A Season of Angels [NOOK Book]

Overview

Wishes for love bring hope from above.

Shirley, Goodness, and Mercy—three willing but sometimes wayward angels—areeach given someone's prayer to answer . . .

Shirley: She's sent to help nine-year-old Timmy Potter, who longs for a new father. And although his mother, Jody, has vowed never to trust any man, Shirley is determined to help her love again.

Goodness: She knows Monica Fischer longs for a husband and ...

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A Season of Angels

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Overview

Wishes for love bring hope from above.

Shirley, Goodness, and Mercy—three willing but sometimes wayward angels—areeach given someone's prayer to answer . . .

Shirley: She's sent to help nine-year-old Timmy Potter, who longs for a new father. And although his mother, Jody, has vowed never to trust any man, Shirley is determined to help her love again.

Goodness: She knows Monica Fischer longs for a husband and home of her own, but the young woman has practically given up on finding the right man to stand by her side . . . until Goodness steps in to help.

Mercy: Can Mercy bring hope back intoLeah Lundberg's life? This maternity nursedesperately wants a child to fill up the homeshe's made with her husband, Andrew.

But there's just one catch: Each angel must teach her charge a memorablelesson before the prayer can be granted . . .

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Angelic prayer ambassadors Shirley, Goodness, and Mercy are sent by the Archangel Gabriel to make sure three Christmas prayers are answered appropriately in this creative trilogy of heartfelt, touching novellas that was first published by Harper/Avon in 1993. This first of Macomber's popular angel books was last reissued in 1999, and fans will be waiting.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062105271
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 6/28/2011
  • Series: Angel Series , #1
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 65,358
  • File size: 489 KB

Meet the Author

Debbie Macomber

Debbie Macomber has more than 100 million copies of her books in print, and her stories about home and family have a worldwide audience and have been translated into twenty-three languages. In addition to being a #1 New York Times bestseller in fiction many times over, she also has an enormous following among knitters as the author of dozens of pattern and craft books. In 2008, she launched a branded line of knitting products through Leisure Arts, the company that publishes her knitting guides. Debbie and her husband, Wayne, have four children and nine grandchildren, and split their time between Washington State and Florida. This is Debbie’s second picture book co-authored with Mary Lou Carney; their first, The Truly Terribly Horrible Sweaer . . . That Grandma Knit, was published in 2009.

Biography

Publishing did not come easy to self-described "creative speller" Debbie Macomber. When Macomber decided to follow her dreams of becoming a bestselling novelist, she had a lot of obstacles in her path. For starters, Macomber is dyslexic. On top of this, she had only a high school degree, four young children at home, and absolutely no connections in the publishing world. If there's one thing you can say about Debbie Macomber, however, it is that she does not give up. She rented a typewriter and started writing, determined to break into the world of romance fiction.

The years went on and the rejection letters piled up. Her family was living on a shoestring budget, and Debbie was beginning to think that her dreams of being a novelist might never be fulfilled. She began writing for magazines to earn some extra money, and she eventually saved up enough to attend a romance writer's conference with three hundred other aspiring novelists. The organizers of the conference picked ten manuscripts to review in a group critique session. Debbie was thrilled to learn that her manuscript would be one of the novels discussed.

Her excitement quickly faded when an editor from Harlequin tore her manuscript to pieces in front of the crowded room, evoking peals of laughter from the assembled writers. Afterwards, Macomber approached the editor and asked her what she could do to improve her novel. "Throw it away," the editor suggested.

Many writers would have given up right then and there, but not Macomber. The deeply religious Macomber took a lesson from Job and gathered strength from adversity. She returned home and mailed one last manuscript to Silhouette, a publisher of romance novels. "It cost $10 to mail it off," Macomber told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in 2000. "My husband was out of work at this time, in Alaska, trying to find a job. The children and I were living on his $250-a-week unemployment, and I can't tell you what $10 was to us at that time."

It turned out to be the best $10 Macomber ever spent. In 1984, Silhouette published her novel, Heartsong. (Incidentally, although Heartsong was Macomber's first sale, she actually published another book, Starlight, before Heartsong went to print.) Heartsong went on to become the first romance novel to ever be reviewed in Publishers Weekly, and Macomber was finally on her way.

Today, Macomber is one of the most widely read authors in America. A regular on the New York Times bestseller charts, she is best known for her Cedar Cove novels, a heartwarming story sequence set in a small town in Washington state, and for her Knitting Books series, featuring a group of women who patronize a Seattle yarn store. In addition, her backlist of early romances, including several contemporary Westerns, has been reissued with great success.

Macomber has made a successful transition from conventional romance to the somewhat more flexible genre known as "women's fiction." "I was at a point in my life where I found it difficult to identify with a 25-year-old heroine," Macomber said in an interview with ContemporaryRomanceWriters.com. "I found that I wanted to write more about the friendships women share with each other." To judge from her avid, ever-increasing fan base, Debbie's readers heartily approve.

Good To Know

Some outtakes from our interview with Macomber:

"I'm dyslexic, although they didn't have a word for it when I was in grade school. The teachers said I had 'word blindness.' I've always been a creative speller and never achieved good grades in school. I graduated from high school but didn't have the opportunity to attend college, so I did what young women my age did at the time -- I married. I was a teenager, and Wayne and I (now married nearly 37 years) had four children in five years."

"I'm a yarnaholic. That means I have more yarn stashed away than any one person could possibly use in three or four lifetimes. There's something inspiring about yarn that makes me feel I could never have enough. Often I'll go into my yarn room (yes, room!) and just hold skeins of yarn and dream about projects. It's a comforting thing to do."

"My office walls are covered with autographs of famous writers -- it's what my children call my ‘dead author wall.' I have signatures from Mark Twain, Earnest Hemingway, Jack London, Harriett Beecher Stowe, Pearl Buck, Charles Dickens, Rudyard Kipling, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, to name a few."

"I'm morning person, and rip into the day with a half-mile swim (FYI: a half mile is a whole lot farther in the water than it is on land) at the local pool before I head into the office, arriving before eight. It takes me until nine or ten to read through all of the guest book entries from my web site and the mail before I go upstairs to the turret where I do my writing. Yes, I write in a turret -- is that romantic, or what? I started blogging last September and really enjoy sharing bits and pieces of my life with my readers. Once I'm home for the day, I cook dinner, trying out new recipes. Along with cooking, I also enjoy eating, especially when the meal is accompanied by a glass of good wine. Wayne and I take particular pleasure in sampling eastern Washington State wines (since we were both born and raised in that part of the state).

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    1. Hometown:
      Port Orchard, Washington
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 22, 1948
    2. Place of Birth:
      Yakima, Washington
    1. Education:
      Graduated from high school in 1966; attended community college
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The manger was empty. Leah Lundberg walked past the nativity scene Providence Hospital put out every year, stopped, and stared. The north wind cut through her like a boning knife as Leah studied the ramshackle stable, her heart heavy, her life more so.

The blue of Mary's gown had long since faded, she noted. Joseph, leaning heavily against his staff, was slightly off-balance, and looked as if he'd topple in a stiff wind. There seemed to be one less lamb this year and one of the donkeys ears was missing. It was a small wonder the structure remained upright with the weight of the angel, yellow now instead of golden, nailed to the top. Triumphantly, she blew her chipped hom proclaiming the glorious news of the Savior's birth.

The hospital had reconstructed the Christmas scene every Advent for the last fifty years, long before Leah was born, long before she realized an entire lifetime of tears could be stored within a single tattered soul.

It was ironic that a woman who toiled as a nurse day after day on a maternity ward would be childless herself. Her work with laboring mothers was her gift, they said, her special talent. Women specifically requested that she be with them for the birthing of their children.

For whatever reason, Leah had been granted the touch, a gentle hand, and a sympathetic heart. Birthing mothers claimed she was inspiring, encouraging, and supportive. Labor didn't seem nearly as difficult when Leah was with a patient. She'd heard it all before, countless times, the praise, the gratitude. What most of Leah's patients didn't know was that she, who was an expert at labor and delivery, had never given birthherself.

Her patients left the hospital with their arms and their lives full. Each afternoon, Leah walked out of Providence alone. And empty.

Tears crowded her eyes and spilled unheeded down her cheeks. She bowed her head and closed her eyes in prayer. "Dear God," she whispered, choking down the emotion, "please give me a child." It was a plea she'd whispered innumerable times over the last ten years. So often that she was convinced God had long since given up hearing. Or caring.

Wiping the moisture from her face, she gathered her coat more closely around her thin shoulders and headed for the staff parking lot. She forced herself to smile. it upset Andrew that she continued to dwell on their inability to have children, and she didn't want him to know she'd been crying.

Her husband had accepted the news with little more than a shrug. He felt bad, knowing how desperately she longed for a baby, but it wasn't nearly as earth-shattering to him. If God saw fit to send children into their -lives, then fine, if not, that was fine too.

It wasn't all right with Leah and she doubted that it ever would be.

Leah's prayer whistled in the breeze, up through the bare spindly arms of a lanky birch tree, winging its way higher and higher until it had ascended the clouds and drifted into the warm winds of heaven. It arrived fresh with the salt of her tears at the desk of the Archangel Gabriel. The very angel who'd announced the news of the virgin birth to Mary nearly two thousand years earlier. His responsibilities had been wide and varied through time, but he felt a certain tenderness for humans and their multiple problems. He found earth's population to be a curious lot. They were stubborn, rebellious, and arrogant. Their antics were a constant source of amusement to those behind the pearly gates. Who could help laughing at a group of people who heatedly declared that God was dead and clung to the belief that Elvis was alive?

"Leah Lundberg,- Gabriel repeated softly, frowning. The name was vaguely familiar. He flipped the pages of a cumbersome book until he'd found what he was seeking. Sighing, he relaxed against the back of his chair and slowly shook his head. Leah was one of his most persistent cases. He'd heard her prayer often, had ushered it himself to the very feet of God.

Gabriel had sent countless couriers to intercede on Leah's behalf, but their efforts had been met with repeated failure. Time after time, their reports came back virtually the same. It was a familiar problem that blocked the answer to Leah's prayer. Herself.

It would have been much easier if Gabriel could sit down with Leah and talk out this matter face to face. Circumstances arose now and again when doing exactly what was required, but generally not when it came to answering prayer. Humans tended to believe all that was required of them was a few mumbled words, then they were utterly content to leave the matter in the hands of God.

Through the ages humans had yet to discover what should have been obvious. The answers to prayer required participation. The people of earth expected God to do it all. Only a shocking few realized they had their own role to perform.

A good example was a request that had come in earlier from Monica Fischer, a preacher's daughter. Monica had asked for a husband. Normally this wouldn't be a problem; she was twenty-five and strikingly attractive, or would be if she didn't choose to disguise her natural beauty. The whole process of attracting a young man was complicated by her self-righteous attitude. Few men, even devout servants of God, were willing to marry sanctimonious prudes.

Gabriel hadn't decided how he would handle Monica's request or the prayer that had come in the unusual form of a letter from Timmy Potter. Gabriel had a soft spot when it came to children's prayers. Timmy was nine, and had requested a father...

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 38 )
Rating Distribution

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(19)

4 Star

(9)

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(5)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 28, 2012

    another excellent read !

    Every Debbie Macomber book I have read and I have nearly everyone she has available at Barnes and Nobel, are just excellent. They are
    real and can be tied into our lives easily. She has millions in print
    and I have all that I can get on my nook book. Love them! An extra good series for any Christian reader.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 27, 2011

    Highly Recommended

    This book will leave you with the Christmas spirit all year long. Debbie has brought her three angels together for all of us to enjoy.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 10, 2011

    Full of Typos

    This book has so many typos it is distracting to the story because you have to keep figuring out what that word was supposed to be!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 21, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A Season of Angels

    THIS BOOK IS BEYOND AMAZING...My friend let me barrow it and i loved it just reading the first chapter!

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2013

    Was very disappointed with the content of this book. Was told it was a family-friendly book. I don't believe it is.

    Shirley, Goodness, and Mercy are cute angels. Their antics are fun. I don't like the way the author has to describe every sexual thing in great detail. It is not family-friendly reading in my opinion.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2013

    Angelic read

    I was not aware there is a series of angel books and ended up reading them out of order but didn't care once I had them all read. Great book!

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  • Posted January 22, 2013

    I do recommend this book.

    This was the first of the angels series books by Debbie Macomber that I have read. I really enjoyed reading it. Very heart warming with some comedy thrown in.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2013

    Lovely book.

    Highly recommend this as welk as her other books

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2012

    Season of Angels

    first of these series I read and i enjoyed it. loved the antics of the angels and sometimes the way we think things should work is so way different than God's plan.

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    Posted December 5, 2011

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    Posted January 2, 2011

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    Posted December 12, 2009

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    Posted August 15, 2011

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    Posted February 12, 2013

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