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Sea Throne (Book #3 of the Seaborn Trilogy)
     

Sea Throne (Book #3 of the Seaborn Trilogy)

4.0 3
by Chris Howard
 
Sea Throne is the sequel to Seaborn (Juno Books). Kassandra prepares for war against her grandfather, and is confronted on all sides. Nikasia, the daughter of the king's war-bard--who claims descendant from Circe--seeks revenge for the murder of her father. A group of immortals bands together to take everything away, and Kassandra must take them on while holding her

Overview

Sea Throne is the sequel to Seaborn (Juno Books). Kassandra prepares for war against her grandfather, and is confronted on all sides. Nikasia, the daughter of the king's war-bard--who claims descendant from Circe--seeks revenge for the murder of her father. A group of immortals bands together to take everything away, and Kassandra must take them on while holding her family together.

Praise for Seaborn:

"From the first page of Seaborn, you are immersed. Chris Howard navigates a wild ride through a brilliantly edgy and richly atmospheric alter-world. Here is a fresh, formidable spin on fantasy, and Howard is a talent to watch out for. Seaborn will leave you spellbound."
--Adele Griffin, author of where I want to be

"Dark and atmospheric, Seaborn is an imaginative new entry in the world of paranormal fiction."
--Liz Maverick, author of Wired, a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2007

"...a fresh and entertaining read and I fully expect we will be hearing more from Chris Howard in the future."
--SciFiGuy

"Fascinating read..." --Romantic Times 4 star review

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012261625
Publisher:
Lykeion Books
Publication date:
03/01/2011
Series:
The Seaborn Trilogy by Chris Howard
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
253,673
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Chris Howard writes science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. He finished his fifth novel in June, and is working on the next in a new series. His first novel Seaborn (Juno Books) came out July 2008. His short stories have appeared in a bunch of places, mostly online zines, "Lost Dogs and Fireplace Archeology" to Fantasy Magazine (June, 2010). He won the Heinlein Centennial Short Fiction Contest in 2007 for his story "Hammers and Snails" (amateur division).
Chris Howard is also an illustrator, working in ink, watercolors, and digital formats. He have a pen and ink illustration in issue 10 of Shimmer Magazine. His weekly updated graphic novel Saltwater Witch keeps him busy.

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Sea Throne (Book #3 of the Seaborn Trilogy) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
payton_sage More than 1 year ago
"Sea Throne" is the third novel in "The Seaborne Trilogy". Told in third person, it is a mix of subplots that are designed to fit together to enhance the overall series plot line. Kassandra, now the heir of Poseidon's throne and gifts, manipulates multiple characters' lives towards accomplishing the wreath's goals. Kassandra is pretty much just a shell at this point. Most of what the reader saw of her in "The Sea Witch" is gone; however her mentality is more stable than in "Seaborne." Even though she has the power to save her aunt and to defeat her grandfather, she takes her time manipulating those around her while allowing sacrifices to be made. Overall, I felt like the story line was a bit choppy. In "The Sea Witch" I learned to empathize with Kassandra. Diving deeper into her story is what made her likeable. I think if Howard chose to make this series five books long instead of three, but while using all the material he already has as an advance outline; he could have expanded on the subplots which would have allowed the reader to grow fond of the characters. There are also instances where events are mentioned, but the reader has to imagine on their own what happened. I found that to be pretty annoying because they resolved certain issues without actually showing the resolution. Other than that, the series kept my interest. There are unique concepts and subplots.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago