Seaworthy: A Swordboat Captain Returns to the Sea

Seaworthy: A Swordboat Captain Returns to the Sea

by Linda Greenlaw
     
 

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America's only female swordfish boat captain returns with this long- awaited follow-up to the bestselling The Hungry Ocean.

After the exploits recounted in The Perfect Storm and The Hungry Ocean that made her a sensation, Linda Greenlaw took a ten- year hiatus from blue-water fishing. When an old friend offered her a captaincy on his

Overview

America's only female swordfish boat captain returns with this long- awaited follow-up to the bestselling The Hungry Ocean.

After the exploits recounted in The Perfect Storm and The Hungry Ocean that made her a sensation, Linda Greenlaw took a ten- year hiatus from blue-water fishing. When an old friend offered her a captaincy on his swordboat, Greenlaw ditched her mounting bills and headed for the sea. Full of adventure and thought-provoking reflection, Seaworthy recounts her return to the beautiful and deadly Grand Banks -from the nuances of reading weather and the complexities of longline fishing to the surprise of landing in jail for crossing into Canadian waters. The result is both a wild ride and a memorable look at one woman's struggle to define her own limits.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
Greenlaw (Fisherman's Bend, 2007, etc.) returns to the Grand Banks in search of swordfish. Writing bestsellers and pulling lobster traps out of the bay off her island home in Maine couldn't "fill the void left in the absence of true, hardy, saltwater adventure," so when opportunity knocked to skipper a swordfishing longliner to the blue water, Greenlaw jumped. She landed on the Seahawk, a vessel of such rank dilapidation the crew soon rechristened it the Shithawk. The crew also had varying degrees of mechanical problems-kidney stones, a severed thumb-but the author draws them affectionately as a stalwart bunch, who gravitate toward museums and Internet cafes during shore time. It's a pleasure to be out once more on the water with Greenlaw, like hooking up again with a favorite fishing guide. Readers may have heard a few of the stories before, but the author is such an unvarnished old hand, they're fun even in the retelling. Who can tire of sharks gnashing and thrashing around on a confined deck, or the rhythmic beauty of laying out 30 miles of line baited with 800 hooks, or heavy weather on a small boat in the big blue? The dialogue can be wooden at times, and there is a certain ripeness to some of the passages-"the diving night splashed light onto the opposite horizon, which swam like spawning salmon up the riverlike sky"-but Greenlaw speaks with unquestionable authority when fashioning the salty atmosphere of swordfishing life. A vanishing slice of life caught with ardor and freshness. Agent: Stuart Krichevsky/Stuart Krichevsky Literary Agency
Publishers Weekly
After a 10-year hiatus from blue-water fishing, Greenlaw (Hungry Ocean) went cautiously to sea, seeking a payday and perspective on her life. Thanks to The Perfect Storm phenomenon (both book and film), she was celebrated as America’s only female swordfish boat captain. She was now also a mother and an author who relished a new challenge, traveling 1,000 miles from her Maine home with an eager crew of four guys—three of them experienced sailing buddies—looking for swordfish on the 63-foot, six-and-a-half-knot steel boat Seahawk on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. It was a 52-day trip—and a sensational misadventure. Nearly everything that could go wrong, did, including her arrest for illegally fishing in Canadian waters. Greenlaw chronicles it all—a busted engine, a malfunctioning ice machine, squirrelly technology—with an absorbing mix of nautical expertise and self-deprecation. After inspecting the Seahawk, Greenlaw calls it rough, but stable and capable. Then she writes, “Although I was referring to the boat, I couldn’t help thinking the same could be said of her captain.” From mishaps to fish tales, Greenlaw keeps her narrative suspenseful. Between bad luck and self-doubt, she moves from experience to wisdom, guiding both crew and readers on a voyage of self-affirmation. (June)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780143119562
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/28/2011
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
611,519
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Praise for The Hungry Ocean

"Anyone who loves the sea will love this book."
-Sebastian Junger, author of The Perfect Storm

"A beautiful book...A story of triumph, of a woman not only making it but succeeding at the highest level in one of the most male-dominated and most dangerous professions."
-Douglas Whynott, The New York Times Book Review

Praise for The Lobster Chronicles

"These true, interwoven stories of island life and lobstering are as engaging and uncommon as [Greenlaw's] adventures at sea."
-Boston Magazine

"Captivating reading: satisfying as a Maine lobster dinner."
-Kirkus

Meet the Author

Linda Greenlaw, America’s only female swordfish boat captain, was featured in the book and film The Perfect Storm. She has written three New York Times bestselling nonfiction books about life as a commercial fisherman as well as a cookbook and two mysteries. She lives on Isle au Haut, off the coast of Maine.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Isle au Haut, Maine
Place of Birth:
Stamford, Connecticut
Education:
B.A., Colby College, 1983

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