×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

A Score Of Famous Composers
     

A Score Of Famous Composers

by Nathan Haskell Dole
 
Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Overview

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781406768855
Publisher:
Narahari Press
Publication date:
03/15/2007
Pages:
580
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.29(d)

Read an Excerpt


JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH. (1985-17BO.) THE word Bach means brook, and, indeed, like a noble brook is the great family or clan which bears the name. One can trace it back almost to its rise among the Thuringian mountains, flowing down, always clear, pure, and musical, ever receiving new accessions of likewise clear, pure, and musical waters, until at last its beauty and magnificence culminate in the greatest of them all. The genealogist who would trace back ' the Bach family to its source finds himself in a perfect labyrinth there are so many through the course of almost four hundred years, and almost all bear the name of Johann, John. One of the earliest known was Hans Bach, a peasant who labored in the Thuringian mines of Ilmenau. The direct forefather of Johann Sebastian was also Hans Bach, " guardian of the municipality" in 1561. His son Veit was a musical miller and baker, who used to play on his cythringen while the mill clacked merrily, and, as it were, beat time for him. " This," said Johann Sebastian, " was, we may say, the beginning of music among his descendants." Veit's son Hans, Johann Sebastian's great-grandfather, became a " Spielmann," or player, having learned his art under the " city piper" of Gotha. He combined carpet- weaving with fiddling, but he travelled all about thecountry as a Spielmann. " His fiddle " is said to have " sounded merrily, and his head was full of fun." The fun as well as the music was the heritage of his children and his children's children. The Count of Schwarzenburg-Arnstadt sent three of Veit Bach's sons to Italy to study music. By this time there was an almost numberless array of musical Bachs. At Erfurt one branch of the family filled theoffice of town musician for more than a hundred years, and even during the la...

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews