Searching for Candlestick Park [NOOK Book]

Overview

Life has been tough for Spencer since his dad left. His mom complains constantly, they never seem to have enough money, and they're always having to move. He knows his father works for the Giants baseball team and lives somewhere in San Francisco--and Spencer's sure that if he can somehow get there, his dad will take him in. But California is a long, dangerous way from Seattle if you've only got fourteen ...
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Searching for Candlestick Park

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Overview

Life has been tough for Spencer since his dad left. His mom complains constantly, they never seem to have enough money, and they're always having to move. He knows his father works for the Giants baseball team and lives somewhere in San Francisco--and Spencer's sure that if he can somehow get there, his dad will take him in. But California is a long, dangerous way from Seattle if you've only got fourteen dollars, you're twelve, and you're alone.

Determined to find his father and relive their good times, twelve-year-old Spencer takes his cat, slips away from home in Seattle, and sets out for San Francisco's Candlestick Park.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Uma Krishnaswami
Spencer and his mom are always short of money-but does that mean moving in the middle of the night? And being forced to get rid of his cat? So Spencer, whom we love unconditionally by the time we've hit page 4, does the only honorable thing - he takes Foxey the cat and heads from Seattle to San Francisco to look for his father, whose address and phone number he does not know. Well, Dad's a Giants fan, so there's only one possible destination, right? Kehret captures the simultaneous clear certainty and absolute confusion of a twelve-year-old boy's vision and holds her readers captive through this novel of adventure and growth and the meaning of family.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6Life has hit the skids for 12-year-old Spencer Atwood. Since his parents' divorce, money has been very tight. When he and his mother are forced to move out of the house they can no longer afford, he is told that he cannot keep his cat, Foxey. Spencer takes his pet and leaves for San Francisco to find his estranged father, who, based on a recent postcard, might work at Candlestick Park. The journey tests the boy's principles when he is forced to steal food and transportation. His money lost, he puts his trust in a kind old man who agrees to care for Foxey temporarily. Arriving at the ballpark, Spencer finds his father, but soon realizes that he can't live with him. The boy returns to Mr. Woodworth's house, hoping that he and the cat can live there, but finds that the old man has just died of a heart attack after changing his will and leaving his savings to Spencer. Beneath the easily met challenges and the convenient ending is a warm story of a boy's emotional growth. While his mother is self-absorbed and oblivious to the importance of her son's relationship with his pet, Spencer is a likable, self-reliant young man with strong values. The ballpark and cat on the cover will attract readers, but it is Spencer's strength of character and his bond with Foxey that make the book work.Jeanette Larson, Texas State Library, Austin
Kirkus Reviews
Looking for a place where he and his cat can stay, a Seattle boy treks to San Francisco in this ingenuous cautionary adventure from Kehret (Small Steps, 1996, etc.).

Behind in the rent, and with the car about to be repossessed, Spencer's mother decamps in the middle of the night, finding temporary refuge for herself and Spencer across town, at Aunt May's. She tells them that Spencer's cat, Foxey, has to go; desperate to keep him, Spencer forces him into a box and heads for San Francisco on a stolen bike, hoping to find his father. Kehret has an agenda, but she makes her points indirectly: Spencer experiences more discomfort than danger (although he is robbed by other runaways), and acts in ways he knows are wrong, from theft to hitchhiking. Foxey is far more troublesome than the hazards of the trip, and Spencer's efforts to keep his terrified pet from running off come close to mistreatment. They arrive in San Francisco by chance—retired carpenter, Hank Woodworth, pays Spencer's bus fare and takes Foxey in temporarily. Spencer finds his father, and Hank dies, leaving Spencer a college trust fund and ready cash for his mother. It's a distressingly tidy resolution, but Spencer's impulsive escapade may give readers infatuated with the notion of running away some second thoughts.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101661734
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 9/27/1999
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 160
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • File size: 947 KB

Meet the Author

Peg Kehret was born in Wisconsin, grew up in Minnesota, spent fourteen years in California, and now lives with her husband in Washington State. They have two grown children, four grandchildren, one dog, and one cat.



Peg's novels for children are regularly recommended by the American Library Association, the International Reading Association, and the Children's Book Council. She has won many state "young reader" or "children's choice" awards. Peg's characters are ordinary kids who find themselves in exciting situations and who use their wits to solve their problems. There is usually humor as well as suspense in her books. A long-time volunteer at The Humane Society, she often uses animals in her stories.



Before she began writing books for children, Peg published plays, short stories, articles, and two books for adults. She is a frequent speaker at conferences for librarians and teachers.




At the age of twelve, Peg had polio and was paralyzed from the neck down. Because she can remember that experience and her year of recovery so vividly, she finds it easy to write in the viewpoint of a twelve or thirteen year old. Most of her main characters are that age. Her autobiography, Small Steps: The Year I Got Polio, won the Golden Kite Award from the Society of Children's Book Writers & Illustrators, and the PEN Center USA West Award for Children's Literature.




When she is not writing, Peg likes to watch baseball, bake cookies, and pump her old player piano.







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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2014

    Good

    Is pretty good.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2001

    searching for candlestick park

    Spencer Atwood, a twelve-year-old boy is trying to find his dad because his mom is trying to get rid of his cat. One problem, he lives in San Francisco. How can he get down there on a bike and a cat and only fourteen dollars? On the way he will meet people, some are good and some are bad. Will he make it? Who knows, to find out read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2000

    Catch this book and you'll Score

    This book is about a 12 yr boy searching for his absent father. He leaves his mom and aunte in Seattle and travels to SanFransico with his cat Foxy. Is it worth it? Spencer finds a unusual home in Oregon with a single elderly man. Should Spencer trust this mysterious man? He does, but finds dad and realizes he isn't who he thought he was. Spencer returns home only to find a unexpected news in Oregon before he makes it back to Seattle.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2000

    Many Kids feel like this

    A fascinating book about a boy from a broken family searching for his absent father. He attempts to make it to SanFransico, but on the way meets a single elderly man who changes his life. He likewise finds out his father is more of a dream than reality.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

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