A Season of Gifts

( 11 )

Overview

One of children's literature's most memorable characters returns in this Christmastime companion to the Newbery Medal-winning A Year Down Yonder and Newbery Honor-winning A Long Way from Chicago.

The eccentric, larger-than-life Grandma Dowdel is back in this heart-warming tale. Set 20 years after the events of A Year Down Yonder, it is now 1958 and a new family has moved in next door: a Methodist minister and his wife and kids. Soon Grandma Dowdel will work her particular brand ...

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A Season of Gifts

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Overview

One of children's literature's most memorable characters returns in this Christmastime companion to the Newbery Medal-winning A Year Down Yonder and Newbery Honor-winning A Long Way from Chicago.

The eccentric, larger-than-life Grandma Dowdel is back in this heart-warming tale. Set 20 years after the events of A Year Down Yonder, it is now 1958 and a new family has moved in next door: a Methodist minister and his wife and kids. Soon Grandma Dowdel will work her particular brand of charm on all of them: ten-year-old Bob Barnhart, who is shy on courage in a town full of bullies; his two fascinating sisters; and even his parents, who are amazed to discover that the last house in town might also be the most vital.
As Christmas rolls around, the Barnhart family realizes that they’ve found a true home, and a neighbor who gives gifts that will last a lifetime.
 
“Pitch-perfect prose, laced with humor and poignancy, strong characterization and a clear development of the theme of gifts one person can offer make this one of Peck’s best novels yet—and that’s saying something.”—Kirkus (starred review)
 
“The type of down-home humor and vibrant characterizations Peck fans have come to adore re-emerge in full.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)
 
“With a storyteller's sure tone, Peck has once again created a whole world in one small Illinois town, a place where the folksy wisdom and generosity of one gruff old woman can change lives.”—School Library Journal (starred review)
 
Publishers Weekly Best Books of the Year
Kirkus Reviews Best Books of the Year
Booklist Editors’ Choice

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
-This is one of Peck+s best novels yet-and that+s saying something.+-Kirkus Reviews, starred review
Kristi Jemtegaard
Full of read-aloud lines that hover between humor and heartbreak, this third installment, which begins in the dog days of summer and ends under a Christmas star, is an invitation to families everywhere to begin a tradition of giving gifts that will endure.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
The type of down-home humor and vibrant characterizations Peck fans have come to adore re-emerge in full as Peck resurrects Mrs. Dowdel, the irrepressible, self-sufficient grandmother featured in A Year Down Yonder and A Long Way from Chicago. Set in 1958, his new novel is told from the point of view of 12-year-old Bob Barnhart, Mrs. Dowdel's new neighbor, who is distraught about having to move from Terre Haute to a “podunk” town, where his Methodist minister father has been called to shepherd a meager sprinkling of parishioners. Mrs. Dowdel is a source of entertainment, and some fear, for Bob and his sisters (“she could be amazingly light on her big pins. We'd already seen her take a broom and swat a Fuller Brush man off her porch”). But more important, she proves useful in outsmarting bullies and attracting new members to Mr. Barnhart's fold. Not all of Grandma Dowdel's gifts to the Barnharts (and in some cases the entire community) are as tangible as the windows she donates to the church, but her actions exude as much warmth and wisdom as they do hilarity. Ages 10–up. (Sept.)
Horn Book
Irascible, independent, and unorthodox as ever, Grandma Dowdel makes a welcome return...she's entered that rare pantheon of unforgettably great characters.
Booklist
There's plenty to admire here . . . Highly recommended for reading aloud. , starred review
VOYA - Pam Carlson
Junior high school student Bob Barnhart, older sister Phyllis, first grader Ruth Ann, and their parents move to a small Illinois town in 1958. Their nextdoor neighbor is the indomitable and often fearsome Mrs. Dowdel of A Year Down Yonder (Dial, 2000/VOYA December 2000) and A Long Way From Chicago (Dial, 1998/VOYA December 1998). Mrs. D., although she "doesn't neighbor," proves to be an unexpected giver of gifts big and small, from fruitcakes to boosting Bob's self-confidence to restoring Ruth Ann's belief in Santa. Bob's preacher father has trouble attracting a crowd until the skeleton of the "Kickapoo Princess" is found buried in Mrs. Dowdel's backyard. His inspired preaching at the funeral for the remains establishes his reputation among all the churches of the community. Finally being the preacher's son pays off for Bob. Meanwhile a secret alliance between Mrs. Barnhart and Mrs. Dowdel helps end Elvis-obsessed Phyllis' sneaking out with Presley look-alike, bad boy Roscoe. There are so many wonderful throwaway lines that that the entire book begs to be read aloud to get the full flavor. In speaking of a fellow senior citizen, Mrs. Dowdel states, "And you think she's bow-legged now. You should have seen her as a girl. She'd try to cross her legs and miss." Do not miss this memorable gift of Peck's offbeat characters and uncommon situations interwoven with droll wit. Reviewer: Pam Carlson
Children's Literature - Sharon Salluzzo
Bob Barnhart recalls living next door to Mrs. Dowdel the autumn of the year he was twelve and his preacher father was assigned to a small dilapidated church in a rural Illinois town. It was 1958. Bob's fourteen-year-old sister Phyllis, who had a crush on Elvis Presley, despised living in the small town. His lonesome little sister Ruth Ann slowly but surely became Mrs. Dowdel's sidekick. Although she is described as "real cranky, but well-armed" Bob discovered over time that this old lady had another side to her. She bestowed upon each member of the family gifts that are both tangible and intangible, and Bob's account of that year enables readers to discover what it means to be a neighbor. Peck artfully captures small town life in the 1950s. Readers familiar with Peck's A Year Down Yonder and A Long Way from Chicago will be thoughtfully entertained with Mrs. Dowdel's reappearance. Although older in this book, she is still as feisty, self-reliant, wise, and quietly compassionate as ever. Peck's novel is storytelling at its finest; here we find graceful prose peppered with exquisite wordplay and understated humor. A finely drawn full-page pen-and-ink illustration introduces each of the three sections of the book, offering a glimpse of what is to come. Reviewer: Sharon Salluzzo
School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—Grandma Dowdel (A Long Way from Chicago [1998], A Year Down Yonder [2000]) is back in Newbery Award-winning author Richard Peck's latest novel (2009, all Dial). It's 1958 and the Barnhart family—12-year-old Bob, his two sisters, his preacher father, and his mother—moves into the house next to Mrs. Dowdel. The unconventional touches of the wise, 90-year-old woman are felt throughout this story from the moment she rescues Bob from a stunt pulled by the neighborhood bad boy. Told from Bob's perspective, Peck's characters are all fully voiced by Ron McLarty, giving listeners clear images of Bob's Elvis-obsessed older sister and the other quirky characters in this small Illinois town with a big heart. The lessons that Bob learns in the year that he is Mrs. Dowdel's neighbor are gently portrayed as listeners discover the true gifts she has given to the entire town. Fans of the previous books will not be disappointed, and new listeners will feel at home.—Stephanie A. Squicciarini, Fairport Public Library, NY
Kirkus Reviews
According to 12-year-old Bob, "We Barnharts had moved in next door to a haunted house, if a house can be haunted by a living being." Bob's first encounter with its owner, Mrs. Dowdel, is inauspicious, as she discovers Bob strung up naked in a spider's web of fishing line inside her privy. But Mrs. Dowdel offers the gift of friendship to Bob's six-year-old sister Ruth Ann, and by the end of this 1958 Christmas season, each of the Barnharts will have been touched by gifts she has given. Peck's challenge in his third Grandma Dowdel novel-Mrs. Dowdel now-is how to make the redoubtable lady the central character when she's the next-door neighbor. He succeeds admirably, bringing to life each of the five Barnharts and subtly infusing their lives with the presence of their remarkable neighbor. Pitch-perfect prose, laced with humor and poignancy, strong characterization and a clear development of the theme of gifts one person can offer make this one of Peck's best novels yet-and that's saying something. (Historical fiction. 10 & up)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803730823
  • Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Publication date: 9/17/2009
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 256,569
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Lexile: 690L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard Peck

Richard Peck has written more than thirty novels, and in the process has become one of the country’s most highly respected writers for children. In fact The Washington Post called him “America’s best living author for young adults.” A versatile writer, he is beloved by middle-graders as well as young adults for his historical and contemporary comedies and coming-of-age novels. He lives in New York City, and spends a great deal of time traveling around the country to speaking engagements at conferences, schools, and libraries.

Mr. Peck is the first children’s book author to have received a National Humanities Medal. He is a Newbery Medal winner (for A Year Down Yonder), a Newbery Honor winner (for A Long Way from Chicago), a two-time National Book Award finalist, and a two-time Edgar Award winner. In addition, he has won a number of major honors for the body of his work, including the Margaret A. Edwards Award, the ALAN Award, and the Medallion from the University of Southern Mississippi.

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Read an Excerpt

Mrs. Dowdel

One evening we were just settling around the supper table. There were some slices of ham from somewhere. Mother had pulled together a potato salad out of three potatoes. We’d just joined hands. Dad began, “For what we are about to receive—”

When an almighty explosion rocked the room. Our kitchen clock stopped, and the box of matches jumped off the stove. Every nesting bird in the county took flight.

Russians, we thought, and without a Civil Defense bomb shelter for miles. Another explosion erupted and bounced off every house from here to the grain elevator.

Ruth Ann slid off her chair and was at the kitchen door. We all followed. Now Mrs. Dowdel, gray in the gloaming, loomed out from around her cobhouse. In one of her hands hung a double-barreled shotgun, an old-time Winchester 21, from the look of it. Both barrels smoked.

In her other fist she carried a pair of headless rats. They hung by their tails, and they were good-sized, almost cat-sized.

She lumbered up to her cauldron and swung the rats onto the white embers beneath. As a family, we turned away just as they burst into flame.

Also by Richard Peck

NOVELS FOR YOUNG ADULTS

Amanda/Miranda

Are You in the House Alone?

Bel-Air Bambi and the Mall Rats

Blossom Culp and the Sleep of Death

Close Enough to Touch

Don’t Look and It Won’t Hurt

The Dreadful Future of Blossom Culp

Dreamland Lake

Fair Weather

Father Figure

The Ghost Belonged to Me

Ghosts I Have Been

The Great Interactive Dream Machine

Here Lies the Librarian

The Last Safe Place on Earth

A Long Way from Chicago

Lost in Cyberspace

On the Wings of Heroes

Princess Ashley

Remembering the Good Times

Representing Super Doll

The River Between Us

Secrets of the Shopping Mall

Strays Like Us

The Teacher’s Funeral

Those Summer Girls I Never Met

Through a Brief Darkness

Unfinished Portrait of Jessica

Voices After Midnight

A Year Down Yonder

NOVELS FOR ADULTS

Amanda/Miranda

London Holiday

New York Time

This Family of Women

SHORT STORIES

Past Perfect, Present Tense

PICTURE BOOK

Monster Night at Grandma’s House

NONFICTION

Anonymously Yours

Invitations to the World

RICHARD PECK

A Season of Gifts

The Last House in Town

CHAPTER ONE

Locked and Loaded

You could see from here the house was haunted. Its crooked old lightning rods pointed bony fingers at the sky. It hadn’t had a lick of paint since VJ Day, maybe the war before that. A porch sagged off the side. The kitchen screen door hung from a hinge. Only the snowball bushes crowding its foundations seemed to hold the place up.

At night, lights moved from room to room. Every evening just at dusk a light bobbed down the walk to the cobhouse and the privy behind, and back again.

My little sister, Ruth Ann, couldn’t take her eyes off the place. She’d rest her chin on the windowsill and plant her nose on screen wire. What else did she have to do?

“It’s like Halloween here in August,” she’d say. “I betcha there are spooks inside that house.”

“No,” Mother said behind her. “No spooks.”

“What do you think, Bobby?” I was Ruth Ann’s big brother, so she thought I knew things. “Spooks or not?”

Over her head, Mother gave me one of her direct looks, so I said, “Probably not.”

But even when Ruth Ann took her hula hoop and her doll buggy out on our front walk, she was all eyes. She’d watch the house while she revolved in her hoop and rocked her doll. She spent a lot of time outside, hoping a friend would happen to her.

So we Barnharts had moved in next door to a haunted house, if a house can be haunted by a living being. But the old lady who lived over there had to be just this side of the grave with one foot in it. She looked older than the town. But she was way too solid to be a ghost. You sure couldn’t see through her. You could barely see around her.

A long straight garden grew down this side of her property. Every blazing morning she’d tramp off her back porch and down her garden rows with a hoe humped on her shoulder. Her straw hat looked like she’d swiped it off a mule. It hid her face except for the chins. She worked right through high noon in a fog of flies, hoeing, yanking weeds, and talking to her tomato plants.

The heat slowed her some, and the flies. But she could be amazingly light on her big pins. We’d already seen her take a broom and swat a Fuller Brush man off her porch. She kept right at his heels till he was off her property.

As everybody knew, she didn’t neighbor and went to no known church. She was not only real cranky, but well-armed. Word was that she had a regular arsenal of weaponry behind her woodbox. They said it was like Fort Leonard Wood behind her stove. They said she was locked and loaded.

She had to be pushing ninety, so rumors had grown up around her. One was that her property was on top of an ancient Kickapoo burying grounds, and that’s spooky right there.

Only a ragged row of fleshy red canna flowers separated her garden from our yard. “You children stay on this side of the cannas,” Mother said. “Let’s let sleeping dogs lie.”

Mother didn’t have to worry about me. I was a boy, but not that brave. I wouldn’t have set a toe over that line. And she didn’t mean my big sister, Phyllis, who was sulking upstairs over having to start high school in a new town. Mother meant Ruth Ann. She was hard to keep track of unless she was following you around.

“Remember who we are,” Mother said. “And we’re new here. All eyes are upon us.”

It wasn’t going to be the kind of town that rolls out the welcome mat. Still, a few people brought us things to eat just to see us up close. On a good day, an angel food cake. Moore’s IGA store sent us out some half-price coupons and a sample size of Rinso soap. But Moore’s was cash-and-carry, and we didn’t have any cash.

Toward the end of our first week, somebody left five dandy ears of sweet corn on our porch. They were half silked to show the pearly kernels. But unknown hands had left the corn. They couldn’t be from next door, since no corn grew in Mrs. Dowdel’s garden.

CHAPTER TWO

Revival Dust

I tried to make August last because September, and school, didn’t look good. We were not only newcomers, but we were P.K.s—preacher’s kids. So everybody’d be gunning for us, and we’d be living in a fishbowl.

But not yet, not in August. Cut us this much slack. Let’s get settled here in this new house before we have to take on the town. The house was okay. I had my own room.

“Let’s give thanks we have an indoor bathroom,” Dad said. The town was still crawling with privies and pumps, though our house and the house next door were about the only ones without television antennas. Around here you needed an antenna twice as high as your house, if you had television.

Mother stood over Ruth Ann at our side window, gazing out past the peeling house next door to open, empty country.

“I take back every bad thing I ever thought about Terre Haute,” Mother often said in a far-off voice.

We saw a lot of Mrs. Dowdel next door. There was a lot of her to see. But she never seemed to see us back. She didn’t have time. On a circle of burned grass in her yard an iron pot hung from a tripod. She seemed to be pulping down apples for apple butter over a white-hot fire. She stirred an ancient paddle with holes in it. Once in a while she’d stand back to mop up under the mule hat. Then back to stirring she’d go, two-fisted on the long paddle.

“I betcha that’s witch’s brew in that cauldron,” Ruth Ann said, very interested. “I betcha Mrs. Dowdel has warts where you can’t see.”

“There are no witches,” Mother said. “There are only old ladies who prize their privacy.”

Mrs. Dowdel weeded like a wild woman. Only when somebody passed on the road would she stand up and glance that way, running a hand down her back. Never waving. There was a bunch of boys in town, big ugly ones. They’d tramp past, heading for the crick every afternoon, punching each other. Mrs. Dowdel always watched them out of sight. She seemed to take an interest in them, but not a friendly interest. Then she’d have several sharp things to say to her tomatoes.

One evening we were just settling around the supper table. There were some slices of ham from somewhere. Mother had pulled together a potato salad out of three potatoes. We’d just joined hands. Dad began, “For what we are about to receive—”

When an almighty explosion rocked the room. Our kitchen clock stopped, and the box of matches jumped off the stove. Every nesting bird in the county took flight.

Russians, we thought, and without a Civil Defense bomb shelter for miles. Another explosion erupted and bounced off every house from here to the grain elevator.

Ruth Ann slid off her chair and was at the kitchen door. We all followed. Now Mrs. Dowdel, gray in the gloaming, loomed out from around her cobhouse. In one of her hands hung a double-barreled shotgun, an old-time Winchester 21, from the look of it. Both barrels smoked.

In her other fist she carried a pair of headless rats. They hung by their tails, and they were good-sized, almost cat-sized.

She lumbered up to her cauldron and swung the rats onto the white embers beneath. As a family, we turned away just as they burst into flame.

“This is why the Methodist Conference stuck us in this house, this so-called parsonage,” Phyllis said. “Who else would live next door to her? I hate this town. I can’t tell you how much.”

*  *  *

Headless rats darted across my dreams through those nights. By day I helped Dad down at the church. There’d been a church building to spare when the two bunches of United Brethren united again. They naturally went with the better church building, brick. We got the other one. And it looked more like a corncrib than anything else—one puff of wind from a pile of kindling. Somebody’d shot out all the windows, and the roof was a sieve.

Dad had already killed a hog snake coiled in the choir loft. He and the snake met up by chance, and all Dad could think of to do was drop a box of hymnals on its head.

And if you don’t like spiders, this wasn’t your kind of place.

We kept busy. I sanded and shellacked the pews. Dad fitted the windows with plastic sheeting. There wasn’t money for plate glass. There wasn’t money for anything. We were eating off our own front porch.

Dad sang hymns while we worked: “Stand up! Stand up for Jesus.” Peppy hymns. He had a fine baritone voice, only a little wobbly on the high notes. I’d jump in with some harmony for him, though I was still pretty much a soprano. “We must not! We must not! We must not suffer loss!” we sang, ringing a rafter or two. I didn’t think we were half bad. But Dad was a worried man. He could do about anything with his hands. He had big hands. But it was going to take more than hammer and nails.

Over in Terre Haute he’d been assistant pastor at Third Methodist. This was the first pulpit all his own. It was going to be make-it-or-break-it for Dad here. And we hadn’t seen many of those Methodists we’d heard were waiting for The Word and a preacher to bring it.

Still, we had time to get the place squared away. August was the big tent-show revival month. You couldn’t get a church off the ground until the revival dust settled.

A sign appeared out by Mrs. Dowdel’s mailbox:

SPARE ROOMS FOR BELIEVERS

A tent the size of Ringling Brothers’ big top rose in the park uptown, the bald ground between the business block and the Norfolk & Western tracks. A giant banner stretched high between the tent poles, reading:

YOU THINK IT’S HOT HERE!

The number one evangelist of the sawdust circuit was coming for a week of preaching. He was Delmer “Gypsy” Piggott, well-known in his time, though his time was running out. They called him the Texas Tornado for his preaching style. He’d built a big tabernacle at Del Rio.

We didn’t go that Monday night. Local preachers and their families didn’t. It wasn’t our kind of worship.

Besides, money in the revival’s collection plate was money that never made it to ours. In a week Gypsy Piggott could scare a lot of money out of a town.

But the revival came to us. Cars and trucks parked past our house and out of town. You could hear everything from here, four blocks from the tent. Mother tied on a fresh apron, and we sat out on our front porch, hearing the gospel quartette, four high sopranos in some very close harmony, backed up by a blare of trumpets. And they could belt out a hymn:

Don’t give me no newfangled religion,

Slick as a Cadillac’s fin;

Just give me that old-time religion

And the way things was back then.

Mother sighed from the porch swing.

Then Gypsy Piggott climbed onto his pulpit. They had a dynamite speaker system. The whole county could stay home and hear every word. His fist on the Bible was like an earth tremor. That collection plate rang like an alarm bell.

He didn’t mince words either. He had us sinners in the fiery pit before you knew where you were. We were all on the wrong path, and Gypsy Piggott knew where it led. Liquor and bad women were mentioned. His language was pretty rough, and he had no grammar to speak of.

Mother sent Ruth Ann into the house, for all the good that would do. “It’s what people want around here,” Phyllis said. “That’s what they’re like. Why are we even here? Nobody’ll want a real church. I hate this podunk town.”

*  *  *

Late that night I was jolted awake. It had to be midnight when Mrs. Dowdel’s screen door banged two or three times. Feet scuffled on her back porch.

My window looked down on her place. Moonlight was slick on her tar-paper roof. Yellow light fell from the kitchen windows across her porch floor.

Stuff began to fly off the porch and bounce in her yard. Suitcases? Trumpet cases? More came. White moths seemed to flutter across the grass, but it might have been sheet music.

I couldn’t see how many people were on the porch. But it was Mrs. Dowdel who barged through them and outside. She wore a nightgown the size of the revival tent. Cold moonlight hit her white hair loose in the night breeze. She held something high and poured from it onto the ground.

“‘WINE IS A MOCKER, STRONG DRINK IS RAGING,’” she bellowed into the night. “Proverbs. 20:1. You could look it up. I don’t have hard liquor in my house. It goes, and so do you.”

She seemed to pour strong drink out on the grass. Now she hauled off and threw the bottle. She had an arm on her. The bottle glinted in moonlight, hit her cobhouse roof, and rolled off.

“Now, now, Mrs. Dowdel,” a voice said, “calm yourself. ‘A man hath no better thing under the sun, than to eat, and to drink, and to be merry.’ Ecclesiastes. 8:15.”

I’d have known that voice in the fiery pit. It was the Texas Tornado, Delmer “Gypsy” Piggott. Now I could hear Mother and Dad stirring around in their room.

My nose was flat to screen wire. “GET OFF MY PLACE,” Mrs. Dowdel bellowed, “and take these . . . sopranos with you. Trumpets, strumpets—everybody out.”

More shoe-scuffling came from the porch, and the peck of high heels. A sob and some squealing. The gospel quartette milled.

“You’ve rented your last rooms in this town, you two-faced old goat,” Mrs. Dowdel thundered. The whole town was wide-awake now. “Hit the road.”

“Dad-burn it, Mrs. Dowdel,” the Texas Tornado whined, “we done paid you out for the whole week with ready money. Cash on the barrelhead.”

“I’m about a squat jump away from a loaded Winchester 21,” Mrs. Dowdel replied, “and I’m tetchy as a bull in fly time.”

She turned back against a tide of sopranos and stalked into her house. Whether she was going for her gun or to bed nobody could know. The figures milled some more. A suitcase came open. But then they started for the road. A big Lincoln Continental was parked out there, washed by moonbeams. Doors banged, and the Lincoln gunned away, shaking off the dust of this town.

A room away, Mother sighed.

Then silence fell upon the listening town, and the moon slid behind a cloud. Somewhere farther out in the fields a swooping owl pounced on squealing mice. But they were faint squeaks, and far-off.

CHAPTER THREE

The Boy Next Door

Dad and I had to keep wringing out our shirts all that next day. It was a hundred in the shade, hotter inside the church. He sent me home early.

As I came past the park, they were already taking down the big revival tent—folding the tent and stealing away. They’d only managed to pass the collection plate that first night, thanks to Mrs. Dowdel. Now the Texas Tornado was having to touch down somewhere else.

People may have hated to miss the rest of revival week. But telling each other how Gypsy Piggott was chased off was interesting and some consolation. I never knew anyplace where news traveled faster. It wasn’t as slow a town as it looked.

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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club.com

    Grandma Dowdel's back, only this time she's known as Mrs. Dowdel to the Methodist preacher's family that just moved in next door. The family, which includes three children, has been relocated from Terre Haute, Indiana to take over what is to be a new Methodist church but what is now a run-down building with no windows, a deteriorating roof and no congregation in a small Illinois town.

    As family members work to adjust to a new life, gruff old Mrs. Dowdel next door seems to know exactly what each needs. Bob, who tells the story, is the middle child on the verge of puberty. He's the easy target of bullies and in need of confidence as well as friends. Phyllis, fourteen going on twenty, is appalled at having to start high school in a place where she knows no one. Her obsession with everything Elvis leads her to take up with an unsavory character and start lying to her parents about where she's going and what she's doing. Six-year-old Ruth Ann is starting first grade, and she's searching for someone to look up to. The dad, of course, needs a congregation, and the mom needs help keeping them all functioning well.

    Fans of A Long Way from Chicago and A Year Down Yonder will be happy to read more about Grandmas Dowdel's schemes to influence her small town and the family next door for the better. She's just a gruff as ever, but older now. The gifts she bestows are not the kind you can wrap and put under a Christmas tree, but they are the kind no receiver would seek to return. Peck is a master of subtle storytelling, letting the reader reach conclusions about the characters along the way. He's also superb at bringing bygone times to life, and in A Season of Gifts he deftly captures life in a small town during the late 1950s.

    I read this book aloud to the whole family, which includes my husband and two teen daughters. We all loved it, something rare for the four of us with our different tastes in books. I highly recommend it for family reading as well as for children aged nine and up.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Funny As Usual!

    Richard Peck brings together Grandma Dowdel and the kooky castmates that live in that small Illinois town to life again! I love that he wrote a third book as a follow-up to "A Year Down Yonder" and "A Long Way From Chicago." I grew up in a small town in northern Indiana and can imagine all these escapades occuring just as Richard Peck writes. I highly recommend these books (as a Mom and educator) for your children - and for YOU as a parent. They are imagnative and fun :0)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 12, 2014

    Great for anyone.

    This is book three of a trilogy BUT can be read as a stand alone book. This book is appropriate for anyone that understands the concept of good and bad behavior. Can maybe find a lesson in here for children. (Parents, read it first).

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  • Posted August 15, 2012

    The third book from Richard Peck describing life in a small town

    The third book from Richard Peck describing life in a small town with
    Grandma Dowdel (the first being "A Long Way From Chicago", the
    second, "A Year Down Yonder", both award winners) is told from
    the point of view of Bob, a young boy who, along with his family,
    including minister dad, mom, older sister Phyllis, and younger sister
    Ruth Ann, has moved in next door to Mrs. Dowdel. While not quite up to
    par, in my opinion, to the first two books, I still greatly enjoyed this
    one. This one is set in 1958, approximately 15 years after we last
    visited. We get a few brief mentions of Grandma's family that we met in
    the first two books, which was nice. Familiar characters, or at least
    their kin, make appearances in this book. We get to see how the town has
    grown and changed over the years (and in some cases, not changed at
    all). And, we get more of Grandma's hijinks and peculiar brand of
    good-heartedness. The only thing that keeps me from giving this book
    five stars like the first two is that it doesn't quite give the sense of
    innocence and realism the first two did. The first two felt like true
    stories that may actually have happened to the author/narrator as a
    young person and have simply garnered some embellishments over time.
    This book feels more like a story someone made up. A good story, but
    still, it doesn't quite get that ring of truth the first two did. In
    addition, in the first two stories we get to know Grandma Dowdel, to
    understand who she is, what she's like, and what her motivations are. We
    understand that underlying her actions is a sense of justice and
    integrity and generosity, and an appreciation for hard work. These
    things are revealed subtly and naturally through her actions and
    interactions in the first two books. In this latest book, these things
    felt a little more forced. Granted, these are really minor quibbles and
    come about only through comparison with the other two books, and
    otherwise, it is still a lovely book. A couple of notes about this
    book: 1) I don't recommend reading it as a stand alone. While it could,
    technically, be read on its own, you get to know Grandma Dowdel and her
    actions and motivations much better through the first two books, which
    allow you to come into this book understanding what she's like. Without
    that background, she may just come across as a loony old eccentric for
    most of this story. 2) Although it's called "A Season of
    Gifts", and the cover seems very Christmas-y, the book is not
    strictly a Christmas story, and could easly be read at any time of year.
    It starts in August, and continues on throughout the fall and into
    Christmas towards the end. So, while it certainly does make a lovely
    story to read around the holidays, it is really suitable for any time of year.

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  • Posted February 25, 2011

    A fun-filled, too similar to real life, humorous story; a surprise book-full of love and kindness.

    The Barnhart family has just moved from a nice township in Indiana to a small, isolated rural town in Illinois, not by choice, but because the head of the household, Reverend Barnhart, just received his first pulpit assignment. In addition to this change, the only house available to them is the house right next door to Grandma Dowdel, the rough old lady who "don't neighbor", best known as the ever-surprising heroine in A Year Down Yonder and A Long Way from Chicago, both written by Richard Peck. This family of five is not only "short on cash", but completely lacking in the ways of a tiny rural town and the people who live there.
    The children, fourteen year old Phyllis, an Elvis fanatic who acts like she is twenty, twelve year old Bob, a lonely boy with very big dreams and little hope of fulfilling them, and Ruth Ann, a six year old in her own world looking for a role model, fear the worst and see no hope in this small forsaken town. Yet, the Barnhart children gradually come to an unconscious realization that Mrs. Dowdel may be something more than that really old, strange, rough, country lady she appears to be. She has numerous tricks up her sleeve and a sense of humor all her own.
    This virtue filled, humorous fiction by Richard Peck will fill the reader's heart with joy and laughter. It made me look at myself again and again and ask myself "What do I do?" "What can I give?" Mr. Peck has wittingly filled this story with life lessons and numerable gifts that don't come in wrapping paper. I am sure there is a message in this book for any and all of its readers. I absolutely loved this book and have reread it four times. I highly recommend this read for anyone, ages nine to adult.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2010

    Pretty good!

    A Season of Gifts by Richard Peck was a very good book. This book helped me to realize a few things in addition to it being a nice, fun, easy-read. This book was the kind that had action but not so much that you couldn't just sit down with a warm blanket and some hot chocolate and enjoy it. One major thing that I agreed with in this book was that when you are doing something good and giving to someone else, you don't have to make it big, bold, and obvious; and that was something that Mrs. Dowdel and Ellen were good at. For example, when Ellen helped Mrs. Dowdel you wouldn't have known because she was so sneaky about it. Also, there were several things you had to follow throughout this book, including the sorority girls, the bad boys, the progress of the church, the reason the crowd was in the town at the time, and so much more. This book was awesome, and I really enjoyed it. CAR : )

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  • Posted August 10, 2010

    Not Recommended

    This book was not enjoyable. It was boring and not apprehendable. I can't even tell you what it was about. I did not understand it. I would not recommend it!!!!!!!!

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2010

    Mrs. Dowdel is at it again

    If you have read "A Year Down Yonder" and "A Long Way from chicago" you will certainly want to read this book as well. It is kind of a way to say good bye to Grandma Dowdel. I enjoyed this book but missed the excitement and adventure of the other two books. This is told from a differnt person's point of view. The year this book takes place made me wonder about Grandma Dowdel's age...how old is she and how old was she in the other books written by Richard Peck.
    As an educator and parent I think these are great books for young people to read. My mom read these as well and loved them. So great for all ages.
    I believe the other two books with Grandma Dowdel would make great movies! She is a character like no other. It was fun to hear about her once more.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2010

    Mrs. Dowdel rides again

    Richard Peck does a wonderful job returning readers to visit with Grandma Dowdel. She is always the rough, tough older lady with a surprising soft spot. I love Mrs. Dowdel, her view of the world, and the way she handles issues that arise. This is a must read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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