Scott Conant's New Italian Cooking: More Than 125 Recipes for Everyday Eating, Relaxed Weekend Cooking, and Elegant Entertaining

Overview

The award-winning chef of two of New York’s most celebrated restaurants presents his fresh, vibrant approach to Italian cooking with recipes that reveal the secrets behind his most acclaimed dishes.

Scott Conant, chef-owner of L’Impero and Alto restaurants in Manhattan, has been thrilling diners and impressing critics since L’Impero opened in 2003. Now he translates his inspired combination of the best of New American cooking with the best of Italian cuisine into more than 130 ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (16) from $5.05   
  • New (7) from $63.76   
  • Used (9) from $5.05   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$63.76
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(214)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
0767916824 New. Has the slightest of shelf wear (like you might see in a major bookstore chain). Looks like an interesting title! We provide domestic tracking upon request, ... provide personalized customer service and want you to have a great experience purchasing from us. 100% satisfaction guaranteed and thank you for your consideration. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$65.00
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(240)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$66.61
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(214)

Condition: New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$124.50
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(9)

Condition: New
2005 Hard cover New in fine dust jacket. Glued binding. Paper over boards. 296 p. Contains: Illustrations. Audience: General/trade.

Ships from: West Van Lear, KY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$134.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(0)

Condition: New
2005 Hard cover First edition. First Edition MINT---Hardcover Edition New in new dust jacket. Never Opened First Edition Glued binding. Paper over boards. 296 p. Contains: ... Illustrations. Audience: General/trade. Ay. Caramba! We pride ourselves in bringing only the very best to the table! Exceptional Quality! Unbeatable Service! @ Ay Caramba! You will find Rare and unusual books in the very best condition. If we don t have what you re looking for we ll do our best to locate it. All our books are in "MINT" condition unless otherwise noted We ship all our books immediately from our location in Southern California! We specialize in quality, rare and collectible First Editions Read more Show Less

Ships from: Las Vegas, NV

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$379.99
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(0)

Condition: New
Brand New, Gift condition We Ship Every Day! Free Tracking Number Included! International Buyers Are Welcome! Satisfaction Guaranteed!

Ships from: Glenview, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$379.99
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(214)

Condition: New
2005-10-25 Hardcover New Brand New, Gift conditionWe Ship Every Day! Free Tracking Number Included! International Buyers Are Welcome! Satisfaction Guaranteed!

Ships from: Skokie, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

The award-winning chef of two of New York’s most celebrated restaurants presents his fresh, vibrant approach to Italian cooking with recipes that reveal the secrets behind his most acclaimed dishes.

Scott Conant, chef-owner of L’Impero and Alto restaurants in Manhattan, has been thrilling diners and impressing critics since L’Impero opened in 2003. Now he translates his inspired combination of the best of New American cooking with the best of Italian cuisine into more than 130 sophisticated but easy-to-follow recipes. Here are the dishes that have garnered national attention and unanimous praise, including melt-in-your-mouth beef short ribs, the creamiest polenta, intoxicatingly fragrant roast chicken, and a deceptively simple Spaghetti with Fresh Tomato Sauce that transforms an everyday meal into something sublime.

Because Scott understands that home cooks don’t often have as much time to spend in the kitchen as they’d like, his New Italian Cooking includes many dishes that suit hectic weekday schedules—meaning they can easily be made in 45 minutes or less—such as Seared and Slow-Roasted Sirloin of Beef or Grilled Shrimp with Mint, Orange, and Fennel Couscous. When he slows things down for the weekend, it’s with luxurious braises and roasts that require more time but not necessarily more effort, including Oven-Braised Lamb Shanks with Red Wine Vinegar and a sumptuous, long-simmering Bolognese Sauce.

Featuring 30 captivating color photos, new insights on Italian ingredients, and friendly yet meticulous instructions, Scott Conant’s New Italian Cooking is a book to turn to again and again for the best of contemporary Italian cuisine.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“When I started reading Scott’s book, I was immediately impressed with his fresh and innovative approach to classical recipes. The simplicity of most of the recipes, make this a must for the kitchen of any Italian-food-loving cook.”
—Pino Luongo, author of Simply Tuscan

“Scott Conant is a fine cook. He combines strong culinary skills with a deliberate flair for the creative and unexpected.”
—Jonathan Waxman, chef, Barbuto

“Simple Italian meets American ingenuity. Good, easy-to-find ingredients matched perfectly with good, easy-to-follow recipes. This book is a wonderful addition to my kitchen bookshelf.”
—Gordon Hamersley, chef-owner, Hamersley’s Bistro

“I have enjoyed Scott’s cooking for years at his restaurant, and now you have the opportunity to do it right in your home. Scott Conant’s New Italian Cooking is a wonderful book where you can see Scott’s true passion for Italian flavors.”
Marcus Samuelsson, chef, Aquavit

“The moment I tasted Scott’s food I knew it was going to be big. The flavors are unique to Italian cuisine. In New Italian Cooking, Scott provides great recipes that allow people to create simple or more intricate meals at home.”
—Dean Fearing, chef, The Mansion on Turtle Creek

“A handsome book of sophisticated, relaxed, and inspired recipes. This book is a must for professionals and home cooks alike.”
—Alfred Portale, chef and co-owner, Gotham Bar and Grill

Publishers Weekly
Conant, chef/owner of New York's L'Impero-which won a James Beard award for the country's best new restaurant in 2003-brings together the best of Old World cooking and modern twists in this sumptuous cookbook. Italian food; the use of fresh, seasonal ingredients; simple foundations giving way to complex flavors-Conant takes all these trends and whips them up into a fabulous mix of recipes, offering a perfect blend of easier weeknight dishes as well as weekend extravaganzas. His food has "an Italian soul": some traditional elements remain, but inventive surprises add excitement. To wit, Conant's Spaghetti Puttanesca (Scotty's Style) uses both plum and cherry tomatoes, and tones down the amount of capers, black olives, anchovy and garlic so that the flavors continue to build as one eats. "Boneless" Osso Bucco turns the classic "bone with a hole" dish into a deeply flavorful revelation thanks to a reversal of order in two of the steps. Conant includes dishes adapted from his restaurant, which may find readers happily spending an entire weekend afternoon in the kitchen, making stews and fresh pasta, as well as quick-cooking fish, chicken and meat dishes. He smartly alerts readers up front as to which recipes fall into which camp and includes plenty of fascinating asides on, for example, seasoning with salt or transforming pantry staples like olive oil and canned beans into the elements of delicious pasta dishes. Wine recommendations accompany each recipe in this invigorating collection. Photos. Agent, Patricia van der Leun. (Oct.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780767916820
  • Publisher: Potter/TenSpeed/Harmony
  • Publication date: 10/25/2005
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 8.22 (w) x 9.71 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Scott Conant is the chef-owner of L’Impero, which was honored with a James Beard award for best new restaurant in the country in 2003. In the spring of 2005, Scott opened Alto, which focuses on the cuisine of northern Italy. Named one of the ten best new chefs in the country in 2004 by Food & Wine, Scott cultivated his cooking style in some of Manhattan’s finest Italian kitchens, including San Domenico, Il Toscanaccio, and Chianti.

Joanne McAllister Smart is the co-author with Gordon Hamersley of Bistro Cooking at Home and editor of Fine Cooking’s Cooking New American, both IACP award winners. A regular contributor to Fine Cooking magazine, she lives in Connecticut with her husband and two children.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Small Tastes

Many recipes in this book--soups, salads, risottos, and pastas--can all work very well as first courses. The recipes in this chapter are really more about the little bites offered at the very start of a dinner or gathering, often before anyone even sits down at the table. In Italy, these are called assagini.

Think of these recipes as opportunities for you to try out new ingredients and flavor combinations that you might shy away from were the dish to be the bulk of the meal. With these small bites you are neither gustatorily nor financially overcommitted. For instance, raw yellowtail with ginger oil and marinated onions (page 29) is a starter my customers clamor for. But you know your crowd better than I do and maybe they are not so sure about raw fish; by serving it as a small bite you relieve yourself and them from any pressure. If it's not to their liking, they know there is more food to come, while you have not broken the bank on what the same amount of fish as a main course would have cost. Admittedly, some of these dishes are on the fancier side. So my suggestion is this: If you are planning on making one of the more elaborate dishes here, keep the pasta course (if you're having one) and the main course simple. A braise, for instance, would be an ideal main course, since you can make it ahead of time and then reheat it on the night you want to serve it. Finally, a few of the recipes contained here, such as the rabbit salad (page 53) and the scallop and farro ragu (page 42), can also make a delicious light lunch.

RAW BLUEFIN TUNA WITH BABY TOMATO SALAD AND MINT

Baby greens or the even smaller microgreens are simply greens that have been picked while still very tiny. They are tender, tasty, and sized right for these small appetizer plates. You'll find them at some supermarkets and specialty stores. Other options include pea shoots, mizuna, and watercress. You could also trim larger leafy greens to size. This starter comes together in minutes if you already have some Peperoncino Oil made; you can also try substituting a good purchased chile oil in place of my homemade infused oil.

MAKES 6 SERVINGS
4 ounces sashimi-quality tuna, preferably bluefin
10 baby tomatoes (pear or cherry,
for example), cut into eighths
1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon red wine vinegar
1 to 2 leaves fresh mint,
finely chopped
1/4 teaspoon snipped fresh chives
A couple pinches of sea salt
A handful of baby or microgreens
1 teaspoon homemade
Peperoncino Oil (page 19)

With a very sharp knife, slice the tuna into six equal slices. In a small bowl, gently toss the tomatoes with the oil, vinegar, mint, chives, and a pinch of sea salt. Divide the tomato salad among six plates. Top each with a slice of tuna. Sprinkle just a smidge of sea salt on each slice of tuna. Top with the baby greens and a drizzle of the Peperoncino Oil. Serve immediately.

WHICH WINE?

This is wonderful with a bubbly glass of rosé; try a spumante from Franciacorta (DOCG) in Lombardy, a region made famous by the outstanding quality of its sparkling wines.

SCALLOP CARPACCIO WITH SCALLIONS AND LEMON

When you eat this dish you may ask yourself: "Why would I ever eat a cooked scallop again?" This recipe is the simplest thing in the world--the bottarga is optional--but within simplicity lies restraint. Make sure the scallops you buy are "dry," have not been treated with chemicals, and are exceedingly fresh.

MAKES 6 SERVINGS

4 large sea scallops,
preferably diver scallops
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 to 2 scallions, sliced very,
very thin on the bias
1 cup micro or baby greens
Sea salt
Bottarga (see page 6), shaved very thin (optional)

SLICE THE SCALLOPS CROSSWISE into very thin rounds, each 1/8 inch thick. Lay the slices in a single layer on a large plate and drizzle with the lemon juice and olive oil. Sprinkle about a teaspoon of the scallions over the scallops, wrap them in plastic wrap, and refrigerate until very cold, at least an hour and up to 4 hours ahead of serving.

When ready to serve, divide the baby greens among six plates and top with the slices of scallops. Sprinkle just a tiny bit of sea salt over each. Finish with the tiniest bit of shaved bottarga. (A bit of bottarga, with its strong fish flavor, can make this dish sing, but too much is unpleasant. You can also leave it off completely.) Drizzle the plate with any remaining olive oil and lemon juice from the scallops and serve immediately.

WHICH WINE?

These sweet scallops would enjoy being paired with a full-bodied Pigato from Liguria, a white wine with enough flavor to stand up to the bottarga.

Raw Fish, Italian Style

During a visit to Italy in 2003, I was surprised to see how popular raw fish is there. But I really shouldn't have been, as crudo, as it's called in Italy, is gaining popularity there. I took such a liking to the way raw fish was handled by young Italian chefs that I started to serve similar dishes in the restaurant. I had no idea that it would be a potential quandary. Customers wanted to know why I was serving sashimi. Well, call it what you want, but in my mind each of these raw fish appetizers has an Italian soul, relying for the most part on classic Italian herbs, robustly flavored oils, and sea salt to complement the subtle flavor of the raw fish.

Maybe this is obvious, but because you are serving the fish raw, it has to be pristine--as fresh and as high a quality as there is. That, in fact, is the only challenging aspect to these recipes. Seek out a trusted fishmonger, and be sure to buy what would be considered sushi or sashimi-quality fish. (Be aware that there are some people, including children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people with impaired immune systems, who should not eat any raw fish.)

Once the warnings have been heeded and you have in your possession some beautiful fish, these are actually fun dishes to make. I give amounts for these recipes, but once you make them, you will no longer need to measure. Just bear in mind that the fish is the main attraction and that the other items are there to accent it--so use them sparingly.

The raw fish starters each make six "two-bite" servings; if you want more, serve fewer people or multiply the recipe. It would be easy (if expensive) to make a lot of these small bites for a party, especially if you get all of the ingredients lined up assembly-line style. Consider them when you're doing some serious entertaining.

FLUKE WITH CITRUS SALAD AND PEPERONCINO OIL

Tiny, triangular pieces of orange, lemon, and lime shimmer on the plate like little jewels. Very sexy looking food! If you can't find fluke, also called summer flounder, try yellowfin tuna.

MAKES 6 SERVINGS

4 ounces sashimi-quality fluke
1 lemon
1 lime
1 small orange
1/4 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon Peperoncino Oil
(page 19)
A couple pinches of sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

WITH A VERY SHARP KNIFE, slice the fluke into twelve very thin slices. Segment the lemon, lime, and orange in the following way: Cut both ends off of the fruit. Using a sharp, flexible knife and a sawing motion, cut the skin and white membrane away from top to bottom following the contours. Free two segments from each fruit by cutting along the seams that separate one segment from the other. Squeeze some of the remaining lemon to get some fresh juice. Cut the segments into small pieces and toss them with the lemon juice and extra virgin olive oil.

Put one slice each of the fluke on 6 small plates. Top with half of the citrus segments. Dot each piece with a little Peperoncino Oil and season very lightly with the sea salt and pepper. Top with another layer of fish, citrus, Peperoncino Oil, sea salt, and black pepper. Serve immediately.

WHICH WINE?

Try a Verdicchio di Matelica (DOC), which is dry, soft, and harmonious, with a brilliant pale yellow color that makes it a wonderful pour with delicately flavored raw fish starters.

YELLOWTAIL WITH OLIO DI ZENZERO AND MARINATED ONIONS

This is my favorite raw fish. Even though they are used sparingly, the marinated red onions add an amazing depth and roundness; their texture is also a welcome surprise. While ginger isn't exactly thought of as an Italian ingredient (even though I do write it in Italian here and on my menu), its personality becomes somewhat subdued when infused in olive oil. It is not the main flavor, but rather it adds an intriguing background to the dish. Yes, this dish calls for not one but two infused oils as well as marinated onions. But you will have made these ahead of time so that when it comes to assembly, you're done in just a few minutes. People just go crazy over the flavors of this dish. In fact, you may want to double the recipe because everyone is going to want more!

MAKES 6 SERVINGS

4 ounces sashimi-quality yellowtail
1 teaspoon Peperoncino Oil
(page 19)
1 teaspoon Olio di Zenzero
(page 19)
Pinch of sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon finely chopped Marinated Red Onions (page 18)

WITH A VERY SHARP KNIFE, slice the fish into six pieces and place each on a small plate. Top each with a "dot" of the Peperoncino Oil and about three "dots" of the Olio di Zenzero. Sprinkle with just a touch of sea salt and black pepper. Sprinkle some of the chopped red onions over the fish and serve immediately.

WHICH WINE?

With this, my favorite raw fish dish, I like a glass of Soave Classico (DOC) Superiore; its elegant aroma, full of peaches and piecrust, works magic with the bright gingery flavor of this dish.

CITRUS-CURED SALMON

A side of cured salmon is a beautiful sight on a table full of hors d'oeuvres. You can serve it as is with little toasts and some honey mustard or creme fraiche and let people slice it themselves. If you're feeling more formal, dice the silken salmon and gently mix it with fresh snipped chives and a little olive oil, or use it as part of a colorful little salad topped with horseradish cream (recipe follows). This is really simple to make, but it requires the best-quality salmon you can get and needs to cure for three days before it's ready to be served.

MAKES 15 TO 20 SERVINGS

1 whole side of fresh salmon, filleted and skin on
1 1/4 cups kosher salt
1 cup dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon yellow mustard seeds
1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
1 bunch fresh dill
1 bunch fresh parsley
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
1 lemon, thinly sliced
1 lime, thinly sliced
1 orange, thinly sliced
1/4 cup olive oil (not extra virgin)
1/4 cup white wine

REMOVE ANY PINBONES FROM THE SALMON. Trim the stomach flaps if necessary for a neater presentation. On a sided platter or sheet pan large enough to hold the fish, gently rub the salt onto both sides of the salmon. Lay the salmon skin side down and cover with plastic wrap. Place another sheet pan, platter, or a cutting board on top of the length of the fish and weight it lightly. Refrigerate the salmon for 12 to 24 hours.

Remove the weights, unwrap the salmon, and gently wipe off the excess salt and moisture. (Do not rinse it!) Lay the salmon skin side down on the platter. Sprinkle the sugar, mustard seeds, and black pepper over the length of the fish. Next cover the fish with the dill, parsley, onion, lemon, lime, and orange, distributing and layering the ingredients as evenly as you can along the length of the fish. Drizzle the olive oil and white wine over everything. Cover the salmon with plastic wrap, weight it again, and refrigerate for 24 hours.

Unwrap the salmon and spoon any accumulated juices onto it.

Carefully turn the salmon over (don't worry about rearranging the marinade ingredients, just let them fall onto the platter and rest the fish on top of everything). Once again cover the fish with plastic wrap, weight it, and refrigerate for 24 to 36 hours. Unwrap the fish, gently scrape any remaining marinade mixture off the salmon, and pat it dry. The salmon will keep in the refrigerator for a week.

TO SLICE THE SALMON
Use a long, thin, very sharp knife and begin at the tapered, tail end. Cut thin slices across the grain at an angle almost parallel to the work surface.

TO DICE THE SALMON
Remove larger "blocks" of flesh and dice.

WHICH WINE?
A dry (secco) Moscato, especially one from Alto Adige, would taste terrific with the cured salmon.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2013

    Exceptional. Felt like I was listening to the way he critiques t

    Exceptional. Felt like I was listening to the way he critiques the shows he judges and the way the food turned out was equally as impeccable. As close to professional food at home as you can truly get. He manages to bring the true Scarpetta experience to your home.
    In the colloquial sense, "scarpetta" means "little shoe." This "little shoe" typically is a proper piece of bread acting as an appropriate vessel to accompany and juxtapose the meal it is with. It is used to clean and clear the plate while doing the same to ones palate. This by far is more a Soiluthern Italian tradition than Northern as Northern Italians typically don't eat bread with, for example, pasta. The essence of doing so is to savor every last bite and taste so as to not waste any. And, with his recipes, you will want to make double and extra bread just to "fare la scarpetta".even more!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 2, 2013

    Fully enjoyable and delicious recipes!!

    Fully enjoyable and delicious recipes!!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)