The Scottish Chiefs

The Scottish Chiefs

3.8 13
by Jane Porter
     
 

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The Scottish Chiefs By Jane Porter. Originally published in 1931. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. Obscure Press are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork. Contents Include: The Mysterious…  See more details below

Overview

The Scottish Chiefs By Jane Porter. Originally published in 1931. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. Obscure Press are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork. Contents Include: The Mysterious Box Fight in The Streets of Lanark-Ellerslie Flight of Wallace Murder of Lady Wallace Corie Lin Lanark castle Death of Heselrigge Cartlane Crags-Bothwell Castle Bothwell Castle-The Priory of St Fillans The Convent of Saint Fillans Soulis Attacks Lady Helen-She is Rescued The Hermits Ceil The Forest of Glenfinlas The March to Dumbarton Capture of Dumbarton Castle The citadel Lady Mar The Rocks of Arran-The Isle of Bute Lady Mar and Wallace-Massacre-Massacre at Ayr The Seige of Berwick The March of Sterling Defeat of de Warenne Sterling Castle The Carse of Stirling-Waallace Regent of Scotland The Council Hall The Governor's Apartments

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Editorial Reviews

Emma Clery Southampton University
"Fiona Price's edition of Jane Porter's The Scottish Chiefs (1810) confirms its place as a key work in the development of the Romantic novel. In her wide-ranging introduction Price not only explores the novel's reputation as an influential precursor to Walter Scott's historical romances, but also establishes its topical force as an eloquent intervention on masculinity, heroism, and patriotism written at the height of the war against Napoleon. Price's authoritative account of the author's life and literary network is a valuable contribution to the history of women's writing. The appendices, highlighting Porter's editorial supplements, the critical controversy surrounding the novel, and other versions of the legend of William Wallace, provide fascinating insights into print culture and the workings of historical memory."
From the Publisher

“Fiona Price’s edition of Jane Porter’s The Scottish Chiefs (1810) confirms its place as a key work in the development of the Romantic novel. In her wide-ranging introduction Price not only explores the novel’s reputation as an influential precursor to Walter Scott’s historical romances, but also establishes its topical force as an eloquent intervention on masculinity, heroism, and patriotism written at the height of the war against Napoleon. Price’s authoritative account of the author’s life and literary network is a valuable contribution to the history of women’s writing. The appendices, highlighting Porter’s editorial supplements, the critical controversy surrounding the novel, and other versions of the legend of William Wallace, provide fascinating insights into print culture and the workings of historical memory.” — Emma Clery, Southampton University

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940025447597
Publisher:
S. Andrus
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
861 KB

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Read an Excerpt


ence he hoped to make his peace with hue by Jw gnM he would show to set him at liberty. Wallace, meanwhile, who fully comprehended /iit wt his enemy s views, and what ought to r,a his nr,i. r.Ki.i.s..rc? as soon as he saw the unhappy group disappear from the battlements of the Keep, recalled hia men from the inner ballium wall; and stationing several detachments along the ramparts and in the towers of the outer wall, left De Valence in the guard-room of the barbican under the charge of Lord Ruthven, who was.eager himself to hold the means that were to check the threaie1.ied danger of relatives so dear to him as were the prisandduM in the castle. CHAPTER IV, WALLACE, baring disposed part of his men in com manding posts aranddiidthe town, went forward with hischo sen troops toward the place where, from the information of his scouts, he decried it most likely he should intercept De Warrenn to take his position upon an advantageous ground about half a mile from Stirling, near to the abbey of Cambns- kennpth. The Forth lay before him, crossed by a wooden bridge, over which the enemy must pass to reach him, as the river was not in that part fordable, and some late rains had rendered it at present particularly swollen. The beams which supported this bridge, he ordered to be sawed at the bottom; but not moved in the least, that thev might stand perfectly firm for as long as he should deem ft necessary. To each beam were fastened strong ropes; all of which were held by some of his sturdiest Lanerkers who lay concealed among the rushes. These preparations being made he dre up his troops in order of battle.—Kirkpatrick and Murray commanded the flanks. In the centre stood Wallace himself,with Ramsay on one side of him, and Ed- Win with Scry mgeour on the other, awaiting with ste...

Meet the Author

Fiona Price is Lecturer in English at the University of Chichester.

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