Scientific Papers

Overview

Translator names not noted above: Stephen Paget, Robert Willis, F. Faulkner, D.C. Robb, and H.C. Ernst.

Originally published between 1909 and 1917 under the name "Harvard Classics," this stupendous 51-volume set-a collection of the greatest writings from literature, philosophy, history, and mythology-was assembled by American academic CHARLES WILLIAM ELIOT (1834-1926), Harvard University's longest-serving president. Also known as "Dr. Eliot's Five Foot Shelf," it represented ...

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Overview

Translator names not noted above: Stephen Paget, Robert Willis, F. Faulkner, D.C. Robb, and H.C. Ernst.

Originally published between 1909 and 1917 under the name "Harvard Classics," this stupendous 51-volume set-a collection of the greatest writings from literature, philosophy, history, and mythology-was assembled by American academic CHARLES WILLIAM ELIOT (1834-1926), Harvard University's longest-serving president. Also known as "Dr. Eliot's Five Foot Shelf," it represented Eliot's belief that a basic liberal education could be gleaned by reading from an anthology of works that could fit on five feet of bookshelf.

Volume XXXVIII includes important foundational works of science and medicine:

• "The Oath" of Hippocrates, dating from the 4th century BC
• "Journeys in Diverse Places," by Ambroise Paré, the 16th-century army doctor who pioneered battlefield medicine
• "On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals," by William Harvey, the 1628 paper that examined the operation of the biological circulatory system
• "The Three Original Publications on Vaccination Against Smallpox," by Edward Jenner, who established the field of immunology
• "The Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever," the 1843 article by physician Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. that proposed the germ theory of disease
• "On the Antiseptic Principle of the Practice of Surgery," by Joseph Lister, an 1867 essay that promoted sterile surgical practices
• "Scientific Papers," by Louis Pasteur, the 19th-century French chemist
• "Scientific Papers," by Charles Lyell, the 19th-century British geologist

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LECTURE II A CANDLE: BRIGHTNESS OF THE FLAME AIR NECESSARY FOR COMBUSTION PRODUCTION OF WATER WE were occupied the last time we met in considering the general character and arrangement as regards the fluid portion of a candle, and the way in which that fluid got into the place of combustion. You see, when we have a candle burning fairly in a regular, steady atmosphere, it will have a shape something like the one shown in the diagram, and will look pretty uniform, although very curious in its character. And now I have to ask your attention to the means by which we are enabled to ascertain what happens in any particular part of the flame; why it happens; what it does in happening; and where, after all, the whole candle goes to; because, as you know very well, a candle being brought before us and burned, disappears, if burned properly, without the least trace of dirt in the candle stick; and this is a very curious circumstance. In order, then, to examine this candle carefully, I have arranged certain apparatus, the use of which you will see as I go on. Here is a candle; I am about to put the end of this glass tube into the middle of the flame into that part which old Hooker has represented in the diagram as being rather dark, and which you can see at any time if you will look at a candle carefully, without blowing it about. We will examine this dark part first. Now I take this bent glass tube, and introduce one end into that part of the flame, and you see at once that something is coming from the flame, out at the other end of the tube; and if I put a flask there, and leave it for a little while, you will see that something from the middle part of the flame is gradually drawn out,and goes through the tube,and into that flask, and there behaves very differently from what it...
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