×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Scoliosis; Ascending the Curve
     

Scoliosis; Ascending the Curve

3.0 1
by Brooke Lyons, John Podzius, Oheneba Boachie-Adjei
 
There are roughly five million people in the United States being treated for scoliosis. Every year some half-million new cases are diagnosed—the great majority of them adolescent girls. Untreated, scoliosis causes increaing curvature of the spine—a progressive, debilitating condition that can leave the sufferer permanently bent over and eventually totally

Overview

There are roughly five million people in the United States being treated for scoliosis. Every year some half-million new cases are diagnosed—the great majority of them adolescent girls. Untreated, scoliosis causes increaing curvature of the spine—a progressive, debilitating condition that can leave the sufferer permanently bent over and eventually totally crippled.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
For many scoliosis sufferers, diagnosis and treatment occur during adolescence, so it's fitting that this up-to-date look at the subject comes from Lyons, an 18-year-old Yale freshman and national teen spokesperson for the Scoliosis Association. Lyons joins forces with Boachie-Adjei (chief of scoliosis serivce at New York's Hospital for Special Surgery) and psychologist Podzius to exhaustively cover all the relevant ground. They begin by defining the problem: scoliosis is a deviation in growth, possibly genetic, which causes "a three-dimensional curvature of the spine." While lateral curvature causes a noticeable bend to one side, rotation of the spine also rotates the rib cage, which causes compression of the organs within. The authors describe various types of scoliosis (some straighten by themselves, with physical maturity; some, if left untreated, will progress throughout adulthood) and diagnostic techniques. They then cover treatment: bracing and surgery are the choices, depending on type and severity of the disease. The authors look in detail at surgical complications, pain management techniques, "How to Cope with Physical Challenges and Stigma on a Daily Basis," and the search for a genetic cause. All of this material is interwoven with details of Lyons's own story and those of others. The nuts and bolts of scoliosis: from surgery to social concerns, comprehensive, current advice in the sympathetic and realistic voice of a fellow sufferer.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780871318831
Publisher:
M. Evans & Company
Publication date:
01/28/1999
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
6.36(w) x 9.28(h) x 1.18(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Scoliosis; Ascending the Curve 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
myrnaswart-author More than 1 year ago
I found the book informative and an easy read, however it lacked excitement and was, at times, boring. As the mother of a patient fighting a different long-term chronic illness and the author of a book about that illness,[ASIN:0595470017 There Must Be A Reason: My Daughter's Battle With Wegener's Granulomatosis] I would have liked to read about the reactions and interactions of the families of the author and those people whose case histories she cites. More detail on the doctor-patient relationships and hospital stays Brooke experienced during her battle would have added to the story. I salute Brooke for having the wherewithall to complete and publish her story and share it with the world. What we learn living with chronic illness either personally or within a family setting can help others and I believe Brooke's experiences touch on doing that.