The Scientific Estate / Edition 1

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Overview

The faith in science as an ally of political and economic progress, which Franklin and Jefferson made so firm a part of the American tradition, has been undermined by the very success of the scientific revolution. Has science become so powerful that it cannot be controlled by democratic processes? Is the scientific community acquiring a privileged role in government something like that of the ecclesiastical estate in the medieval world?

Writing from first-hand experience in government administration and his service on three presidential advisory panels, as well as from extensive research, Mr. Price describes how science and technology have weakened the independence of private corporations and broken down some of the checks and balances on which we have relied for the protection of freedom. In this connection he recounts the recent attempts to set up a notional program of oceanographic research, showing that the more advanced the scientific and technological programs ore, the more difficult it is to contain them within the normal departmental structure and the more likely they ore to bypass the regular lines of responsibility. He then faces the question whether science is leading us toward some new type of centralized power in which its own processes, rather than those of representative democracy, will determine our policies.

He argues, on the contrary, that the more scientific the sciences become, and the more competent to help in the understanding of public issues, the more freedom of choice they provide for responsible politicians. Science can be translated into political decisions only if its knowledge can be mixed with political purpose. This is done through a chain of responsibility that runs from the scientists to the professionals (like engineers and physicians), and on to administrators and politicians.

Within this set of relations, Mr. Price suggests, we are developing a new system of checks and balances. For whether science leads toward tyranny or freedom depends not on a nation's state of technological progress, but on what it believes. The freedom of science owes less to the nineteenth-century ideas of laissez faire and parliamentary sovereignty than to the older tradition on which the American revolution based its separation of church and state and its federal system.

Mr. Price examines the ways in which the President and Congress make use of scientific advice. He sees less reason to fear that authority will be unduly centralized in either the legislative or executive branch, under the American system, than that executive agencies and Congressional committees with common interests in technological programs may acquire power and influence without adequate responsibility.

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Editorial Reviews

The Listener

The Scientific Estate is a book that is hard to praise highly enough; indeed I can think of no book in the general field of government that deserves to rank with it in all the copious literature of the last decade and more.
— Max Beloff

Public Administration Review

[To the understanding of] the broad subject of science and public policy, Don K. Price's book has made a major contribution. It may not be too soon to predict that The Scientific Estate will become a classic.
— Brewster C. Denny

The New York Times

Always stimulating and never dull, this perceptive book by a distinguished social scientist gives hope that the 'Two Cultures' of C.P. Snow can interact for mutual benefit and not collide with mutual harm. It may well be the most important book in this area written to date.
— Harry Schwartz

American Political Science Review

Don K. Price has written a superb statement of contemporary political philosophy...This book is filed with acute observation and some new, purely intellectual, insights that a reader will wish he had seen first. If books, rather than print-outs, are still read in future colleges, this one should stay on the list for political philosophy for a long time. It deals with fundamental questions of power and freedom and the uses of knowledge for human welfare.
— James L. McCamy

The Washington Post

This book represents a crucial bench mark. It will serve as a starting basis for future scholarship in an area important to all citizens.
— Philip H. Abelson

Commentary

Something of a triumph of subtlety and aspiration...This is a book about science that a humanist might be able to read; the only adequate word for it is 'sophisticated.'
— Eric Larrabee

The Listener - Max Beloff
The Scientific Estate is a book that is hard to praise highly enough; indeed I can think of no book in the general field of government that deserves to rank with it in all the copious literature of the last decade and more.
Public Administration Review - Brewster C. Denny
[To the understanding of] the broad subject of science and public policy, Don K. Price's book has made a major contribution. It may not be too soon to predict that The Scientific Estate will become a classic.
The New York Times - Harry Schwartz
Always stimulating and never dull, this perceptive book by a distinguished social scientist gives hope that the 'Two Cultures' of C.P. Snow can interact for mutual benefit and not collide with mutual harm. It may well be the most important book in this area written to date.
American Political Science Review - James L. McCamy
Don K. Price has written a superb statement of contemporary political philosophy...This book is filed with acute observation and some new, purely intellectual, insights that a reader will wish he had seen first. If books, rather than print-outs, are still read in future colleges, this one should stay on the list for political philosophy for a long time. It deals with fundamental questions of power and freedom and the uses of knowledge for human welfare.
The Washington Post - Philip H. Abelson
This book represents a crucial bench mark. It will serve as a starting basis for future scholarship in an area important to all citizens.
Commentary - Eric Larrabee
Something of a triumph of subtlety and aspiration...This is a book about science that a humanist might be able to read; the only adequate word for it is 'sophisticated.'
The New York Times
Always stimulating and never dull, this perceptive book by a distinguished social scientist gives hope that the 'Two Cultures' of C.P. Snow can interact for mutual benefit and not collide with mutual harm. It may well be the most important book in this area written to date.
— Harry Schwartz
The Washington Post
This book represents a crucial bench mark. It will serve as a starting basis for future scholarship in an area important to all citizens.
— Philip H. Abelson
Commentary
Something of a triumph of subtlety and aspiration...This is a book about science that a humanist might be able to read; the only adequate word for it is 'sophisticated.'
— Eric Larrabee
American Political Science Review
Don K. Price has written a superb statement of contemporary political philosophy...This book is filed with acute observation and some new, purely intellectual, insights that a reader will wish he had seen first. If books, rather than print-outs, are still read in future colleges, this one should stay on the list for political philosophy for a long time. It deals with fundamental questions of power and freedom and the uses of knowledge for human welfare.
— James L. McCamy
Public Administration Review
[To the understanding of] the broad subject of science and public policy, Don K. Price's book has made a major contribution. It may not be too soon to predict that The Scientific Estate will become a classic.
— Brewster C. Denny
The Listener
The Scientific Estate is a book that is hard to praise highly enough; indeed I can think of no book in the general field of government that deserves to rank with it in all the copious literature of the last decade and more.
— Max Beloff
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674794856
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 1/28/1965
  • Series: Belknap Press Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 5.82 (w) x 8.61 (h) x 1.02 (d)

Meet the Author

Mr. Price was Dean of the John Fitzgerald Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University and the 1967 President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Table of Contents

Escape to the Endless Frontier

The Fusion of Economic and Political Power

The Diffusion of Sovereignty

The Established Dissenters

The Spectrum from Truth to Power

Constitutional Relativity

Professionals and Politicians

Science and Freedom

Notes

Index

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