Scribus 1.3.5 Beginner's Guide

Scribus 1.3.5 Beginner's Guide

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by Cedric Gemy
     
 

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This step-by-step guide packed with interesting examples and screenshots is for anyone who wants to create professional-looking documents using Scribus. No experience of desktop publishing software is needed. Each of the eleven chapters deals with an aspect of Scribus, starting with a description of the graphic tool chain followed by drawing a simple and attractive…  See more details below

Overview

This step-by-step guide packed with interesting examples and screenshots is for anyone who wants to create professional-looking documents using Scribus. No experience of desktop publishing software is needed. Each of the eleven chapters deals with an aspect of Scribus, starting with a description of the graphic tool chain followed by drawing a simple and attractive business card. Next you learn to manage and structure the pages of your document then how to import text, set type style, and use replacement and hyphenation tools. You learn about frames and how to modify or distort shapes; how to add pictures or vector drawings and the best format for each purpose; how Scribus handles advanced color features and how to be sure they are set for a good print result. At the end, you'll know how to produce a perfect PDF file for a print job or the Web with effects, buttons, and JavaScript interactivity, and how to extend the document capacities and Scribus tools with simple Python programming.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781849513005
Publisher:
Packt Publishing
Publication date:
12/09/2010
Pages:
348
Sales rank:
992,753
Product dimensions:
7.51(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.75(d)

Meet the Author

Cedric G�my is a French freelance graphic designer and training advisor who lives in Rennes but travelling a lot to teach Scribus, Gimp, and Inkscape. He has worked with those software applications since around 2003. Besides these freelance activities, he also teaches communication design in some French universities and private schools. He is an active member of the Scribus and Inskcape teams, involved in the user interface refactoring project of the first and in the documentation of the latter. He is a creator of the French Free Graphic Designer Association (AFGRAL) and FLOSSMANUALS Francophon. This is his fifth book for he has already written two about Gimp, one published under GPL license, one about Inskcape, and one in French about Scribus.

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Scribus 1. 3. 5 beginner's Guide 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Boudville More than 1 year ago
Imagine, a program that specialises to just doing layout?! At first this might seem overkill; too much of an [unnecessary?] niche perhaps. Yet the book persuasively shows that there is a need for, at least, free software that focuses on layout and does it well. Gemy forthrightly points out at the start of the book what the functional perimeter of Scribus is. Specifically, you should use a dedicated word processor like Microsoft Office/Word, or OpenOffice Writer, to actually write and spell check any text that you want to put into a PDF document that will have multiple pages and graphics on those pages. Scribus does not attempt to impinge on this text ability. Also, if you need to have photos in those graphics, and you need to do touching up or other enhancements, then use Photoshop or some other equivalent package. And if you need to draw an image, consider using Adobe Illustrator or something similar. It is the integration of drawn images, photos and text into a cohesive layout that is Scribus' remit. That being said, Scribus can certainly handle many low level useful manipulations that are also handled by those other packages. For example, kerning, which is the altering of white space between letters, can be manipulated explicitly under Scribus. This is useful for the hopefully rare occasions when you need to optimise the appearance of some text under display. Likewise, Scribus can access all the fonts defined under the operating system. Attention has been paid to transparent font management, which eases the explicit burden on you. The questions ['pop quiz'] at the end of most chapters is a little different from the typical Packt book. It is as though Gemy is trying to imitate an actual 'teaching' text that is used to accompany some college computing class. Not a bad idea. But the questions seem too short and simple. They don't really challenge the reader much, except in the most cursory sense. Better perhaps might have been to have more questions and a gradation of difficulty, to give a serious reader something solid to tackle.