Screwtape Letters by C. S. Lewis | 9780060652890 | Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Screwtape Letters

Screwtape Letters

4.2 136
by C. S. Lewis
     
 

ISBN-10: 0060652896

ISBN-13: 9780060652890

Pub. Date: 03/01/2001

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

In this humorous and perceptive exchange between two devils, C. S. Lewis delves into moral questions about good vs. evil, temptation, repentance, and grace. Through this wonderful tale, the reader emerges with a better understanding of what it means to live a faithful life.

Overview

In this humorous and perceptive exchange between two devils, C. S. Lewis delves into moral questions about good vs. evil, temptation, repentance, and grace. Through this wonderful tale, the reader emerges with a better understanding of what it means to live a faithful life.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060652890
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/01/2001
Series:
C. S. Lewis Signature Classics
Edition description:
GIFT
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
122,550
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.81(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

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The Screwtape Letters 4.2 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 136 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Screwtape Letters makes you think in a fashion that is unexpected. C.S. Lewis puts into words the unnoticed ideas and processes that go on everyday. The indirect (everything in the Screwtape Letters is indirect) messages concerning morality and faith are still valid today. It is eerie to realize that the same battles over worldliness have gone on since time began.
Moriarty More than 1 year ago
The Screwtape Letters, by C.S. Lewis, consists of a series of correspondence between Screwtape, an administrator of relatively high (or, from his point of view, low) position in Satan's bureaucracy; and his nephew Wormwood, a junior tempter just graduated from "temptation college," as it were. These letters -or at least those of Screwtape to Wormwood, we never read the actual replies- concern Wormwood's attempts to secure an ordinary man's soul for hell. This demonic point of view makes for an interesting read. One note about the book is how, due to the viewpoint, there is a complete reversal of good and bad. Screwtape regards human "virtues" as exceedingly detrimental to the cause, and vices just their opposite. Satan becomes "our father below," and God as we know him is "the Enemy." If Screwtape recommends that Wormwood ought to encourage something in his Patient's (the person he is assigned to, and the human focus of the book) life, then we, as people, ought to discourage it. (Hence, Screwtape's being "low" in his master's service, mentioned earlier.) At first, this can be rather confusing; "Screwtape's black is our white." (Lewis, the forward.) It takes a moment to change back, transforming "good" back into bad, so that his "advice" can become helpful to the reader. However, after becoming used to the style, one can easily execute this reversal without much thought. I found the book to be just fantastic. It is chock full of advice to aid the common Christian on their way, and I for one believe it is one book besides the Bible itself that every Christian should read. Of course, this overwhelmingly positive perception might not prove true for all. Lewis' very 20th century-British style might prove less accessible for some; and what seems to be of infinite importance to one might appear rather insignificant to someone else. Others still might think it just plain weird. But that does not change it for me; after initially picking up the book I have read it through three times and promptly proceeded to order a C.S. Lewis 'essentials' paperback box-set.
AmordeDios More than 1 year ago
A creative and thought provoking take on the reality of spiritual warfare.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In the reading of the book one is whisked away as if he was Uncle Screwtape's pupil himself. Wonderful book to wake you up to how the other side thinks.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
First, this doesn't say who the narrator is. Reviews mentioned John Cleese. First got an email of order confirmation. Second email, delays. Third email said this order is cancelled unless you reply. I didn't reply. Fourth email said 'shipped'. Not John Cleese. Tried to leave this review. Website doesn't respond. Second try, insisted on my account credentials. Couldn't just leave a review. Third try, signed in. Got my chance to whine. I'm all done with B&N.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"It is funny how mortals always picture us as putting things into their minds: in reality our best work is done by keeping things out..." When people picture temptation, they usually picture a man with horns, red skin, and a pitchfork standing on their shoulder and whispering in their ear, maybe pausing to giggle or argue with the angel that is always standing on the opposite shoulder. But to C.S. Lewis, temptation was a business, a department of Hell with its own hierarchy ("Lowerarchy"), positions, and rules. The Screwtape Letters chronicles the letters between Screwtape, an under-secretary in Hell, and his nephew Wormwood, a junior tempter trying to lead an average British man astray. In these letters, Screwtape advises Wormwood on how best to corrupt the man, who they call "the patient", as well as offering some general advice on steering the human soul towards Hell. At first glance, the book would seem like the farthest thing from Christian literature. But after reading it, I can say that The Screwtape Letters is the most compelling argument for Christianity I've ever encountered. When I first started reading the book, I knew it would be praising Christianity. It was C.S. Lewis after all, and a book about leading humans away from "the right path". I figured it would be a bunch of thinly veiled praises of God and Christianity in general. But the book really isn't about Christianity. It's about human nature, and the struggle for humans to look beyond themselves and their problems. The whole book is actually a beautiful example of antithesis, showing the reader what is right by promoting what is clearly wrong. The book actually addressed a lot of criticisms of Christianity, like the ease of conversion and the corruption of the Church. Instead of promoting Christianity above all else, Lewis instead encouraged a more charitable and humble attitude in general, saying that, not the patient's religion, is what got him into Heaven. Of course, the book does include plenty of Christian ideas, but they're all presented in a positive way, like when Lewis says, "We want cattle who can finally become food; He wants servants who can finally become sons." Even though the language is tough and the philosophical concepts can be hard to digest, I would recommend this book. It's a stimulating look at the complex motivations and behaviors of good and evil, and it praises the appropriate use of religion without getting too denominational. C.S. Lewis is a beautiful writer, and what he writes about morality and God's infinite love is more compelling than any evangelical sermon. I'm a stout atheist, and my beliefs haven't changed after reading this book. However, I feel like I'm a little more conscious of what I think about others and how I live my life thanks to this book. And I don't think anyone can criticize that.
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