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Sea Soup: Zooplankton
     

Sea Soup: Zooplankton

by Mary M. Cerullo
 

* Notable Books for Children, Smithsonian ** Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children—Children’s Book Council/NSTA ** Honor Book, Society of School Librarians International *
How do we learn about animals that are tiny enough to slip through the eye of a needle? Mary Cerullo’s text answers intriguing questions about these tiny ocean

Overview

* Notable Books for Children, Smithsonian ** Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children—Children’s Book Council/NSTA ** Honor Book, Society of School Librarians International *
How do we learn about animals that are tiny enough to slip through the eye of a needle? Mary Cerullo’s text answers intriguing questions about these tiny ocean creatures, while Bill Curtsinger’s extraordinary photographs serve up tantalizing images of an amazing “sea soup.”What is the fastest animal in the world? What can dive as deep as a whale or make a submarine disappear in the ocean? The answer is zooplankton! The ocean is teeming with these small, drifting animals that come in all shapes ands sizes, from tiny zippy copepods to large, brilliantly colored jellyfish (that you don't want to bump into).There are some very strange zooplankton, like the arrow worm — you can see what it had for lunch inside its stomach! Some zooplankton give off a ghostly underwater glow, and others are poisonous, like the sea wasp, a jellyfish that has killed more swimmers of Queensland in northern Australia than the great white shark.Some zooplankton are "temporary" zooplankton, drifting along on ocean currents when they are young, but turning into fish or crustaceans when they grow up and swim on their own. Other zooplankton and zooplankton all their lives — or until they get eaten! Zooplankton are an important meal in the ocean food web. A single blue whale may devour up to eight tons of shrimp-like krill a day. That's a big serving of sea soup!Bill Curtsinger's extraordinary photography brings us right into the watery world of zooplankton, while Mary Cerullo's lively text answers our questions about these fascinating ocean creatures.

Editorial Reviews

Smithsonian --Notable Books for Children
“The invisible world that underlies our living ocean, admirably elucidated.”
Smithsonian —Notable Books for Children
“The invisible world that underlies our living ocean, admirably elucidated.”
Children's Literature
The ocean is teeming with all kinds of small, drifting animals called zooplankton. These amazing creatures range in size from tiny copepods and krill to larger jellyfish and Portuguese man-of-wars. This informative resource introduces readers to these intriguing creatures and their magnificent undersea world. The author answers a variety of questions regarding zooplankton, including "Who are the ugly ducklings of the ocean?" "What is the fastest animal in the world?" "Can zooplankton really make a submarine disappear?" "Are there zooplankton you don't want to bump into?" and "How do scientists track the elusive zooplankton?" Extraordinary full-color photographs perfectly capture the mystery and beauty of the ocean's underwater realm and give youngsters a close-up look at a variety of "sea soup" members. In addition to spectacular photos, this book also contains lively text, interesting facts, a glossary and a bibliography. This captivating reference will make an excellent addition to school libraries. Educators should also check out the previously published companion volume Sea Soup: Phytoplankton and the available teacher's guide. 2001, Tilbury House Publishers/Gulf of Maine Aquarium, $16.95. Ages 8 to 12. Reviewer: Debra Briatico
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-A companion to this team's Sea Soup: Phytoplankton (Tilbury House, 1999), Zooplankton opens a pellucid window into the drifting world of mostly minute animals that, along with phytoplankton, form an aqueous "soup" that nourishes a wide variety of sea creatures from the tiniest copepods to gigantic blue whales. Curtsinger's often extraordinary color photos allow readers to envision the often microscopically small creatures delineated in the text, while Cerullo invites them to meet the fastest animal in the world and to discover how zooplankton can turn a submarine "invisible." This is a fascinating look at a watery zoo of creatures whose ecological importance is far beyond the measure of their size.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780884482192
Publisher:
Tilbury House Publishers
Publication date:
01/28/2001
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.40(w) x 10.40(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
NC1120L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Mary Cerullo decided at thirteen that she ought to become an oceanographer. Although her career has always centered around the ocean, she discovered that she preferred exploring many different topics, which led her to teach and write about the ocean instead. She has written fourteen nonfiction books for children on ocean life.
She likes to immerse herself in her topic, so a few years ago Mary accompanied
Jeff on an underwater dive with ten Caribbean reef sharks. Mary's "day job" is associate director of Friends of Casco Bay, an environmental group in South Portland, Maine.

Bill Curtsinger, like many explorers before him, first traveled to Antarctica as a young sailor. He was in the Navy Combat Camera Group, assigned to photograph the work of National Science Foundation researchers. In the years since, Bill's photography has appeared in numerous books and magazines, including National Geographic, Life, Time, Newsweek, Outside, Natural History, and Smithsonian.

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