Science Serialized: Representations of the Sciences in Nineteenth-Century Periodicals

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Overview

Nineteenth-century Britain saw an explosion of periodical literature, with the publication of over 100,000 different magazines and newspapers for a growing market of eager readers. The Victorian periodical press became an important medium for the dissemination of scientific ideas. Every major scientific advance in the nineteenth century was trumpeted and analyzed in periodicals ranging from intellectual quarterlies such as the Edinburgh Review to popular weeklies like the Mirror of Literature, from religious periodicals such as the Evangelical
Magazine to the atheistic Oracle of Reason. Scientific articles appeared side by side with the latest fiction or political reporting, while articles on nonscientific topics and serialized novels invoked scientific theories or used analogies drawn from science.The essays collected in Science
Serialized examine the variety of ways in which the nineteenth-century periodical press represented science to both general and specialized readerships. They explore the role of scientific controversy in the press and the cultural politics of publication. Subject range from the presentation of botany in women's magazines to the highly public dispute between Darwin and Samuel Butler, and from discussions of the mind-body problem to those of energy physics. Contributors include leading scholars in the fields of history of science and literature: Ann B. Shteir, Jonathan Topham, Frank
A. J. L. James, Roger Smith, Graeme Gooday, Crosbie Smith, Ian Higginson, Gillian Beer, Bernard
Lightman, Helen Small, Gowan Dawson, Jonathan Smith, James G. Paradis, and Harriet Ritvo.

The MIT Press

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Geoffrey Cantor is Professor in the History of Science at the University of Leeds and author of, among other books, Michael Faraday, Sandemanian and Scientist.

Sally Shuttleworth is Professor of English Literature at the University of Sheffield and author of a number of books, including George Eliot and Nineteenth Century Science. They are codirectors of the SciPer (Science in the Nineteenth Century Periodical) project.

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Table of Contents

1 Introduction 1
2 "Let Us Examine the Flower": Botany in Women's Magazines, 1800-1830 17
3 Science, Natural Theology, and the Practice of Christian Piety in Early-Nineteenth-Century Religious Magazines 37
4 Reporting Royal Institution Lectures, 1826-1867 67
5 The Physiology of the Will: Mind, Body, and Psychology in the Periodical Literature, 1855-1875 81
6 Sunspots, Weather, and the Unseen Universe: Balfour Stewart's Anti-Materialist Representations of "Energy" in British Periodicals 111
7 "Improvised Europeans": Science and Reform in the North American Review, 1865-1880 149
8 The Academy: Europe in England 181
9 Scientists as Materialists in the Periodical Press: Tyndall's Belfast Address 199
10 Science, Liberalism, and the Ethics of Belief: The Contemporary Review in 1877 239
11 Victorian Periodicals and the Making of William Kingdom Clifford's Posthumous Reputation 259
12 Grant Allen, Physiological Aesthetics, and the Dissemination of Darwin's Botany 285
13 The Butler-Darwin Biographical Controversy in the Victorian Periodical Press 307
14 Understanding Audiences and Misunderstanding Audiences: Some Publics for Science 331
About the Authors 351
Index 355
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