Scott Fitzgerald: A Biography

Scott Fitzgerald: A Biography

2.0 1
by Jeffrey Meyers
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Scott Fitzgerald, a romantic and tragic figure who embodied the decades between the two world wars, was a writer who took his material almost entirely from his life. Despite his early success with The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald battled against failure and disappointment.

This book, by the acclaimed biographer of Hemingway, is the first to analyze frankly

…  See more details below

Overview

Scott Fitzgerald, a romantic and tragic figure who embodied the decades between the two world wars, was a writer who took his material almost entirely from his life. Despite his early success with The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald battled against failure and disappointment.

This book, by the acclaimed biographer of Hemingway, is the first to analyze frankly the meaning as well as the events of Fitzgerald's life and to illuminate the recurrent patterns that reveal his inner self. Meyers emphasizes Fitzgerald's alcoholism, Zelda's illnesses and her doctors, Fitzgerald's love affairs both before and after her breakdown, and his wide-ranging friendships, from the polo star Tommy Hitchcock to the Hollywood executive Irving Thalberg. His writer friends included Ring Lardner, John Dos Passos, James Joyce, Edith Wharton, and Dorothy Parker. His friend and lifelong hero, Ernest Hemingway, was a harsh critic of both his behavior and his novels, but Fitzgerald accepted this with remarkable humility. Meyers portrays the volatile connection between these two writers and Fitzgerald's marriage to the schizophrenic Zelda with insight and poignancy. Meyers also discusses Fitzgerald's fascinating relationship with his daughter, Scottie. Exercising a fine critical balance, he details Fitzgerald's weaknesses but ultimately reveals a man capable of fierce loyalty and great moral courage.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Paul Theroux
“Marvelous—clear-sighted, humane and appreciative.”
Booklist
“Meyers provides us with a dizzying number of anecdotes about Fitzgerald’s dismaying behavior, profligacy, and fear of sexual intimacy and inadequacy, but it is Meyers’ compassionate interpretation of Fitzgerald’s weaknesses and appreciation for his achievements that make this an invaluable and unforgettable portrait.”
Toronto Star
“[A] culmination of decades of biographical exploration....Meyers is particularly interested in those areas of Fitzgerald’s life that other biographers have not sufficiently covered.”
Booknews
Meyers (fellow of the Royal Society of Literature) illuminates the recurrent patterns that reveal Fitzgerald's inner self, and portrays the volatile connection between Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. Meyers emphasizes Fitzgerald's alcoholism, his wife Zelda's schizophrenia, and the writer's wide-ranging friendships with important literary figures of his day. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
The Toronto Star
[A] culmination of decades of biographical exploration....Meyers is particualrly interested in those areas of Fitzgerald's life that other biographers have not sufficiently covered.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062316950
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/11/2014
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
480
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Jeffrey Meyers, a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, has written fifty-two books, including Samuel Johnson: The Struggle, The Genius and the Goddess: Arthur Miller and Marilyn Monroe, Orwell: Life and Art, John Huston: Courage and Art, Remembering Iris Murdoch, and Thomas Mann's Artist-Heroes. His books have been translated into fourteen languages and seven alphabets, and published on six continents.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Scott Fitzgerald 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
F. Scott Fitzgerald was America's (perhaps the world's) first truly professional novelist. That his achievements defied the odds--given his health problems and his marriage to the schizophrenic Zelda--is missed by Mr. Meyers. That's too bad, for such an acclaimed biographer. The author's standards for good character are so high that no writer of fiction, alive or dead, could clear his hurdle. Worse, Meyers uses Fitzgerald's own hyper-critical self-assessment against him. Any serious student of Fitzgerald's life knows that he was his own most severe critic, and that he never flinched at brutal evaluations from others, including his disloyal friend, Ernest Hemingway. Fitzgerald's loyalty, compassion, and courage eclipsed that of his critics.