Scientists Behind Earth's Processes

Scientists Behind Earth's Processes

by Andrew Solway
     
 

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This addition to the Sci-Hi series looks at scientists who have made major advances and affected the way we live - men and women, historical and modern, and from a range of cultures. Some are household names, some deserve much greater recognition and credit than they currently receive, and others who have helped us understand the way our planet works'.

Overview

This addition to the Sci-Hi series looks at scientists who have made major advances and affected the way we live - men and women, historical and modern, and from a range of cultures. Some are household names, some deserve much greater recognition and credit than they currently receive, and others who have helped us understand the way our planet works'.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
"When was Earth a snowball?" This and many other intriguing questions are answered in books of the "Sci-Hi" series, which introduces readers to the multitude of scientists, past and present, working in various fields. This volume explores changes in Earth's landmass, climate, and weather, as researched by geologists, paleontologists, meteorologists, and climatologists. Some scientists get spreads, others a page, and still others a short mention in a sidebar; some are famous and some will be unknown to aspiring young scientists, but all have done important work. James Hutton, in the 18th century, concluded that rocks could be formed by heat, erode, and be reconstituted in a "rock cycle." Louis Agassiz studied glaciers and found evidence for an ancient ice age. In the 19th century, William Smith studied fossils to date rocks; today, paleontologist Xu Xing examines dinosaur fossils and believes dinosaurs are ancestors of birds. Alfred Wegener developed the theory that Earth was once a giant landmass that drifted apart, while in the 1960s Tuzo Wilson proposed the idea of tectonic plates. Climate studies have become vital—Syukuro Manabe pioneered using computers to model global climate; meteorologists, accepting Edward Lorenz's chaos theory (accurate predicting is impossible), are seeking greater computer power to improve weather forecasts. Illustrations are mostly color photos on every page, combined with areas of text and sidebars in brightly-colored circles. In an effort to create excitement, color has been added to backgrounds and often in bands around scientists' heads, adding an over-saturated look to some pages. Still, these volumes (including timelines, glossaries, quizzes, and bibliographies) can work well as source books encouraging further research for science projects, reports, biographies, and even careers. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781406221855
Publisher:
Raintree Publishers
Publication date:
01/28/2012
Pages:
48
Lexile:
930L (what's this?)
Age Range:
11 - 14 Years

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