problems. As Notturno puts it (P. 230): 'The issue at base is whether science should be an open or a closed society.' Notturno shows that its is Kuhn's choice that leads to the closed society, and Popper's that supports the idea that (P. 248) '. . . our scientific institutions should exist for the sake of the individual - for the sake of our freedom of thought and our right to express it - and not the other way around.' Chapter 7 is a careful account of Popper's controversial notion that there are at least three 'worlds' or realms of ontological significance: (1) the material world of tables, atoms, buildings, lamps, etc., (2) the mental world of thoughts, beliefs, emotions, etc. and (3) the 'world' of words and language, art, mathematics, music, and other human, non-material, but sharable and autonomous creations. Popper criticized monism, the doctrine that only the physical world exists, and dualism, the idea that there is only mind, matter, and the interaction between them, in favor of a broader interactionism among three realms. This idea has been among the most difficult of notions for people to accept. To many (including Feyerabend and Lakatos who ridiculed it), it smacks of Platonism, even though Popper clearly distinguished his own world 3 ideas from platonic forms. But Popper's world 3 notions

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