Scientific Culture and the Making of the Industrial West

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Overview


As more historians acknowledge the central significance of science and technology in the making of the first Industrial Revolution, the need for a good, general history of the achievements of the Scientific Revolution has grown. Scientific Culture and The Making of the Industrial West explains this historical process by looking at how and why scientific knowledge became such an integral part of the culture of Europe. Seeking to understand the cultural origins of the Industrial Revolution of the eighteenth century, this text first looks at the scientific culture of the seventeenth century, focusing not only on England but following through with a study of the history of science and technology in France, the Netherlands, and Germany. Comparative in structure, this text explains why England was so much more successful at this transition than its continental counterparts. It also integrates science with worldly concerns, focusing mainly on the entrepreneurs and engineers who possessed scientific insight and who were eager to profit from its advantages, demonstrating that during the mid-seventeenth century, British science was presented within an ideological framework that encouraged material prosperity. Readable summaries of the major scientific achievements are included to better communicate the central innovations of the period, and recent scholarship is added to help enhance the discussion of the integration of science into Western culture. Blending the history of science and technology with cultural history, this text is ideal for early modern European history courses, as well as for courses in cultural studies and the history of science.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195082197
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 1/2/1997
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 9.50 (w) x 6.25 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

University of California, Los Angeles
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introduction 1
I Intellectual Foundations 13
1 The New Science and Its New Audience 15
2 The Cultural Meaning of Cartesianism: From the Self to Nature (and Back to the State) 34
3 Science in the Crucible of the English Revolution 51
4 The Newtonian Enlightenment 73
II Cultural and Social Foundations 97
5 The Cultural Origins of the First Industrial Revolution 99
6 The Watts, Entrepreneurs 116
7 Scientific Education and Industrialization in Continental Europe 131
8 French Industry and Engineers under Absolutism and Revolution 165
9 How Science Worked in Industrial Moments: Case Studies from Great Britain 187
Notes 208
Bibliography 255
Index 261
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