Scorsese by Ebert

Scorsese by Ebert

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by Roger Ebert
     
 

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Roger Ebert wrote the first film review that director Martin Scorsese ever received—for 1967’s I Call First, later renamed Who’s That Knocking at My Door—creating a lasting bond that made him one of Scorsese’s most appreciative and perceptive commentators. Scorsese by Ebert offers the first record of

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Overview

Roger Ebert wrote the first film review that director Martin Scorsese ever received—for 1967’s I Call First, later renamed Who’s That Knocking at My Door—creating a lasting bond that made him one of Scorsese’s most appreciative and perceptive commentators. Scorsese by Ebert offers the first record of America’s most respected film critic’s engagement with the works of America’s greatest living director, chronicling every single feature film in Scorsese’s considerable oeuvre, from his aforementioned debut to his 2008 release, the Rolling Stones documentary Shine a Light.

In the course of eleven interviews done over almost forty years, the book also includes Scorsese’s own insights on both his accomplishments and disappointments. Ebert has also written and included six new reconsiderations of the director’s less commented upon films, as well as a substantial introduction that provides a framework for understanding both Scorsese and his profound impact on American cinema.

"Given their career-long back-and-forth, this collection makes perfect sense. . . . In these reconsiderations, Ebert invites us into his thought processes, letting us see not just what he thinks, but how he forms his opinions. Ebert’s insights into Scorsese are terrific, but this book offers the bonus of further insights into Ebert himself."—Time Out Chicago

"Ebert, film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times, is an unabashed fan of Scorsese, whom he considers ‘the most gifted director of his generation.’ . . . Of special note are interviews with Scorsese over a 25-year period, in which the director candidly discusses his body of work."—Publishers Weekly

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Ebert, film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times, is an unabashed fan of Scorsese, whom he considers "the most gifted director of his generation." To prove it, he's compiled his reviews of every Scorsese film-beginning with I Call First in 1967 to his latest, Shine a Light. Along the way, Ebert pays special tribute to five "masterpieces," including Taxi Driver, Raging Bull and Mean Streets, which he calls "one of the source points of modern movies." These three films in particular, Ebert argues, reflect Scorsese's ongoing preoccupation with sex and guilt, themes fueled by a Catholic upbringing and his childhood in New York City's Little Italy. Citing the director's strong collaboration with actor Robert De Niro and screenwriter Paul Schrader, Ebert says all three men seem "fascinated by the lives of tortured, violent, guilt-ridden characters," usually men who cannot relate to women, such as Travis Bickle in Taxi Driver or Jake LaMotta in Raging Bull. Of special note are interviews with Scorsese over a 25-year period, in which the director candidly discusses his body of work. (Oct.)

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Library Journal

Ebert has been a professional film critic for as long as Martin Scorsese has been a feature-length filmmaker. Icons in their respective fields, they have developed a professional friendship that makes this intimate study all the more fascinating. Both share similar cultural and religious backgrounds, and perhaps this has helped attune Ebert's criticism, be it positive, negative, or respectfully reserved (like his thoughts on Cape Fear and Gangs of New York), to Scorsese's various films. All of Ebert's original reviews are here, along with interviews he has conducted with Scorsese over the years and an occasional reconsideration of such films as Kundun, After Hours, and The Last Temptation of Christ. This book is proof that the greatest criticism is simply careful and educated observation that connects a filmmaker with his subject, his audience, and his time. Ebert is one of the most acclaimed and perceptive critics of his time, and this unique book is an invaluable study in the canon of both film and criticism. Highly recommended for all libraries.
—Peter Thornell

Time - S. James Snyder

"A film-by-film chronicling of the professional, yet passionate, Ebert-Scorsese relationship. Packaged together are every Ebert review of a Scorsese title, as well as an array of essays, interviews, and the transcript of an on-stage discussion between the director and writer. . . . Ebert has also gone back to write an additional 'reconsideration' of a half-dozen select Scorsese titles. . . . A work of obvious affection, even adoration, what might surprise readers most is how Scorsese by Ebert emerges as a work of profound identification."
Movie Maker - Kyle Rupprecht

"Whether you're a Scorsese connoisseur or someone just discovering the acclaimed auteur, Roger Ebert's Scorsese is a thought-provoking appreciaton of more than 40 years of masterful moviemaking."
Antitainment - Anthony Kuzminski

"Scorsese by Ebert is one of the finest books to ever be written on the medium of film. . . . An illuminating and insightful look at a virtuoso director written by a virtuoso journalist; it's the Citizen Kane of film criticism."
Shepherd Express - Michael Bizunowicz

"Already a revered film critic, Ebert is also one of the most perceptive writers living today. And the level of perception present in his syndicated movie reviews is at its peak in this admiringly ciritical book about another revered figure. Through the eyes of Ebert, we go on a reflective journey into the mind of Scorses and, by extension, our own minds."
Choice

"An invaluable, historical resource for the Scorsese scholar and an entertaining, informative document for the Scorsese fan."
Time
A film-by-film chronicling of the professional, yet passionate, Ebert-Scorsese relationship. Packaged together are every Ebert review of a Scorsese title, as well as an array of essays, interviews, and the transcript of an on-stage discussion between the director and writer. . . . Ebert has also gone back to write an additional 'reconsideration' of a half-dozen select Scorsese titles. . . . A work of obvious affection, even adoration, what might surprise readers most is how Scorsese by Ebert emerges as a work of profound identification.

— S. James Snyder

Time Out Chicago

"Given their career-long back-and-forth, this collection makes perfect sense. It’s a project Ebert has talked about for years, and during his recent recovery from surgery, he finally made it a reality. Ebert has collected all of his original reviews of Scorsese’s films, along with interviews and essays on the director. That would be a great thing on its own, but the real strength of this book comes from his new essays about a number of the films. These afford readers a wonderful opportunity to see how someone approaches the same work of art over decades. . . . In these reconsiderations, Ebert invites us into his thought processes, letting us see not just what he thinks, but how he forms his opinions. Ebert’s insights into Scorsese are terrific, but this book offers the bonus of further insights into Ebert himself."

Booklist

"[Eberts'] enthusiasm and conviction are obvious here; accordingly, this is some of his best stuff."
Movie Maker
Whether you're a Scorsese connoisseur or someone just discovering the acclaimed auteur, Roger Ebert's Scorsese is a thought-provoking appreciation of more than 40 years of masterful moviemaking.

— Kyle Rupprecht

Antitainment
Scorsese by Ebert is one of the finest books to ever be written on the medium of film. . . . An illuminating and insightful look at a virtuoso director written by a virtuoso journalist; it's the Citizen Kane of film criticism.

— Anthony Kuzminski

Shepherd Express
Already a revered film critic, Ebert is also one of the most perceptive writers living today. And the level of perception present in his syndicated movie reviews is at its peak in this admiringly ciritical book about another revered figure. Through the eyes of Ebert, we go on a reflective journey into the mind of Scorses and, by extension, our own minds.

— Michael Bizunowicz

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780226182049
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Publication date:
05/15/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
314
Sales rank:
436,614
File size:
419 KB

Meet the Author

Roger Ebert is the Pulitzer Prize–winning film critic of the Chicago Sun-Times. Starting in 1975, he cohosted a long-running weekly movie review program on television, first with Gene Siskel and then with Richard Roeper. He is the author of numerous books on film, including The Great Movies, The Great Movies II, and Awake in the Dark: The Best of Roger Ebert, the last published by the University of Chicago Press.

 

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Scorsese by Ebert 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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CiaG More than 1 year ago
This account of the movies of Martin Scorcese keeps the interest of any reader who is interested in the ins and outs of movie-making as well as those who just love these movies and this incredible director. Who better to evaluate the art created by this Scorcese than this Movie Critic? Ebert's analysis of the motivations behind Scorsese, his reminders of the great shots and scenes, the insight into the detailed and street-trained mind behind these really captures the readers' imagination...putting them center stage....as do Scorsese's movies. The Introduction by Scorsese was a delight...even his refusal to be worthy of so much credit....which, of course he is. This book has broadened my movie-watching experience and made it even more enjoyable. I am so looking forward to Scorsese's use of scenes, lighting and DiCaprio's dramatic looks in Shelter Island and being able to see it through new eyes!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago